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Kaupapa Māori research reflexivity: He Ua Kōwhai Jessica Hutchings, Alex Barnes, Katrina Taupo, Nicola Bright Te Wāhanga, NZCER NZARE: Innovate Research.

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Presentation on theme: "Kaupapa Māori research reflexivity: He Ua Kōwhai Jessica Hutchings, Alex Barnes, Katrina Taupo, Nicola Bright Te Wāhanga, NZCER NZARE: Innovate Research."— Presentation transcript:

1 Kaupapa Māori research reflexivity: He Ua Kōwhai Jessica Hutchings, Alex Barnes, Katrina Taupo, Nicola Bright Te Wāhanga, NZCER NZARE: Innovate Research Design

2 Ngā Raupapa Kōrero No hea tēnei rautaki – where did He Ua Kōwhai come from? He aha ai - why kaupapa Māori reflexivity? Ngā wāhanga o He Ua Kōwhai – the elements of the model Hei whakakapi – closing remarks and reflections

3 Nō Hea Tēnei Rautaki? “Kia Puāwaitia Ngā Tūmanako – Critical Issues for Whānau in Māori Education” (2012) Identify critical issues for whānau in kōhanga, wharekura, early childhood education and Pākehā schooling sectors; from this Develop a Māori-led and whānau-informed research agenda in Māori education

4 Nō Hea Tēnei Rautaki? Recent experience, challenges and learnings as Kairangahau on Kia Puāwaitia Ngā Tūmanako Whanaungatanga and kōrero ā-whānau Primary for us as Kairangahau is safety and navigating and surviving the politics of kaupapa Māori research. Our experience gave rise to building a Kaupapa Māori conceptual framework that guides our future thinking around rangahau and kaupapa Māori – He Ua Kōwhai

5 Nō Hea Tēnei Rautaki? “He Ua Kōwhai” A whakataukī that describes the kōwhai blossom and signals the appearance of the tūī, and the availability of food sources We liken the life-cycle of the kōwhai tree, to the process of conceptualising, undertaking and sharing our kaupapa Māori research projects Whakataukī or whakatauākī have long been used by Māori to explain human experiences and their connections to Te Ao Turoa

6 He Aha Ai? During our kaupapa Māori research we reflected on the potential power and complexity in undertaking kaupapa Māori approaches in creating mātauranga Innovative research design: How do/can kairangahau find real- time ways of adapting their thinking and methods in relation to: the diverse Māori communities they are working with; and the organisations they work for?

7 He Aha Ai? As kairangahau we need to create space for critical dialogue about: The thinking and practices needed in order for kaupapa Māori research aspirations to be realised ‘ngā kaupapa tuku iho’ and how these can shape Māori educational research theory and practice in the 21st Century. the best possible ways of sharing these approaches: with whom, how, and what the purpose is.

8 Ngā Wāhanga o He Ua Kōwhai

9 He Ua Kōwhai – Te Kākano Conceiving ideas that have their roots and methods in papatūānuku and kaupapa tuku iho: whanaungatanga, ngā moemoeā, rangatiratanga, te reo rangatira, whakapapa, kaitiakitanga…. Ētahi Pātai: In what ways is are our ideas grounded and in tune with diverse whānau realities? How do we share power with different Māori communities, and not impose external agendas onto them through our engagement and analysis of the research? The seed is germinating in the earth. To do this it must be in good soil, and if the light and water conditions are right, the seed will start growing.

10 He Ua Kōwhai – Te Tupu Kaupapa such as whanaungatanga can ground our research relationships through working with diverse whānau. The everyday experiences of whānau in Māori education inform our thinking and work… Ētahi Pātai: How are our research questions connected to the every-day questions and aspirations that whānau have about education? Can whānau “see themselves” in our work, and what other benefits are there for them? The kakano lies in Papatuanuku awaiting the right conditions to germinate. A concentration of energy draws the roots outwards and growth begins. A cetnral growing stem emerges and then new shoots, eventually brancing outwards, flowering and dropping kakano awaiting the next cycle of growth.

11 He Ua Kōwhai – Te Puāwaitanga Find the best ways to share our rangahau with the communities we have relationships with, and those concerned with Māori educational issues – whānau, hapū, iwi, community leaders, educational researchers, policy makers... Ētahi Pātai: In what way are kaupapa expressed in our rangahau? How can people understand, reflect and act on the work being produced? Kōwhai flowers grow and pollen is shared. Animals, wind and rain carry the pollen.

12 He Ua Kōwhai – Te Haumako Bring together what have we learnt from Te Kākano, Te Tupu, Te Puāwaitanga and conceptualise in what ways this learning can inform our future rangahau... Ētahi Pātai: What new areas of rangahau have emerged/or need to be re-examined, and what kaupapa tell us this? How do we determine the best way to embark on new or existing areas? Kōwhai flowers drop, seed pods develop on the tree, dry out and split open. The seeds then drop to land, or are eaten by birds. This spreads the kōwhai seed and begins the life- cycle once again

13 Hei Whakakapi We are interested in creating discussion about our evolving practices of ‘kaupapa Māori’ research How do/can kaupapa Māori researchers find real-time ways of adapting their thinking and methods in relation to: – the diverse Māori communities they are working with; and – the organisations they work for

14 Ngā mihi ki a koutou See our website for updates on this research project: Contact Te Wāhanga, Manager:


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