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1 Act 51: The Reinventing Education Act of 2004 What it means for students.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Act 51: The Reinventing Education Act of 2004 What it means for students."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Act 51: The Reinventing Education Act of 2004 What it means for students

2 2 Is this the school you want your child to attend? Children come to school able and ready to learn. Children come to a school that is a safe haven, conducive to learning. Children come to a school that has caring and competent teachers, effective staff, and effective leaders. A standards-based education delivered through instructional practices that meets children’s needs enables them to be high achievers.

3 3 Children come to school able and ready to learn Children have a nurturing home environment – value system says education is important – children have enough sleep – children are healthy and eat nutritiously – parents set the right expectations – parents provide physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual support – ethical values pervade the home

4 4 … that is a safe haven, conducive to learning High expectations are clearly defined for students and adults. Children and adults feel safe. Adults are in charge. Parents support and respect the adults in charge. Facilities are clean, adequate, and appropriate. Supplies are adequate. Technology and other learning resources are adequate. The school culture is nurturing. Students and adults feel a sense of belonging.

5 5 … that has caring and competent teachers and effective staff Teachers are highly qualified and effective. A collaborative learning environment is focused on student achievement. There is a culture of continuous improvement based on trust and respect. Adults and children are responsible for their own appropriate behavior. Everyone makes a difference every day. Learning is valued and practiced by everyone.

6 6 A standards-based education delivered through instructional practices that meets children’s needs enables them to be high achievers. Each school complex provides an articulated curriculum that makes K-20 education seamless. Curriculum and instruction incorporate best practices. Smaller learning communities include magnet schools and career-oriented academies. Schools are accountable for student achievement and continuous quality improvement. Parents and students can choose schools without geographic limitations.

7 7 How does Act 51 get us there? State Office Sets the standards for student achievement – what students need to know, be able to do, and care about. Schools Determine how to meet the standards. Base their curriculum and instruction on student data and research.

8 8 What is the End State?

9 9 How does Act 51 do this? Schools get resources based on student needs (weighted student formula). “Resources” are dollars, not positions. Schools analyze student data, research strategies, develop academic and financial plans (budgets), implement, monitor, and report (accountability). State office has two roles: – Allocate resources, monitor and report results. – Provide support for schools.

10 10 How does Act 51 do this? State Office Allocate resources, monitor and report results. Provide support for schools. Schools Schools get resources based on student needs (weighted student formula). “Resources” are dollars, not positions. Schools analyze student data, research strategies, develop academic and financial plans (budgets), implement, monitor, and report (accountability). Schools get resources based on student needs (weighted student formula). “Resources” are dollars, not positions. Schools analyze student data, research strategies, develop academic and financial plans (budgets), implement, monitor, and report (accountability).

11 11 What are the challenges? Burdens of history: – Focus on inputs, not outcomes. – Technology does not track students longitudinally – no system-wide data on individual student achievement. – Categorical funds restrict flexibility of schools. – Contractual provisions limit flexibility of schools. Everyone must change, and change is

12 12 Changes for principals Must know what data to analyze and how to analyze it. Must identify alternative research-based strategies for improving student achievement, given the student data. Must select the preferred strategy, justify the selection, and build an academic plan around the strategy. Must prepare a financial plan (budget) based on the academic plan (to improve student achievement). For some schools, resources will be reduced. Must review student data and financial data during implementation. Must work with school community councils. Must work under 3-year performance contracts: expectations for the principal are explicit.

13 13 Changes for Principals

14 14 Changes for state office DOE responsible for personnel management functions for 6,000 civil service employees effective July 1, DAGS employees move to DOE effective July 1, 2005 to handle school maintenance and repairs. Resources will be controlled by principals, not by program managers. Schools may purchase services from vendors other than the state office: state office services will need to be competitive with outside vendors in quality and price. Budget, accounting, personnel, and technology systems will be revised to reflect school-based decision-making. State office staff will shrink as personnel move to the district offices and schools.

15 15 Changes for the Board of Education Act 51 does not mandate consequential changes for the BOE. A high-performing BOE will hasten the benefits of Act 51: – Determine which handful of significant indicators to watch. – Monitor outcomes. – Support the Superintendent’s efforts to reinvent education. – Celebrate success and encourage continuous improvement.

16 16 Changes for principals Must know what data to analyze and how to analyze it. Must identify alternative research-based strategies for improving student achievement, given the student data. Must select the preferred strategy, justify the selection, and build an academic plan around the strategy. Must prepare a financial plan (budget) based on the academic plan (to improve student achievement). For some schools, resources will be reduced. Must review student data and financial data during implementation. Must work with school community councils. Must work under 3-year performance contracts: expectations for the principal are explicit.

17 17 Who is on a school community council? Equal numbers of DOE employees and non-DOE employees –DOE employees: principal, teachers, other school staff –Non-DOE employees: students, parents, community members Selection/election process

18 18 School community councils – what do they do? Advise the principals on: – academic and financial plans – repair and maintenance needs Advise the complex area superintendent on principals’ performance. Participate in the selection of principals. Provide collaborative opportunities for input and consultation. Request waivers from policies, rules, etc.

19 19 Act 51 empowers. It cannot compel excellence. Act 51 empowers the DOE to shift from a command-and-control organization to one that supports schools. Act 51 empowers principals and school communities to develop the best schools for their students. You can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make it drink.

20 20 Act 51 is not a panacea Act 51 does not provide more funds to schools. Act 51 does not itself improve curriculum or instruction. Act 51 does not compel parents to be engaged in their children’s education. Act 51 does not provide for appropriate student assessment.

21 21 Act 51 benefits will not materialize overnight. But in the long run (10 years?), public schools will be different from what they are today, and from each other.

22 22

23 23 Albert Einstein’s quotations: “The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education.” “If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?” “Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” “Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.” It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.”

24 24 The purpose of education “The illiterate of the future will not be the person who cannot read; it will be the person who does not know how to learn.” – Alvin Toffler “The aim of education should be to teach us rather how to think than what to think – rather … to enable us to think for ourselves than to load the memory with the thoughts of other men.” – Bill Beattie “The object of education is to prepare the young to educate themselves throughout their lives.” – Robert M. Hutchins “Education is not a preparation for life; education is life itself.” – John Dewey “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.” - Plutarch

25 25 Why Act 51? “Insanity is doing things the way they have always been done and expecting the results to be different.” – Theodore Eischeid


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