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FIE 2011 Robin S. Adams, Ruth A. Streveler Purdue University.

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Presentation on theme: "FIE 2011 Robin S. Adams, Ruth A. Streveler Purdue University."— Presentation transcript:

1 FIE 2011 Robin S. Adams, Ruth A. Streveler Purdue University

2  Please assign a code (numbers or words) you will use to on both pre- and post- workshop surveys (so we can match your two responses)

3  Translate research ideas and interests into everyday language that can engage and excite potential collaborators  Identify expertise needs and communities for finding potential collaborators  Describe strategies for making the most of first “cultural” exchanges in developing cross- disciplinary research collaborations.

4 We’re going to use a “want ad” as a tool to help you identify future collaborators outside of your field of expertise, effectively communicate your project to them, and prepare you for your first “cultural” exchange with your new collaborators

5 Think – Pair - Share  What is stopping you from looking for collaborators outside your area of expertise?  What experiences have you had in finding collaborators?  What are some of your lessons learned?

6  Rejection (ouch) – They don’t have time – This isn’t a priority for them – Not clear what is in it for them – Can’t understand the project  Didn’t know where to look or how to get started  Found someone – but collaboration was “complicated” (different language, methods, ideas about evidence, values)

7 This is about learning…  Nothing ventured, nothing gained – Don’t be afraid to talk to someone – Engage them in a conversation about their work  Focus on developing a relationship – Find ways to spend time together, to get to know each other – Describe how their work is helping you with your own work – Become a resource for each other – mutual benefits – Be clear about what you want so you can use their time well

8 This is about learning…  Find pragmatic start points – Link to a local resource where can meet face to face – Is there a student of theirs you can fund? – Can you do a pilot to get to know each other? – Be willing to give it the time it needs

9  Cycle 1 – Look inward. How to talk about your own stuff with a wider audience.  Cycle 2 – Look outward. What do YOU want in a collaborator?  Cycle 3 - Finding communities. Knowing where to go to find these people.  Cycle 4 – What do you do when they answer the ad? Preparing for your first “cultural” exchange

10 How to talk about your own stuff with a wider audience. – Identify characteristics of effective ways to communicate your research (examples from Stanford I-RITE) – Craft a short statement for you “want ad” – Use members of the workshop who are not in your same discipline to get feedback about your statements.

11 What do you notice in these examples?

12 Herein we report a facile synthesis method using surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a capping agent for controlling the crystal size and morphology of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) crystals in aqueous systems. The particle sizes can be precisely adjusted from ca. 100 nm to 4 μm, and the morphology can be changed from truncated cubic to rhombic dodecahedron.

13 People living near a major airport know that when an airplane flies overhead, the noise created is loud enough to rattle dishes and wake them up. My research attempts to develop a method to predict the noise so that quieter engines can be designed. A big problem in reducing airplane noise is that it is very expensive and time consuming to experimentally test an airplane, determine its noise, and correct the design if necessary. Computers are beginning to show promise in predicting airplane noise by simulating some air motion around an airplane and/or its engines, but they do not yet have enough capability to simulate the entire airplane and its engines. Instead, individual components of the airplane are simulated, such as the jet engine exhaust, and examined in detail. Even at this simplified level, today's computers are not fast enough and big enough to simulate realistic conditions. To account for this, computer models, similar to those used in meteorology, are used to simplify the calculation and make it feasible to solve relatively simple problems. My research focuses on creating a model that can help predict the noise generated by jet engine exhaust, making it easier to incorporate design changes, thus saving time and money and allowing quieter jets to be produced.

14 Important things to notice:  People are “different” (language, styles of communicating, values, methods)  How you communicate is based on your assumptions about your “audience” Attending to “communicating across differences”  What looks like “everyday language” to you, looks like “jargon” to someone else  You have to educate others to understand your work (e.g., use examples)  You need to connect to “where they are coming from”  This takes practice…it’s more difficult than you think

15  Think of a project in which you would like to collaborate with someone outside your field of expertise  In your want ad you need to describe your project – What will be the name of the project? – What are 3-5 statements to describe the project?

16  Find a partner  Constructive feedback – Clear – Specific - avoid general comments and clarify pronouns such as “it”, “that”, etc. – Provides specific examples and suggestions for improvement – Provide positive reinforcement  Rewrite…

17  Cycle 1 – Look inward. How to talk about your own stuff with a wider audience.  Cycle 2 – Look outward. What do YOU want in a collaborator?  Cycle 3 - Finding communities. Knowing where to go to find these people.  Cycle 4 – What do you do when they answer the ad? Preparing for your first “cultural” exchange

18  What do YOU want in a collaborator? – Where does your expertise end? – What types of help do you need? – What are qualities you are looking for? – What are the benefits to the collaborator?  Add to your “want ad”

19  Find a partner  Constructive feedback – Clear – Specific - avoid general comments and clarify pronouns such as “it”, “that”, etc. – Provides specific examples and suggestions for improvement – Provide positive reinforcement  Rewrite…

20  Cycle 1 – Look inward. How to talk about your own stuff with a wider audience.  Cycle 2 – Look outward. What do YOU want in a collaborator?  Cycle 3 - Finding communities. Knowing where to go to find these people.  Cycle 4 – What do you do when they answer the ad? Preparing for your first “cultural” exchange

21 Think – Pair - Share

22  Intentional serendipity – chance comes to the prepared mind  Identify local expertise Be a sleuth: Walk around the hallways, read notices, what kinds of work do they do in that program? Be a sleuth: Walk around the hallways, read notices, what kinds of work do they do in that program? – Get around: Get on seminar notices for programs on campus – Go to a hub: Is there a teaching and learning center than can point you in a direction? – Use your network: Are there engineering education people you can talk to? – Ask questions: Who are the “connectors” – the people who know other people and connect people?

23 GEECS website (updated frequently): page/ /Engineering%20Education%20Co mmunities%20and%20Societies GEECS website (updated frequently): page/ /Engineering%20Education%20Co mmunities%20and%20Societies page/ /Engineering%20Education%20Co mmunities%20and%20Societies page/ /Engineering%20Education%20Co mmunities%20and%20Societies

24  Cycle 1 – Look inward. How to talk about your own stuff with a wider audience.  Cycle 2 – Look outward. What do YOU want in a collaborator?  Cycle 3 - Finding communities. Knowing where to go to find these people.  Cycle 4 – What do you do when they answer the ad? Preparing for your first “cultural” exchange

25 Strategies to make the most of your first cross-disciplinary “cultural” exchange

26  “you talk different” – iterative communication process  Be a learner AND an educator – engage in self-directed learning process

27  Build trust, shared ownership – create common ground – Respect difficulty of their training – Honor alternative ways of knowing, no way is better than the other  Engage in critical reflection on your own beliefs, be open to new ways of thinking

28  Practice “getting to know someone” – Opening statements – Follow up on words that are unfamiliar to you – Educate others about what you do (in everyday language) – Look for common ground, shared interests, passions  Practice your want ad – Does it spark interest?

29  One-on-one consultation with participants.

30

31 DUE


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