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…And How it Differs from Argument Excerpted with permission from: PROSE STYLES: TOUGH, SWEET AND STUFFY by Don Nilsen and “Argument,” compiled by J. A.

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Presentation on theme: "…And How it Differs from Argument Excerpted with permission from: PROSE STYLES: TOUGH, SWEET AND STUFFY by Don Nilsen and “Argument,” compiled by J. A."— Presentation transcript:

1 …And How it Differs from Argument Excerpted with permission from: PROSE STYLES: TOUGH, SWEET AND STUFFY by Don Nilsen and “Argument,” compiled by J. A. Stanford, Jr.

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8 21 8 POINT OF VIEW: THE NOVEL:THE AD:THE TEXT BOOK: ETHOSPATHOSLOGOS TOUGH SWEETSTUFFY 1 ST PERSON2 ND PERSON3 RD PERSON SUBJECTIVESUBJECTIVEOBJECTIVE INFORMALINTIMATEFORMAL

9 21 9 Sweet language is the language of advertisors. Walker Gibson calls this language AROMA (Advertising Rhetoric of Madison Avenue). Sweet language is listener-oriented in an attempt to seduce listeners into buying products they don’t want or need.

10 21 10 It is language full of innovative spellings, creative grammar, and wild punctuation. Sweet writing contains many sentence fragments, and would rather flaunt a grammatical rule than conform to it: “Winston tastes good like a cigarette should. What do you want, good grammar, or good taste?”

11 21 11 Sweet language is the language of sensationalism, the language of superlatives and hyperbole. It is the language of diversion; it plays tricks on the reader with its puns, its word coinages, its humor, its packaging, its sex, and other aspects which have nothing to do with the product itself. It is informal, or sometimes even intimate or cutesy in tone.

12 21 12 Contractions, clippings, blendings, and deletions abound, making it all the more cryptic and intimate. It’s full of slang expressions like “no doubt about it,” “cut it out,” and “where else?” It can be cutesy, as in “Dry skin? Not me, darling. Every inch of little me is as smooth as (well, you know what).”

13 21 13 Gibson says that a common kind of coinage in sweet language is the noun-adjunct construction (a noun modified by another noun). We see this kind of coinage in “Speakerphone,” “Fooderama living,” “decorator colors,” and “Supermarket selection.” The Bell Company praises the beauties of its “hands-free, group-talk, across-the-room telephone.

14 21 14 SUMMARY OF WORD DEVELOPMENT: THE NOVEL:THE AD:THE TEXT BOOK: COLLOQUIALCOLLOQUIALFORMAL SLANG: CHARACTER SLANG: AD NO SLANG DEPENDENT MODALS GERUNDS INFINITIVES PERFECTS PROGRESSIVES SPELLING =SPELLINGS =SPELLINGS = CHARACTERSCREATIVECORRECT ANGLO-SAXONANGLO-SAXONINKHORN TERMS WORDSWORDSGREEK & LATIN

15 21 15 SUMMARY OF SENTENCE DEVELOPMENT: THE NOVEL:THE AD:THE TEXT BOOK: SHORT, CHOPPYLONG, COMPLICATED FRAGMENTSPERFECT GRAMMAR COMMA SPLICES SIMPLESIMPLELONG & COMPLEX CASUAL PUNCTUATIONPERFECT PUNCTUATION RHETORICALSENTENCES DON’T QUESTIONSMAKE CLAIMS BEYOND IMPERATIVESEVIDENCE THEY,YOU,

16 21 16 SUMMARY OF USE OF FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE THE NOVEL:THE AD:THE TEXT BOOK: AUTHOR PARTICIPANT?AUTHOR AUTHOR OBSERVANTOBSERVANT AUTHOR OMNISCIENT MAINLY TROPES:MAINLY SCHEMES:LITERAL IN MEDIAS RESALLITERATION METAPHORASSONANCE IRONYRHYME POETIC JUSTICECUTESY TONE SIMILES ALLEGORIES


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