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Math s  How do we teach it?  Why do we teach it like that?  What do the written methods look like?  What can you do at home to help?

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Presentation on theme: "Math s  How do we teach it?  Why do we teach it like that?  What do the written methods look like?  What can you do at home to help?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Math s  How do we teach it?  Why do we teach it like that?  What do the written methods look like?  What can you do at home to help?

2 How do our children learn in Maths lessons at Orleans? Encouraged to use mental calculation methods Practise recall of number facts to become quicker and more accurate They are more aware of the strategies they use to calculate Focus on correct use of vocabulary and talk for learning Real - life, contextual learning Practical and engaging lessons – fascinators ! CB ' s CB ' s

3 ‘ I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.’ ( A Chinese proverb ) ‘ It just doesn ’ t look like it did in my day.’

4 Until fairly recently, maths was taught using Victorian era methods. Were you one of the lucky ones? Logical and strong with numbers?

5  Vast numbers of clerks to perform calculations every day. Victorian Times  Today, calculators and spreadsheets can do this car quicker, so the need for everybody to be able to do big calculations by hand has largely disappeared That ’ s not to say we don ’ t need strong number skills !

6 We are inundated by numbers all the time…

7 Probably not…but we do need to know that : 27 x 43 is roughly 30 x 40 and… that this is roughly 1,200 It ' s partly the need to have a good feel for numbers that is behind the modern methods. Do we all need to be able to work out 27 x 43 precisely with a pen and paper?

8 National Numeracy Strategy 1999 The revolution in the teaching of maths at primary school kicked in with this strategy. The emphasis moved away from blindly following rules ( remember borrowing one from the next column and paying back? ) towards techniques a child understood

9 The Aim for children to do mathematics in their heads, and if the numbers are too large, to use pencil and paper to avoid losing track. To do this children need to learn quick and efficient methods, including mental methods and appropriate written methods.

10 Mathematics is foremost an activity of the mind ; written calculations are an aid to that mental activity. Learning written methods is not the ultimate aim.

11 We want children to ask themselves : 1. Can I do this in my head? 2. Can I do this in my head with the help of drawings or jottings? 3. Do I need to use an expanded or compact written method? 4. Do I need a calculator?

12 A sledgehammer to crack a nut ! x

13 Additi on

14 Y 3 Programme : To add mentally combinations of 1- digit and 2- digit numbers Develop written methods to record, support or explain addition of 2- digit and 3- digit numbers Y 4 Programme : To add mentally pairs of 2- digit numbers To refine and use efficient written methods to add 2- digit and 3- digit numbers and £. p Addition – progression

15 How would you solve these? ● ● ● ●

16 Partitioning = 81

17 Number line = =38

18 Use the number line to work these out… = = = =

19 Column Method Leadi ng to Expande d Compact

20 Subtra ction

21 Subtraction - progression Y 3 Programme :  To subtract mentally combinations of 1- digit and 2- digit numbers  Develop written methods to record, support or explain subtraction of 2- digit and 3- digit numbers  Y 4 Programme :  To subtract mentally pairs of 2- digit numbers  To refine and use efficient written methods to subtract 2- digit and 3- digit numbers and £. p

22 ● 67 – 59 ● ● How would you solve these?

23 Number line Subtraction as taking away 30 – 17 =

24 5 12 Difference Subtraction as finding the difference

25 Number line Subtraction as finding the difference Jump to next multiple of 10 Count the jumps = – 18 =

26 Column Method

27 Use the number line to work these out… 48 – 31 = =

28 Multipl ication

29 Y 3 Programme : Multiply one digit and two digit numbers by 10 or 100 and describe the effect ; Derive and recall multiplication facts for the 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10 times tables ; Use informal and practical methods to multiply two digit numbers e. g. 13 x 3. Y 4 Programme : Multiply numbers to 1000 by 10 and then 100 and describe the effect ; Derive and recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10; Use written methods to multiply a two digit number by a one digit number e. g. 15 x 9. Multiplication - progression

30 How would you solve these? ● 24  50 ● 24  4 ● 24  15 ● 136  9

31 Number line Multiplication as repeated addition 4 x 2 = So, 2 x 4 = x

32 Arrays 3 x 6 A dd the dots Or

33 What multiplica tion are these arrays showing?

34 Partitioning 24 x 5 20 x 5 = x 5 = = 120

35 Grid Method 24 x x = 120 BBC News Video Link

36 Expanded Multiplicati on 38 x (30 x 7) (8 x 7)

37 Use the grid method to work these out : 24 x x = x x 3

38 Divis ion

39 Y 3 Programme : Use practical and informal written methods to divide two - digit numbers ( e. g. 50 ÷ 4); Y 4 Programme : Develop and use written methods to record, support and explain division of two - digit numbers by a one - digit number, including division with remainders ( e. g. 98 ÷ 6) Division - progression

40 How would you solve these? ● 123  3 ● 165  10 ● 325  25 ● 623  24

41 Division

42 Arrays First group of 3 12 ÷ 3 = 4

43 Repeated subtractio n – 3 – 3 – 3 12÷ 3 = 4

44 Counting in steps ÷ 3 = 4 Add the jumps Fingers “6“6 “9“9 “12 ” “3”“3” + 3

45 Chunking (10 x 5) (5 x 5) 0 75 ÷ 5 = ÷ x 5 5 x 5 Need to know table s ! BBC News Video Link


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