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Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye Vody Stavropol Territory Teacher Lola Ahmedovna Vaganova. April, 2007 Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye.

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Presentation on theme: "Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye Vody Stavropol Territory Teacher Lola Ahmedovna Vaganova. April, 2007 Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye."— Presentation transcript:

1 Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye Vody Stavropol Territory Teacher Lola Ahmedovna Vaganova. April, 2007 Olga Kumskova Form 10 A School №7 Mineralnye Vody Stavropol Territory Teacher Lola Ahmedovna Vaganova. April, 2007

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3 The United Kingdom of Great Britain consists of four countries: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Each country has its own capital, language and symbol. The symbol of England is a red rose. The symbol of Scotland is a thistle. The symbol of Wales is a daffodil. And the symbol of Northern Ireland is a shamrock.

4 National Anthem Of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland God save our gracious Queen, Long live our noble Queen, God Save the Queen! Send her victorious, Happy and Glorious, Long to reign over us; God Save the Queen! O Lord our God arise, Scatter her enemies And make them fall; Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks, On Thee our hopes we fix, Oh, save us all! Thy choicest gifts in store On her be pleased to pour; Long may she reign; May she defend our laws, And ever give us cause To sing with heart and voice, God save the Queen!

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6 The rose first became the symbol of England when Henry III married Eleanor of Provence and the golden rose of Provence became England’s new floral symbol. From this golden rose eventually came the red rose of the House of Lancaster and the white rose of the House of York.

7 National costumes. Although England is a country rich in folklore and traditions, it has no definitive "national" costume. The most well-known folk costumes are those of the Morris dancers. They can be seen in many country villages during the summer months performing folk dances that once held ritualistic and magical meanings associated with the awakening of the earth.

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9 The national flower of Wales is usually considered to be the daffodil, which is traditionally worn on St. David’s Day. However, the humble leek is also considered to be a traditional emblem of Wales, possibly because its colors, white over green, echo the ancient Welsh standard.

10 The national costume of Wales is based on the peasant costume of the 18th and 19th centuries. Because Wales was isolated geographically from the rest of Britain, many of the individual traits of costume and materials were retained in Welsh dress long after they had died out elsewhere.

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12 There is a legend that, in 1010 when they attempted to capture Scotland, the Danes landed secretly at night. As they approached Stains Castle they removed their shoes to avoid making any noise. When they reached the castle’s moat, they jumped in not realizing that the moat was dry and overgrown with thistles. The screams of the bare-footed Danes roused the garrison. The castle and Scotland were both saved and, according to legend, it is in memory of that night that the thistle became the floral emblem of Scotland.

13 The Flag of Scotland, the Saltire or St Andrew's Cross, dates from the 9th century, and is thus the oldest national flag still in use, and it can be found flying all over Scotland. The Saltire now also forms part of the design of the Union Flag. Flag of Scotland9th century flag Union Flag of Scotland9th century flag Union Flag

14 The Royal Standard of Scotland, a banner showing the Royal Arms of Scotland, is also frequently to be seen, particularly at sporting events involving a Scottish team. Often called the Lion Rampant (after its chief heraldic device) it is technically the property of the monarch and its use by anybody else is illegal, although this is almost universally ignored, and never enforced. The Royal Standard of Scotland, a banner showing the Royal Arms of Scotland, is also frequently to be seen, particularly at sporting events involving a Scottish team. Often called the Lion Rampant (after its chief heraldic device) it is technically the property of the monarch and its use by anybody else is illegal, although this is almost universally ignored, and never enforced.Royal Standard of ScotlandbannerRoyal Arms of ScotlandLion RampantheraldicRoyal Standard of ScotlandbannerRoyal Arms of ScotlandLion Rampantheraldic

15 The unicorn is also used as a heraldic symbol of Scotland. The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, used prior to 1603 by the Kings of Scotland, incorporated a lion rampant shield supported by two unicorns. On the Union of the Crowns, the Arms were quartered with those of England and Ireland, and one unicorn was replaced by a lion (the supporters of England). unicornRoyal Coat of Arms of ScotlandKings of ScotlandlionrampantUnion of the Crowns EnglandIrelandunicornRoyal Coat of Arms of ScotlandKings of ScotlandlionrampantUnion of the Crowns EnglandIreland

16 It is not known what happened to the relics of St. Andrew, which were stored in St. Andrews Cathedral, although it is most likely that these were destroyed during the Scottish Reformation. A plaque, amongst the ruins, for visitors to see now marks the place where these relics were kept within the Cathedral at St. Andrews.

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18 The only "official" flag of Northern Ireland is the Union Flag. The Northern Ireland Flag (also known as the 'Ulster Banner' or 'Red Hand Flag') is no longer used officially by government, due to the abolition of the Parliament of Northern Ireland in The Ulster Banner, however, still remains the main de facto flag used to uniquely represent Northern Ireland. The Ulster Banner is based on the flag of Ulster. flag of Northern IrelandUnion FlagUlster BannerParliament of Northern Irelandflag of Ulsterflag of Northern IrelandUnion FlagUlster BannerParliament of Northern Irelandflag of Ulster

19 Patrick's Day is Ireland's greatest national holiday as well as a holy day. The date marks the anniversary of the death of the missionary who became the patron saint of Ireland. It is a happy holiday for the Irish wherever they may be - in Dublin, New York City, Boston, or San Francisco. The day celebrated with parades, speeches, festive dinners, and dances. Green is the color of the day, with thousands of little cloth shamrocks worn even by those whose forefathers never touched the shores of Ireland.

20 It is known that St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. At the age of sixteen, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family's estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity. During this time, he worked as a shepherd, outdoors and away from people. Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian.St. Patrick


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