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This is a GENERIC EXAMPLE of a presentation Please consult your course/programme handbook for specific guidelines for your presentation Text in grey italics.

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Presentation on theme: "This is a GENERIC EXAMPLE of a presentation Please consult your course/programme handbook for specific guidelines for your presentation Text in grey italics."— Presentation transcript:

1 This is a GENERIC EXAMPLE of a presentation Please consult your course/programme handbook for specific guidelines for your presentation Text in grey italics is explanatory or commonly seen additions/suggestions.

2 Your presentation title Your name Your department Your contact details Funder’s logo (if applicable) University’s logo Your audience can read this information for themselves so you don’t need to repeat it. The same is true if you have been introduced by the session chair. This generic slide is for guidance only

3 The structure of your talk Topic 1 Topic 2 Topic 3 This is where you present an outline of your talk. This helps the audience to frame the topics and sections in the broader structure. It is also helpful for the audience if you use these topics as headings and signpost during your presentation. You can have fewer or more than 3 topics. The number you can present will depend on your time. This generic slide is for guidance only

4 Topic 1 (in more detail) Topic 1.1 Topic 1.2 Topic 1.3 Topic 1.4 You can have fewer or more sub-topics. An image can be used to explain something or as a point of interest for the audience. It should be relevant and of sufficiently high quality so when it is displayed, it can be clearly seen. This generic slide is for guidance only

5 Topic 1.1 (in more detail) Topic Topic You can have fewer or more sub-topics. An image can be used to explain something or as a point of interest for the audience. It should be relevant and of sufficiently high quality so when it is displayed, it can be clearly seen. Keeping the same style and format allows the audience to remember the structure and link different parts together more easily. This generic slide is for guidance only

6 Topic 1.n (in more detail) Topic 1.n.x Topic 1.n.y You continue to talk about the rest of your sub-topics in the same order in which you presented them. If your talk is long, you may want to give a short summary of topic 1 or an intermediate conclusion, before moving on to topic 2. This means the audience doesn’t have to try to remember everything throughout and can focus on topic 2. This generic slide is for guidance only

7 Topic 2 Topic 2.1 Topic 2.2 Topic 2.3 Topic 2.4 Topic 2.5 You can have fewer or more sub-topics. This generic slide is for guidance only

8 Topic 2.1 Topic Topic You can have fewer or more sub-topics. This generic slide is for guidance only

9 Topics Topic 2.2 Topic 2.3 Topic 2.4 If topics are only briefly discussed, you could group them on a single slide rather than on separate sections. This generic slide is for guidance only

10 Topic 1 Topic 2 Topic 3 If the time between sections is long or sections do not seamlessly link, you can remind your audience where you are, by highlight the current topic for them. For shorter talks, this may not be necessary. The structure or outline of your talk This generic slide is for guidance only

11 Topic 3 (in more detail) Topic 3 You can have fewer or more sub-topics. This generic slide is for guidance only

12 Final Conclusions Challenge(s) Interesting point(s) Next step(s) Conclusion 1 Conclusion 2 Challenges and interesting points of your work will help inform your conclusions so the audience will want to hear about them. As an interesting point, you could say what direction your work will take in light of these results. You can have fewer or more conclusions. If you have given intermediate conclusions, you should restate and summarise them here, pulling them together for the audience. This generic slide is for guidance only

13 Take home message Restate and reaffirm your summary(ies) This is where you leave the audience with one or two key points they should take away from your talk. This generic slide is for guidance only

14 Thank you(s) People who helped you Funding bodies Your contact details (name, etc.) This is where you name the people who had a tangible input into your work (e.g. supervisors, research associates, colleagues, lab technicians, anyone who gave you specific training/assistance) without which, you would not have been able to complete it. This generic slide is for guidance only

15 References Reference 1 Reference 2 Reference 3 Reference 4 This should be a list of all the references cited in your presentation. It can also include any key materials (e.g. a book). If you only have one or two references, you may just want to give the full reference on the slide where it is cited. Any images and videos that are not your own require complete references. This generic slide is for guidance only

16 Extra slide 1 Extra slides are ‘in addition to’ your presentation, not part of it They can be a really interesting point that you have alluded to in your talk but did not include because it takes you over your time limit or is not directly relevant Extra slides are very useful as you can prepare them in advance to answer an expected question from the audience or explain something in more detail. They can also be used as filler if you have managed to deliver your presentation quicker than you were practising it – but be careful not to exceed your time limit by using extra slides! This generic slide is for guidance only

17 Extra slide 2 It can be useful to have extra slides …that explain methodology in more detail …or that have more results …or that have more analysis …or that present another facet of your work This generic slide is for guidance only

18 This has been a GENERIC EXAMPLE of a presentation Please consult your course/programme handbook for specific guidelines for your presentation This presentation is for guidance only.


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