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Midwest High Speed Rail Association September 19, 2014 Honorable Toni Preckwinkle, President Cook County Board of Commissioners Connecting Cook CountyConnecting.

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Presentation on theme: "Midwest High Speed Rail Association September 19, 2014 Honorable Toni Preckwinkle, President Cook County Board of Commissioners Connecting Cook CountyConnecting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Midwest High Speed Rail Association September 19, 2014 Honorable Toni Preckwinkle, President Cook County Board of Commissioners Connecting Cook CountyConnecting Cook County 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

2 Meeting Agenda Welcome and Project Background Why Embark on this Plan? Needs and Issues – Key themes Strategic Direction – Vision statement – Draft goals and objectives – Scenario development 2 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

3 A New Plan is Long Overdue 3 In 1940:  Peak travel happened on summer Sundays to the forest preserves  Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected President for a third time  The movie, The Grapes of Wrath, was released  Glenn Miller’s In the Mood was Song of the Year  A Plymouth Roadking auto cost $645

4 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS SOURCE: Partnering for Prosperity Why Embark on this Plan? 4 945 square miles127,868 businesses 5,194,675 people2,245,334 jobs

5 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS The Chicago metropolitan area has lagged the U.S. since the late 1990s And it is falling further behind during the current U.S. recovery Unemployment Rate 5 SOURCE: Bill Testa, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Growing our Regional Economy, December 12, 2013.

6 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Economic Performance: Job Growth 6 The region’s performance versus other Midwest MSAs is not great either…...even while metro area growth has been slipping among peer MSAs in other regions Job Growth (2000 – 2013) SOURCE: Bill Testa, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Growing our Regional Economy, December 12, 2013.

7 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Economic Performance: Per Capita Income 7 Per Capita Income: Chicago MSA/US (3 year rolling average) Per capita incomes have been sliding versus the nation Simulates job and business growth Creates stronger communities Improves quality of life SOURCE: Bill Testa, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Growing our Regional Economy, December 12, 2013.

8 NEEDS AND ISSUES 8

9 Theme: Align Public Infrastructure Investments with Industry Needs Incentivize private sector growth Maximize economic and employment opportunities Balance: established employment centers vs. redevelopment potential 9 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

10 Theme: Transportation Choice One solution is not enough! 10 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Travelers want and need multimodal solutions. Projects & Services Policies Programs Strategies

11 Theme: Plan for Freight 11 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Metropolitan Chicago's Freight Cluster: A Drill-Down Report on Infrastructure, Innovation, and Workforce

12 Theme: Policies are Critical Strong land use and zoning – Transit Oriented Development – Infill; redevelopment First- and last-mile connections Congestion pricing Can proceed whether or not more funding is available 12 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

13 Theme: Address Underserved Populations 13 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

14 Theme: Balance State of Good Repair with Capacity Expansion 14 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Existing Transportation Assets Expanding the System

15 Theme: Move Beyond Borders Transportation systems do not begin and end within county or municipal boundaries – Investments, policies, and strategies affect the entire transportation system serving the greater Chicago metropolitan area Leverage combined resources (financial, technical) to achieve shared interests 15 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

16 STRATEGIC DIRECTION 16

17 Vision Statement 17 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

18 Goal: Economic Opportunity Invest in transportation improvements that support the economic vitality of the County by fostering local and regional competitiveness and sustained productivity. 18 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

19 Goal: Accessibility and Reliability Increase the integration, connectivity and reliability of the transportation system by developing a comprehensive multimodal system that expands mobility options for all transportation users. 19 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

20 Goal: Safety Provide a safer transportation system that balances the travel needs of all users, including the general public and area businesses and industries. 20 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

21 Goal: Land Use Create a built environment that promotes healthy, sustainable communities through coordinated land use and transportation policies. 21 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Metra Station in Downtown Arlington Heights Source: Village of Arlington Heights Village Green and Train Station Source: Village of Arlington Heights and Calder Latour

22 Goal: Environmental Stewardship Promote a sustainable future through a transportation system that protects, enhances and provides connections to natural, cultural, and historic resources. 22 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

23 Goal: Implementation Advance a plan that preserves, maintains, and strategically operates existing transportation assets while investing in the expansion and diversification of critical transportation services and infrastructure. 23 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS

24 24 Overview of Investment Scenarios Running on Empty Stuck in First Gear Picking up Steam All Aboard Investment Scenarios $$$ $$$ $

25 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 25

26 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 26 Running on Empty Transportation: Preservation of existing infrastructure and services Funding/Spending: No new funding – transportation spending is very low Land Use/Development: Weak infill /reuse policies, no link between transportation spending and policy environment Implications: Current funding struggles to maintain the existing assets, and growth occurs at the urban fringe Economic Impacts: Economic vitality in the County stagnates or declines, moving elsewhere in the region

27 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 27 Stuck in First Gear Transportation: Small number of strategic projects targeted to economic development priorities Funding/Spending: Minor new revenue secured from existing sources Land Use/Development: Greater intergovernmental cooperation; more compact, mixed use, infill development Implications: Only enough new investment for highest priority areas Economic Impacts: County continues to lose market share in key industries

28 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 28 Picking Up Steam Transportation: Some new multi-jurisdictional projects Funding/Spending: More revenue from existing sources is directed to transportation projects Land Use/Development: Poor link between land use and transportation policies Implications: New investment focuses on a more diverse transportation improvements that leverage governmental resources at all levels Economic Impacts: County’s economy and communities improve but at a lower rate than expected

29 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 29 All Aboard Transportation: Aggressive modernization and system expansion across all forms of transportation Funding/Spending: Significant new federal, state and local tax revenues are enacted Land Use/Development: Support for infill development and transit/cargo oriented development Implications: Freight and public transportation networks vastly improved Economic Impacts: County is competitive nationally and in the region

30 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 30 Economic Impacts: We Need to Take Action Personal Income: Personal Income: $1 billion in capital spending on public transportation produces $1.1 billion in worker income; $1 billion in operations spending produces $1.8 billion in worker income. Property Value: Property Value: Studies over two decades show average housing value premiums associated with being within a half mile of a station are 6.4% in Philadelphia, 6.7% in Boston, 10.6% in Portland, 17% in San Diego, 20% in Chicago. Business Productivity: Business Productivity: Every $1 invested in public transportation returns up to $3 in business sales.

31 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS 31 Overview of Scenarios

32 Phase 2 Public / Stakeholder Outreach www.connectingcookcounty.org MetroQuest 32 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND HIGHWAYS Website

33 Phase 2 – Month 1 Chicago State University (District 4) Blue Island Library (District 5) Humboldt Park (District 8) Welles Park (District 10) Chicago Public Library-Garfield Ridge (District 11) Streamwood Park District (District 15) MetroQuest – Kiosk Locations 33

34 María Choca Urban LRTP Director Department of Transportation and Highways Email: maria.chocaurban@cookcountyil.govmaria.chocaurban@cookcountyil.gov Phone: 312-603-1652 34 Honorable Toni Preckwinkle, President Cook County Board of Commissioners John Yonan, P.E., Superintendent Dept. of Transportation and Highways


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