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Dr. Alan Mantooth Distinguished Professor University of Arkansas.

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Presentation on theme: "Dr. Alan Mantooth Distinguished Professor University of Arkansas."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. Alan Mantooth Distinguished Professor University of Arkansas

2 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era H. Alan Mantooth 21 st Century Endowed Chair in Mixed-Signal IC Design & CAD Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering Executive Director National Center for Reliable Electric Power Transmission NSF Center for GRid-connected Advanced Power Electronic Systems NSF Vertically Integrated Center for Transformative Energy Research February 12, 2013 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Inaugural SEC Symposium

3 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Outline  What IS Smart Grid?  The Role of Power Electronics  Emphasis of UA-USC Collaborations  Power Electronics for Distributed Generation 3

4 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Significance of Electric Power 4 Source: National Academies Power Electronics

5 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Conventional power systems have four main components:  Generation: Production of electricity from other forms of energy  Transmission: Transmission of electric power from generators to distribution system; includes power stations and transmission lines  Distribution: Connection of power lines to end users or consumers  Consumers: Use the energy obtained from the previous process 5 Conventional Power Systems WIND AND SOLAR FARMS GENERATION TRANSMISSION CONSUMERS DISTRIBUTION

6 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era 6 TOTAL ENERGY 97.3 Quadrillion BTUs Processed 55.6 Quads Lost as Energy Waste = 57% Energy Waste Livermore Labs: https://flowcharts.llnl.gov/ State of the U.S. Energy Industry ELECTRICITY 39.2 Quads Generated 26.6 Quads Lost = 68% Electric Waste

7 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Factors Influencing Smart Grid 7 Smart Grid Policy Regulatory Standards Economics Environment Societal Security Storage Renewables Electronics Politics Electrical energy demand is rising Fossil fuel costs are rising

8 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Why Pursue a Smart Grid? Smart grids appear as a prevalent answer to create more efficient and sustainable energy systems, improve reliability and resiliency, maintain our standard of living, and address environmental concerns.  Satisfy the growing electricity demand  Monitor grid status and collect data from the grid  Optimize and control the produced power  Modernize and upgrade the transmission and distribution system  Enhance reliability, resiliency, sustainability and security of the grid  Minimize grid operation interruptions and blackouts  Integrate renewable sources with the energy market  Address environmental issues and respond to new energy policies 8

9 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era 9 CENTRAL POWER PLANTS PUMPED STORAGE OR CAES SOLAR FARM ENERGY STORAGE FLYWHEEL, SMES, EDLC SYSTEMS BUILDINGS INDUSTRIAL PLANTS HOUSES WIND FARM Power network Communication network PMU SMART GRID CONTROLLER PMU SMART METER What Is the Smart Grid of the Future? SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER SMART METER

10 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Body Analogy  Bones = existing electric power grid  Central nervous system = communications  Muscle = power electronics  Lifeblood, heart, and soul = engineers! 10

11 GRid-connected Advanced Power Electronic Systems (GRAPES) – An NSF I/UCRC Power Electronics: The Muscle of the Smart Grid NSF Showcase May 16, 2012

12 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Power Electronic Applications 12 ELECTRICITY GENERATION COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL

13 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era 13 Community Energy Storage Source: R. Hayes of AEP

14 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era State of the U.S. Energy Industry 14 Greater than 30% of all electricity generated is processed by power electronics and electric motor systems. Greater than $300 billion in energy is processed by power electronics and electric motor systems. Average power electronics system is 70-90% efficient (i.e. up to $60 billion in wasted energy annually).

15 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era GRAPES Mission and History  The mission of GRAPES is to accelerate the adoption and insertion of power electronics into the electric grid in order to improve system stability, flexibility, robustness and economy.  UA and USC faculty have worked together successfully for more than a decade  Started GRAPES in 2009  Why did we start GRAPES? Ans. Critical mass

16 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Strategic Planning - Providing Ongoing Benefit to our Stakeholders  Strategic Plan focusing on 8 areas  Research foci are: Distributed Energy Resources Demand Side Management Power Flow Control Power Electronic Modules Power Electronic Systems  Administrative foci are: Recruitment Performing as a Model Organization Student Excellence

17 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Component Manufacturers Equipment Providers Electric Utilities & Industrial Controls Inductors Capacitors Switch Gear Products End users of grid-connected advanced power electronic systems or demand-side controls System Requirements Research Iteration Power Devices Electronic Materials & Packaging Modeling and Simulation Circuit Design Advanced Controls Power Electronic Prototyping System Analysis & Integration Field Test and Evaluation Vertically-Integrated Research

18 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era 18 Prototype Test & Evaluation Facility  7000 ft 2 building  $5 million test facility  One-of-a-kind  Cost-effective facility for businesses, national labs, and universities  UL and IEEE Standards testing

19 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era UA Test Facility 19

20 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era SiC Power Modules (actual photos)  Collaboration with APEI, Rohm, Sandia  Built, tested, demonstrated  Operational to > 250 °C junction  Includes miniaturized integrated high temperature gate driver  R&D 100 Award Winner (2009) MMC Baseplate DBA Power Board LTCC Driver Boards Example Power Electronic Module

21 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Solid-state Fault Current Limiter 21

22 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Early Impact Optimized design over an R&D 100 Award winner! Power Module Layout SynthesisScalable Smart Power Routing DC and AC power routing between renewable sources, grid, and loads in residential, commercial & industrial applications – allows islanding

23 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Some Smart Grid Systems  Fault current limiter  Smart power routing  Interfaces to renewables (wind, solar)  Interfaces to storage (CES)  Electric vehicle charging & drive electronics  Transmission support  HVDC terminals 23

24 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Summary  Distributed Resources are the means by which the “evolution to revolution” can occur for our electric power grid Resiliency Reliability Economy Efficiency Renewables  Power electronics are the muscle behind the smart grid Condition, route, convert and shape the power for use 24

25 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era IEEE Power Electronics for Distributed Generation  PEDG 2013 – July , 2013 Expecting about 300 participants  Key Dates Deadline for digests: March 1, 2013 Notification of Acceptance: April 30, 2013 Deadline for Final Manuscripts: May 31, 2013 John Q. Hammons Center, Rogers AR

26 Energy Delivery in the Smart Grid Era Acknowledgements  SECU organizing committee  Sponsors: NSF, ONR, DARPA, DoD, DoE and lots of industry partners  Colleagues from a variety of institutions, but UA and USC first and foremost  The horses: our students! 26

27 Dr. Alan Mantooth Distinguished Professor University of Arkansas


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