Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Moore’s Law In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors per integrated circuit would double every 18 months. Moore made his famous observation.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Moore’s Law In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors per integrated circuit would double every 18 months. Moore made his famous observation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Moore’s Law In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors per integrated circuit would double every 18 months. Moore made his famous observation just four years after the first planar integrated circuit was discovered. The press called it "Moore's Law" and the name has stuck. He forecast that this trend would continue through Moore's Law has been maintained for far longer, and still holds true as we enter the new century. Source:

2 Source:

3 Forbes 400 Richest in America, 2001 “This year marks only the third since 1982 in which the collective net worth of our roster dropped, from $1.2 trillion to $950 billion. Exiting the list are 54 people, most of whom made their money in the "new economy." Admission to the list is also easier - $600 million, down from $725 million last year.” 1 Gates, William H. III 54, married Seattle, WAGates, William H. III Microsoft 2 Buffett, Warren Edward 33, married Omaha, Ne investmentsBuffett, Warren Edward 3 Allen, Paul Gardner 28, singleMercer Island, WA MicrosoftAllen, Paul Gardner 4 Ellison, Lawrence Joseph 21, divorced Atherton, CAEllison, Lawrence Joseph Oracle 5 Walton, Alice L. 17, divorced Fort Worth, TXWalton, Alice L. Wal-Mart 29 Moore, Gordon Earle 5, married Woodside, CAMoore, Gordon Earle Intel Source:

4 72, self made Source: technology, Intel (quote, executives, news) Net Worth: $5,300 mil Hometown: Woodside, CA Marital Status: married, 2 children Undergraduate: University of California Berkeley, Bachelor Graduate: California Institute of Technology, PhDtechnologyquoteexecutivesnews Author of "Moore's Law": Power of microchips doubles every year (later amended to every 2 years). Developed first integrated circuit at Fairchild Semiconductor in 1950s, cofounded Intel with Robert Noyce (d. 1990), venture capitalist Arthur Rock. Intel now world leader in microchips (annual sales, $30 billion), but Silicon Valley's linchpin lately slipping; stepped down as Intel's chairman emeritus; gave half of fortune to Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to support the environment, education and science. Source: #29, Moore, Gordon Earle (2001)

5 71, self made Source: Technology, Intel Corp. Net Worth: $26,000 mil Hometown: Woodside, California Marital Status: married, 2 children Education: Law from Cal Tech Silicon Valley legend who stumbled upon the integrated circuit and later formulated the oft- cited Moore's Law: the power of the microchip doubles every year (later amended to every 2 years). Started Intel in 1968 with Robert Noyce (d. 1990) and $2.5 million from venture capitalist Arthur Rock. First-year sales: $3,000. Last year: $29 billion. Most of that comes from PC microprocessor sales, but moving into wireless communications, networking products. Along with Microsoft, Intel became the first Nasdaq company to join the Dow Jones industrial average last year. Moore remains chairman emeritus. Caltech grad took job researching weapons propulsion at Johns Hopkins; moved into semiconductors. With wife, Betty, gave $35 million to Conservation International for research center and $12.5 million to Cambridge University for a new science library. Member since 1982Technology Source: #5, Moore, Gordon Earle (2000)

6 Source: forbes.com/2000/11/17/1117faces.html People Forbes Faces: Gordon Moore Betsy Schiffman, Forbes.com, , 11:43 AM ET SILICON VALLEY - Gordon Moore has been known to search the universe for signs of intelligent life. Now he's hoping to improve intelligent life here on Earth.Forbes.com The co-founder and chairman emeritus of Intel (nasdaq: INTC - news - people) announced this week that he's giving away $5 billion--nearly one-fifth of his wealth--to create a foundation that funds scientific, environmental and educational ventures. The foundation, to be called the Gordon E. and Betty I. Moore Foundation, will be based in San Francisco and will begin operations early next year. Overseeing the foundation will be Lewis Coleman, former chairman of Banc of America Securities. There's no doubt that Moore's name will live on through the new foundation, which is expected to be one of the nation's largest. But it's not like 71-year-old Moore needs it. He already immortalized his name in 1965 when he predicted that the number of transistors on a chip would double every year. The prediction proved so accurate it became known as "Moore's Law." (Moore updated the law in 1995 to double once every two years.) Moore was chief executive of Intel from 1975 until 1987, but he's first and foremost a scientist. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry and physics from the California Institute of Technology and planned to become a chemist. Instead, he became one of the pioneers of the semiconductor industry, serving as director of research and development at Fairchild Semiconductor before leaving to found Intel in Moore hasn't given up on science, though. He became one of the principal backers of Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence when its funding was cut by Congress in SETI calls its Project Phoenix, "the Earth's most comprehensive hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence."INTCnewspeople

7 Source:

8 Gates's Law "The speed of software halves every 18 months." This oft-cited law is an ironic comment on the tendency of software bloat to outpace the every-18-month doubling in hardware capacity per dollar predicted by Moore's Law. The reference is to Bill GatesMoore's Law The Jargon Dictionary - Scientific American four-part interview with Gordon Moore:


Download ppt "Moore’s Law In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors per integrated circuit would double every 18 months. Moore made his famous observation."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google