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Www.intel.com/research Intel Research Christine Riley Intel Research Oct. 8, 2004 People and Practices: Informing the Strategy of a Technology Organization.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.intel.com/research Intel Research Christine Riley Intel Research Oct. 8, 2004 People and Practices: Informing the Strategy of a Technology Organization."— Presentation transcript:

1 Intel Research Christine Riley Intel Research Oct. 8, 2004 People and Practices: Informing the Strategy of a Technology Organization

2 Intel Research 2 What is Intel Research?  An organization within the Corporate Technology Group (CTG) chartered to build the technical leadership, knowledge assets and systems perspective to make Intel the preeminent driver of emerging information technologies. Key goals are:  Establish Intel as a Research Leader in Ubiquitous Computing: Software, Systems, Networking and Applications Research  Build and develop Intel’s networks in the research and university communities in order to identify ‘disruptive’ technologies and events taking place outside of Intel  Gain systems perspective through prototyping and data driven analysis  Lay the groundwork for sustainable technical leadership and make Intel a leader in Internet-era research

3 Intel Research 3 What is unique about Intel Research?  Research is largely exploratory  Off roadmap  7-15 years out on timeline  Innovative collaborative model engaging with key Universities  “Lablets” – Intel blue badge facilities co-located on University campus to facilitate collaboration  Open Collaborative Agreements signed with Universities  Strategic Research Projects inside Intel  Technology transfer mechanism from open collaborative research  Proprietary exploratory research outside scope of any business unit  Includes focus on human side of technology  Internal People and Practices Research Lab  Alignment of University engagements  Research Council, Academic Relations, Labs, Visiting Faculty, etc.

4 Intel Research 4 PaPR - Who We Are People and Practices Research (PaPR)  Expand Intel’s business opportunities by providing detailed, holistic understandings of the motivations, practices and institutions of people that will shape and be shaped by Intel’s technology  Multi-disciplinary team of anthropologists, psychologists, interaction designers, and engineers Intel Research  Long-term research into emerging and disruptive technologies, centered on addressing the challenges in a vision of ubiquitous, proactive computing

5 Intel Research 5 Our Mission Enabling a robust ubiquitous / proactive computing future by “Getting out and getting real”  Generating a broad, robust understanding of “systems”  Beyond technology components to the human, social, cultural, economic and political systems they interact with.  These systems are often emergent, unplanned, unpredicted.  Identifying broad application spaces (the archaeological survey model),  Developing and evaluating new usage models (archaeological digs)  Engaging with lead users in new and previously underdeveloped domains.

6 Intel Research 6 Ethnography: the recording of human culture

7 Intel Research 7 Our Perspective  First and foremost, human-centered, ethnographic and design-oriented:  Understanding human needs and desires  Understanding the ways people and technologies affect each other.  A global approach:  Importance of cultural factors / worldwide opportunities  A critical approach:  What unspoken assumptions about end users are built into technologies?  A pragmatic, opportunistic approach  Where are the vaguely understood, emergent trends and opportunities? Where isn’t everybody else looking?

8 Intel Research 8 Our Method

9 Intel Research 9 From Mobility to Ubiquity: Recurrent Themes

10 Intel Research 10 Understanding mobility professionals in terms of ► people ► environments ► activities ► objects and how all of these interact beyond laptops, cell phones & wireless internet access

11 11 A simple framework People Practices Environments Objects

12 12 A simple framework People Practices Environments –Macro – infrastructure, climate, geography –Micro – posture, ambient light, etc. –Temporal – attention, duration –Social / cultural - appropriateness Objects

13 : “fish and chips” Goal: build on “anywhere in the home” research to drive computing into work environments beyond the desktop oasis. Key insights (“knowledge work” happens everywhere) –Informal communication –Documenting “in the flow”

14 : “fish and chips” Goal: build on “anywhere in the home” research to drive computing into work environments beyond the desktop oasis. Key insights (“knowledge work” happens everywhere) –Informal communication –Documenting “in the flow” –Awareness

15 : “fish and chips” Goal: build on “anywhere in the home” research to drive computing into work environments beyond the desktop oasis. Key insights (“knowledge work” happens everywhere) –Informal communication –Documenting “in the flow” –Awareness –Technologies that are robust, self-reliant and self-organizing

16 : “road warriors”, “around town” Goal: to understand and lead in the shift to mobile Key insights –The “jazz” of going mobile: planning and improvisation

17 : “road warriors”, “around town” Goal: to understand and lead in the shift to mobile Key insights –The “jazz” of going mobile: planning and improvisation –The origins of digital content = self and close associates

18 : “road warriors”, “around town” Goal: to understand and lead in the shift to mobile Key insights –The “jazz” of going mobile: planning and improvisation –The origins of digital content = self and close associates –Balancing “here and now” with the remote but important

19 /2: a global perspective Scandinavia – fluid coordination

20 /2: a global perspective Scandinavia – fluid coordination Japan – an explosion of devices

21 /2: a global perspective Scandinavia – fluid coordination Japan – an explosion of devices Korea – pockets of intensified use

22 /2: a global perspective Scandinavia – fluid coordination Japan – an explosion of devices Korea – pockets of intensified use UK – the relationship between mobile technology and the experience of place

23 /2: a global perspective Scandinavia – fluid coordination Japan – an explosion of devices Korea – pockets of intensified use UK – technology and place Morocco – the role of mobile tech in economic development

24 /3: “ubicomp at work” Goal: to understand the role of ubicomp in work environments under-served by technology Key insights: –Manufacturing: environmental constraints informal knowledge sharing

25 /3: “ubicomp at work” Goal: to understand the role of ubicomp in work environments under-served by technology Key insights: –Manufacturing –Agriculture: Multiple perspectives on common processes

26 /3: “ubicomp at work” Goal: to understand the role of ubicomp in work environments under-served by technology Key insights: –Manufacturing –Agriculture –Retail: Technology in daily transactions

27 Intel Research Back to global perspectives

28 28 ASMO EMEA APAC IJKK the world is more complicated than this map suggests hypothesis: that there are strong cultural variations in the aspirations, needs, desires and lifestyles of the ‘new rich’ in APAC, and that these variations have important implications for the design, innovation and marketing of new technologies. research strategy: identify new users and new usages and new usage models for computing technologies in APAC through multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in 7 APAC geographies with focus on urban early adopters (ie: middle class, new rich)

29 29 Inside Asia

30 30 education is important everywhere education means different things in different Asian cultures –for upward social mobility (for self and family) or stability (filial piety) –as a fulfillment of cultural expectations –as part of cultural/religious training rich technology ecology is playing an increasing role in education and life-long learning. PCs, the internet and public web-kiosks all provide access to content and curriculum

31 31 families are important to everyone strong values placed on extended family, social relationships, networks, and sociality. new technologies are helping remap family and other social relations –keeping up relationships over long distances through chat, SMS –using internet to participate in festivals and social activities –allowing social reciprocities

32 32 IT is a portal to your government Asian governments make strong implicit & explicit statements about value of new technologies. many govts. creating strong online presences & public access points –policies and agendas re: technology –encouraging participation in ‘technology’ revolution –e-government agendas (including movement of services online)

33 33 new technologies & religious practices co-exist in Asia ICTs are also supporting and becoming incorporated into religious and spiritual practices –SMS notifications of auspicious dates and activities –Quiblat and salat notifications (www.ilkonetel.com)www.ilkonetel.com –blessing of objects –Online burial/mortuary sites (i.e: re-thinking of cultural work of technology

34 34 The Next 10% - shared access

35 35 The Next 10% - Village Computing

36 Business Model: Use Local Entrepreneurs to drive ICT  Entrepreneur-driven operator assisted telephone booths (STD PCOs) introduced in India in 1987 Today in urban areas:  950,000 such PCOs covering every street of smallest town  generate 25 % of total telecom income  300 million people use these PCOs  Lesson for Rural: To serve Rural people with incomes less than $ 1/day, aggregate demand and let Entrepreneurs drive it Aid/ Grant does not scale Successful Enterprises can scale to all villages

37  n-Logue : A Rural Service Provider aggregate demand into a kiosk owned & driven by a local entrepreneur $1000 (including taxes) per Kiosk providing telephone, Internet, multimedia PC with web-camera, printer and power back-up for PC  plus Indian language software, video conferencing software, training and maintenance set up by a village entrepreneur on the lines of urban PCOs  provides telephone, stand-alone Computer and Internet services  needs $75 per month to break even (7cents per person per month) Innovative Business Models

38 Kiosk: Bouquet of Services (besides telephony) Learning typing Computer education Photography movies on CD DTP work /voice & video mail E-Government Video conferencing providing  Tele-medicine  Vet Care  E-learning  E-Agriculture

39 39 Sustaining Cultural Identity and maintaining economic sustainability through bits and bytes in Nepal

40 40 Happy goat recipient

41 41 Intel Pentium 4

42 42 Happy Father’s day-”Buba Ko Mukh Herne Din”

43 43 Dear Thamel.com family, Simply Brought tears to my eyes after looking at my father’s picture whom I have not seen in 13+ years…thank you thamel.com you made my father’s day this year very very special. Who would have thought one day I would be able to look at my father’s face on “buba ko mukh herne din.” Kamala Shrestha USA

44 Intel Research 44 Strategic Value  Identify & Incubate Usage Models & Capabilities  Inform Product Planning  Infuse New Ways of Thinking about Computing/Communications into Strategy  Uncover New Worldwide Market Opportunities  Proliferate Methods for Breakthrough Innovation


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