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Artfully Educating Lessons for Capable Learning Matt Sincevich Cindy Collar Emily McClain Ashley Lane Tracy Augustyn In partial completion towards A Masters.

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Presentation on theme: "Artfully Educating Lessons for Capable Learning Matt Sincevich Cindy Collar Emily McClain Ashley Lane Tracy Augustyn In partial completion towards A Masters."— Presentation transcript:

1 Artfully Educating Lessons for Capable Learning Matt Sincevich Cindy Collar Emily McClain Ashley Lane Tracy Augustyn In partial completion towards A Masters Degree in Curriculum and Instruction, Creative Arts in Learning, Lesley University Graduate School of Education

2 Abstract a brief summary of the project telling the reader how you intend to utilize the project ( words) – The word Abstract is written and centered at the top of this page. This page will have no page number at the bottom. Topic sentence Purpose and scope of paper Major sources used - such as an existing curriculum Possible applications

3 Section 1………….Rationale……………… Section 2…………..Introduction………………...6 Section 3………….Lesson Plans………….….7-24 Artistic Language……….8-10 Drama……………………11-14 Creative Movement…… Music…………………… Visual Arts……………… Section 4…………..Instructional Aides…… Section 5…………..Visuals & Videos……… Section 6…………..Bibliography…………… Section 7…………..Acknowledgements…… Table of Contents

4 We have a responsibility to meet the needs of the whole child: body, brain, soul. We strongly believe teaching through the arts meets these needs. We envision this guide to be implemented by educators at all grade levels, by those who teach in all disciplines. Our approach/mode/model is applicable at all grade levels and for all disciplines. Rationale for the Arts in Education

5 II. Research/Resources: a) Brain-based: Jensen, Worksheets Don't Grow Dendrites by Macia L.Tate, Smart Moves, Brain Dance, Brain Gym (neuroscience) b) Multi-Intelligence: Gardner, Merryl Goldberg, Bloom's Taxonomy c) Multi-Cultural/Cultural Based Learning: Dissanyake (anthropologist) d) Character Education: tolerance, empathy, behavior, independent/critical thinking, problem solving, collaborative learning, social justice e) Arts- Based: Charles Fowler, basic human needs "Arts integration targets standards but uniquely develops cognitive abilities, social skills, and emotional dispositions that are assumed, but not always written into academic standards." (Cornett, p.67) "The rule of thumb for the arts is to emphasize arts thinking and doing over end products. However, performances and displays are important features that show the results of problem solving....The bottom line is the thinking that goes into the work is what is more important." (Cornett, p. 80) From Cornett (p ) Why Should Teachers Integrate Art? Art is a primary vehicle for symbolic communication. Art involves sensory rich thinking. Art activates emotions and motivates. Art develops an aesthetic frame of reference. Art develops higher-order thinking. Art strengthens self-concept and confidence about being unique. Art promotes respect for diversity. Art develops focus, concentration, responsibility, and self-discipline. Art naturally integrates curricular areas. Art is a way to assess.

6 Introduction This can be a narrative telling the reader why the project has personal importance for you and what in your experience led you to this topic. It is a rationale for why you created the project. References from your readings should be interwoven in this section giving you the opportunity to contribute your ideas with those of authorities in the field.

7 Lesson Plans Arranged by Modalities Artistic Language Drama Creative Movement Music Visual Arts

8 Artistic Language Lessons

9 Rationale For Artistic Language

10 Major Art Modality Utilized: Visual Art, Artistic Language Level of Engagement: Applying and Creation Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Addressed: Visual, Linguistic [Emily include visual arts standards to the left] Lesson Abstract: Using their study of The Odyssey, students create a graphic novel to illustrate major plot points. The pictures serve as notes and references for the assignment. Materials Needed: Text of The Odyssey, copy paper, two pieces of construction paper per student, one chopstick (bamboo skewer or straw may be substituted), one rubber band per student. Assorted colored pencils or crayons. Procedures:. Students will participate in reading The Odyssey aloud with teacher-guided questions. At the end of each book, have students summarize the major plot points. [Provide teacher guided questions] List the major plot points on the board for the class to see. Indicate the characters involved, the setting, and a general description of the conflict. 2. The students sketch a series of comic panels illustrating the plot points. Encourage students to include details that will help them remember the story and characters. The goal is to create a functional visual representation of the events, not a perfect illustration of the story. Students should include identifying labels, dialogue, or captions. 3. While students read, encourage them to list words they don’t know or pose questions they have about the reading on the reverse side of the comic panels. The comic books become a reference for discussion and a storage place for notes. 4. Once the class has completed their reading of The Odyssey, students bind their pages together, in order, creating a complete comic book of the story. The students may use the comic book for pre-writing, and/or as a study tool. For written instructions on how to assemble the book, see teacher notes located on left. [Insert images of book making process here!]*Possible modification: students bring 2-3 magazines to share with the class to use to create collages for comic book. Assessment: The students’ comic books indicate understanding of the plot of The Odyssey. Resources/ Links: Sources for lesson, additional websites, rubrics, etc. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS Summarize and paraphrase literary and informational text (SAT I, ACT) (LA09_B ) Expand vocabulary through reading in all content areas, etymology, and the use of dictionaries and other references (GPS, HSGT) (LA09_C ) Read for a variety of purposes in all content areas; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions, or to stimulate ideas (GPS, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B2005-9) Area for Teacher Notes: Chopstick Book: To create the binding for the finished graphic novel, align all the pages and punch 2 holes roughly 3 to 4 inches apart. Center the computer paper on the construction paper, creating a front cover and a back cover. Punch holes through the construction paper as well. Thread one end of the rubber band through one hole, stick the chopstick through the loop. Stretch the rubber band to the other hole; thread the other end of the chopstick through the loop. The finished book should be bound together and the cover can be decorated. See images to the right. [Possibility of creating pages for these types of projects…generalized]: Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS Summarize and paraphrase literary and informational text (SAT I, ACT) (LA09_B ) Expand vocabulary through reading in all content areas, etymology, and the use of dictionaries and other references (GPS, HSGT) (LA09_C ) Read for a variety of purposes in all content areas; expect reading to make sense, to answer questions, or to stimulate ideas (GPS, HSGT, SAT I, ACT, CE) (LA09_B2005-9) Area for Teacher Notes: Chopstick Book: To create the binding for the finished graphic novel, align all the pages and punch 2 holes roughly 3 to 4 inches apart. Center the computer paper on the construction paper, creating a front cover and a back cover. Punch holes through the construction paper as well. Thread one end of the rubber band through one hole, stick the chopstick through the loop. Stretch the rubber band to the other hole; thread the other end of the chopstick through the loop. The finished book should be bound together and the cover can be decorated. See images to the right. [Possibility of creating pages for these types of projects…generalized]: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Artistic Language (An Odyssey Comic Adventure)- 9th Grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Artistic Language (An Odyssey Comic Adventure)- 9th Grade

11 Drama Lessons

12 Rationale For Drama

13 Major Art Modality Utilized: Drama Level of Engagement: Applying, analyzing, evaluating, creating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Linguistic, Visual, Interpersonal Lesson Abstract: Each student will participate in an in-depth study of one of the elements of the Periodic Table, developing a Chemical Personality that they will portray in a group performance. Materials Needed: Large poster of the Periodic Table, research materials about different elements, copies about Creating a Chemical Personality and Chemical Romance Debriefing handouts. (one per student) Procedures. Allow each student to choose a different element from a standard list. Explain that they should try to keep their chosen element a secret from the other members of the class (as much as this is possible). They will be using the characteristics of this element to create a real "character" that they will act as for a Quiz/Dating Game Show that will be held in class later in the week. Students should use the class time to research their chosen element and complete the Creating a Chemical Personality handout. Encourage students to complete/add to the handout for homework. During the next class, collect completed handouts and check for information accuracy. Pass back to the students for corrections or additions. Students need to plan out a costume for their character that will correspond with some facts about their chosen element (for example, a student playing Copper might create a hat decorated with pennies or copper wire, or a student playing Radium might create a vest with a Hazardous Materials warning label on it, etc). On a pre-determined day students should arrive in class wearing their Element costumes and be prepared to "be" their element throughout the duration of the class. Explain to the students that they will be allowed five to ten minutes to "mingle" in a party- style atmosphere, asking each other questions to try to figure out each person's element. Remind students not to directly state their element but give clues that might help others figure out who they are playing. SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Chemistry / Drama-10 th Grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Chemistry / Drama-10 th Grade Page 1 of 2 Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  Use the organization of the periodic table of elements to predict the properties of elements (GPS, HSGT) (SCCH_B )  Analyze the arrangement of the periodic table (GPS, HSGT) (SCPS_F ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  Use the organization of the periodic table of elements to predict the properties of elements (GPS, HSGT) (SCCH_B )  Analyze the arrangement of the periodic table (GPS, HSGT) (SCPS_F )

14 Procedures (continued) After the mingling time period is over, choose fve students to play an improvisation game called "The Dating Game." (For a longer description of this game, please see the resource/links section of the lesson plan). Allow the students the opportunity to try to "pair off" with another element to create a common chemical compound (for example, Sodium and Chlorine would come together to form salt). The questions that are asked during the Dating Game may be pre-written by the teacher or created by the students. For homework or for an additional class period time students can complete the Chemical Romance Debriefing assignment. Assessment: Teachers may assess student learning during the mingling and Dating Game portion of the class performance by listening to the answers the students provide their peers. Also the debriefing assignment serves as an assessment of learning the teacher may choose to grade as a quiz or test. Resources/ Links: Handouts: Creating a Chemical Personality /Users/admin/Desktop/Creating a Chemical Character.odt /Users/admin/Desktop/Creating a Chemical Character.odt Chemical Romance Debriefing /Users/admin/Desktop/Chemical Romance Debriefng.odt/Users/admin/Desktop/Chemical Romance Debriefng.odt Links: Improvisation Games- Element Research- Area for Teacher Notes:  This lesson can span several days while other assignments, lectures, or labs are being conducted. The majority of the research and "chemical character" development can be done at home.  It might be a nice addition to film the "mingling party" portion of the class so that you have an opportunity to go back and see additional moments that you might have missed while watching the first time. Area for Teacher Notes:  This lesson can span several days while other assignments, lectures, or labs are being conducted. The majority of the research and "chemical character" development can be done at home.  It might be a nice addition to film the "mingling party" portion of the class so that you have an opportunity to go back and see additional moments that you might have missed while watching the first time. Page 2 of 2 SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Chemistry / Drama-10 th Grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Chemistry / Drama-10 th Grade

15 Creative Movement Lessons

16 Rationale For Creative Movement

17 Major Art Modality Utilized: Creative Movement Level of Engagement: Multiple Intelligences Addressed: visual, kinesthetic, intrapersonal Lesson Abstract: Nature Speaks: finding movement in the work of Charles Burchfield. Students will work together in small groups to perform a dance. The dance will be a sequence of creative movements; which reflect upon and communicate ideas, feelings, and thoughts based on the painting December Storm by Charles Burchfield Materials Needed: Procedures Session 1: students enter the classroom, form a circle as a group, and I explain that we are going to be using our bodies this week to create some performance art. warm up: Level 1: Introduction of the Brain Dance [Ann Green Gilbert: Brain Dance]Ann Green Gilbert: Brain Dance Level 2: After brain dance we "passed the energy" I started with an imaginary ball of energy, emphasize the need to watch the person next to you so you can anticipate how they pass this energy to you... each person in the circle is to change the ball of energy... (ie. stretch it, blow it up like a bubble, step inside the bubble, make it heavy, make it big, make it sticky, slippery, hot...etc.) This is an activity that is nonverbal. Stressing no words...only actions. Next, have painting/artwork on display (poster, overhead...but big enough for students to see at the same time.) Encourage to image they were in an Art Gallery, view the work of art, examine the painting, look at the details. Students are asked to ponder the question: what do you see? Class gathers back together in a circle to brainstorm a list as a class of ideas...images, feelings, thoughts, and actions. I write the list big enough for the class to see. When the class has a list of 8-10 ideas/concepts/themes, I ask the students to think about the 1st idea on the list. “What would that look like?” [I state to the class that we must respect each others personal space in the circle] I encourage the students to make a movement and repeat it a few times. I watch the group and choose a movement, which all students are able to make. After choosing the action for *item 1*. I perform the movement and ask the class to join. We continue through the list performing a sequence of movements based on our list of ideas. We go over the whole sequence without music, then I say "now let's try it with music." I praise the group for working together, mentioning principle of design: unity. We begin to discuss the idea of variation. I explain some elements of dance: including using a variety of levels (low on the floor, bending or leaning, stretching, jumping), changing directions, using different speeds of movement to convey a message or feeling. I ask for students to help demonstrate the different relationships between dancers. I ask students to be aware of balance, symmetry Closing: I explain to the students, they will work in small groups for session creating their own sequence of movements using the ideas from our list and changing them to fit the needs of their group. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  Shape information to achieve a particular purpose and to appeal to the interests and background knowledge of audience members (5LA_A ) Restate main ideas and details, inferring, summarizing, making generalizations, questioning, and respectfully offering opinions (5LA_A2009-1) Draw conclusions and make generalizations (5SS_B ) Present information through demonstrations and projects (5LA-J ) Produce designs that use selected subject matter, including symbols and ideas, to communicate a message (5VA_A2005-9) Create unity in a work of art (5VA_A2005-4) Create works of art that imitate nature, express feelings or emotions, and are concerned with design and composition (5VA_A ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  Shape information to achieve a particular purpose and to appeal to the interests and background knowledge of audience members (5LA_A ) Restate main ideas and details, inferring, summarizing, making generalizations, questioning, and respectfully offering opinions (5LA_A2009-1) Draw conclusions and make generalizations (5SS_B ) Present information through demonstrations and projects (5LA-J ) Produce designs that use selected subject matter, including symbols and ideas, to communicate a message (5VA_A2005-9) Create unity in a work of art (5VA_A2005-4) Create works of art that imitate nature, express feelings or emotions, and are concerned with design and composition (5VA_A ) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Painting Nature-Visual Art-5 th Grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Painting Nature-Visual Art-5 th Grade

18 Procedures (continued) Session 2 Level 1: Warm up: Brain Dance Students count off by 4 to form groups. Once students are seated with their newly formed groups, we view a video of a professional performance. I stop the video periodically to ask questions: What did you notice so far? What’s happening? Level 3: After watching the video students receive an elements of dance handout to use with their group. As a class we review some of the ideas discussed at the end of session 1. They are expected to work together. They should consider and value ideas and thoughts from each member of the group. Everyone in the group participates. I stress that no one is going to become a object for the duration of the performance (“for example: no one will just stand in the background and be a tree the whole time”) I encourage them to sketch out their ideas, and try them. They are encouraged to move, use the space they have. Try and change, “how can we make this better?”, “what could we do to make this more interesting?” As the groups work, I walk around and ask the students to show me what they’ve created so far….I offer tips or suggestions. Reminding them they are communicating the ideas the artist has painted. Session 3: Check in at the beginning of class: Group meeting. Discuss: What is working? What isn’t working? Reminding students to share ideas and listen to each other. Students continue to work in their groups. I observe and offer suggestions. Reminding students to reference their sheet for ideas. Closing: We will record each group’s performance tomorrow. Discuss with your group: costume? Will you all wear something to bring unity to the group? Session 4: Last rehearsal for the first 10 minutes of class. Before performing discuss expectations for the audience. [No talking during other performances, watch carefully, show respect….etc.] Record performances (if possible). Closing: Session 5 will be a critique. We will watch all performances and critique them, including our own. Session 5: If time allows Session 5 is a formal critique of all performances. Students evaluate their work and their peers. Students reflect on the learning experiences. Written reflection using vocabulary and terms discussed throughout the lesson is encouraged. Assessment: Students evaluate their work and their peers. Students reflect on the learning experiences. Evidence of vocabulary usage and terms discussed will be evaluated in the students’ written reflections. Resources/ Links: Teaching the three R’s through movement experiences: A handbook for teachers Anne Green Gilbert, handout, see attached Recognize how artists use selected subject matter, including symbols and ideas to communicate a message (5VA_B ) Select elements or combinations of elements to express variation in 2-D and 3- D compositions (5VA_B ) Interpret, describe, analyze, and judge works of art based on specified criteria (5VA_C ) Area for Teacher Notes: Recognize how artists use selected subject matter, including symbols and ideas to communicate a message (5VA_B ) Select elements or combinations of elements to express variation in 2-D and 3- D compositions (5VA_B ) Interpret, describe, analyze, and judge works of art based on specified criteria (5VA_C ) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL:

19 Music Lessons

20 Rationale For Music Music and Literacy: “The rationale stems from four ways to approach conditions for learning transfer that may exist between music and language: (1) music and written language employ highly differentiated symbol systems yet both involve analogous decoding and comprehension reading processes (such as reading from left to right, sequential ordering of content, etc.), (2) there are also interesting parallels in underlying concepts shared between music and language reading skills, (3) music reading involves the simultaneous incorporation (and reading) of written text with music, and (4) learning in the context of a highly motivated social context such as music ensembles may lead to ‘heightened academic responsibility and performance’ that may enhance reading achievement” (Butzlaff, 2000).

21 Rationale For Music Music and Math: “Through music, students can improve their spatial reasoning, counting, problem solving, graphing, and use and understanding of ratios” (Page, 1995, p. 31).

22 Major Art Modality Utilized: Music Level of Engagement: Understanding, applying, analyzing, creating Multiple Intelligences Addressed : Musical, Intrapersonal, Interpersonal Lesson Abstract: To be a culturally literate person, one must be aware of situations and people who, in some way, have had an impact on culture. Students will embark on their own journey by researching historical events. Students will demonstrate this understanding through the production of an original song. Materials Needed: Selected songs provided by teacher, grading rubrics, Internet access, copies of the lyrics. Procedures: Introduce unit, review guidelines (see attached file) Review and discuss lyrics of selected songs (see attached list). Research and record historical relevance of song and/or performer. Students will work in pairs and choose a song. Research the song to investigate the historical time period in which the song was written or written about. Students compose their original song. Present song to the class. Assessment: See grading components and performance task grading criteria attached on the next page. Resources/ Links: See list of suggested songs attached on the next page. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS participate in student-to-student, teacher-to-student, and group verbal interactions (GPS) (7LA_A2009-1) listen to and view various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas (GPS) (7LA_A2009-2) use context clues to identify unknown words (GPS) (7LA_B2009-3) read with a rhythm, flow, and meter that sounds like everyday speech (prosody) (GPS) (7LA_B2009-9) recognize and trace the development of the author's argument for and against an issue (GPS) (7LA_D ) examine the author's purpose in writing (GPS) (7LA_E ) explore life experiences related to subject-area content (GPS) (7LA_E ) write to establish an appropriate organizational structure, set a context and engage the reader, maintain a coherent focus throughout, and provide a satisfying closure (GPS) (7LA_G ) produce expository writing (e.g., description, explanation, comparison and contrast, or problem and solution) that establishes a context, creates a speaker's voice, and otherwise develops reader's interest (GPS) (7LA_G ) include researched information in different types of products (e.g., compositions, multimedia presentations, graphic organizers, projects, etc.) (GPS) (7LA_G ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS participate in student-to-student, teacher-to-student, and group verbal interactions (GPS) (7LA_A2009-1) listen to and view various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas (GPS) (7LA_A2009-2) use context clues to identify unknown words (GPS) (7LA_B2009-3) read with a rhythm, flow, and meter that sounds like everyday speech (prosody) (GPS) (7LA_B2009-9) recognize and trace the development of the author's argument for and against an issue (GPS) (7LA_D ) examine the author's purpose in writing (GPS) (7LA_E ) explore life experiences related to subject-area content (GPS) (7LA_E ) write to establish an appropriate organizational structure, set a context and engage the reader, maintain a coherent focus throughout, and provide a satisfying closure (GPS) (7LA_G ) produce expository writing (e.g., description, explanation, comparison and contrast, or problem and solution) that establishes a context, creates a speaker's voice, and otherwise develops reader's interest (GPS) (7LA_G ) include researched information in different types of products (e.g., compositions, multimedia presentations, graphic organizers, projects, etc.) (GPS) (7LA_G ) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Language Arts or Music / 7th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Language Arts or Music / 7th grade

23 Assessment: Student research and record: facts about the selected song and/or performer. Student research and record: facts about the selected time period. Final product: Student-written song about the chosen time period in either a slide show or video. The performance must include a single event or time period as documented in the research notes. Selected Songs: Back in the USSR by Beatles We Didn’t Start the Fire by Billy Joel In the Ghetto by Elvis Abraham, Martin, John by Dion For What It’s Worth by Buffalo Springfield American Pie by Don Maclean Night They Drove Old Dixie Down by The Band Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot That’s Just the Way it Is by Bruce Hornsby We Are the World by USA for Africa Born in the USA by Bruce Springsteen Everybody Wants to Rule the World by Tears for Fears End of the World by REM Sunday, Bloody Sunday by U2 Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning by Alan Jackson The Night Chicago Died by Paperlace Fortunate Son by Creedence Clearwater Revival Buffalo Soldier by Bob Marley Viva la Vida by Coldplay Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  GPS/State Standards Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  GPS/State Standards Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL:

24 Major Art Modality Utilized: Music and Artistic Language Level of Engagement: Understanding, Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Musical Lesson Abstract: Students will learn both the American national anthem and the Canadian national anthem. Then, students will compare and contrast the two countries based on the lyrics of the anthems. Once students are familiar with the two countries, they will be able to take the facts from the lesson to put to a familiar tune. Materials Needed: Lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” lyrics of “O Canada” on a handout, music recordings of both songs, Venn diagram handout. Procedures: * Prior to this project, students have been learning about America and Canada for two weeks. From an electronic source, show the lyrics of “O Canada” and “The Star Spangled Banner” while playing the anthems. Discuss and analyze conclusions and generalizations that can be drawn about Canada and the United States from the lyrics. On a Venn diagram, compare and contrast the two national anthems of both countries. * 1. Have students brainstorm what it means to be a United States citizen. Generate a list of facts and vocabulary words. 2. Guide a discussion about patriotism and having pride for ones’ country. Also define national anthems and what they reveal about a county. 3. In small groups, utilizing the melody of a familiar tune, students will create their own lyrics expressing what they believe it means to be a loyal citizen. Allow at least a day or two to let students finish. Assessment: The students will demonstrate their knowledge by presenting their anthems/songs to the class. Standards Addressed in this Lesson: explain the structure of the national government of Canada (GPS) (6SS_D ) analyze important contemporary issues in Canada (GPS) (6SS_D ) compare similarities and differences (GPS) (6SS_B ) identify issues and/or problems and alternative solutions (GPS) (6SS_B ) draw conclusions and make generalizations (GPS) (6SS_B ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: explain the structure of the national government of Canada (GPS) (6SS_D ) analyze important contemporary issues in Canada (GPS) (6SS_D ) compare similarities and differences (GPS) (6SS_B ) identify issues and/or problems and alternative solutions (GPS) (6SS_B ) draw conclusions and make generalizations (GPS) (6SS_B ) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Social Studies / 6 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Social Studies / 6 th grade

25 Major Art Modality Utilized: Music Level of Engagement: Understanding, Analyzing, Evaluating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Auditory Lesson Abstract: Music that is part of local culture tells us about important ideas and values shared by the people making and hearing the music. By means of an interview of a family member, students will gain knowledge of their personal ethnic background and the music/instruments associated with their particular culture. Materials Needed: List of suggested questions to ask during the interview, Internet access Procedures: 1.Students will select a close family member to interview. Allow enough time for relatives to recollect memories and artifacts (i.e. one week). Interview questions can include: a)Describe your culture; talk about what you know of your culture, your beliefs and religion(s), customs of your culture (i.e. celebrations, holidays, sports), and the arts of your culture. b)Talk about your earliest memories of song as a child, songs you do and do not enjoy, and songs that are attached to certain events in your life. c)Talk about the music of your culture and whether or not it played a major role in your life. 2.Students will present their information to the class (see attached rubric) 3.Once the students have identified their own personal heritage, they are encouraged to find others in the class who have a similar cultural background. 4.Groups then go to the computer lab at the school to conduct research on the music of their culture. Internet access is recommended, as well as books pulled from the library shelves for further research. Research must include: 1.Instruments unique to a particular region 2.Styles of music within the culture 3.History behind the music 4.Any costumes or special artifacts that are unique to a certain culture Standards Addressed in this Lesson: listen and distinguish among music of various cultures (QCC, CE) (7GM_A2005-3) associate names of orchestra, folk, and ethnic instruments with their sounds and pictures (QCC) (7GM_A2005-9) explore similarities and differences of different categories of music (historical, ethnic, popular, and folk) (QCC) (7GM_D ) recognize the use of music in recreation and other activities (QCC) (8GM_E ) explore community musical organization and concert attendance opportunities (QCC, CE) (8GM_E ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: listen and distinguish among music of various cultures (QCC, CE) (7GM_A2005-3) associate names of orchestra, folk, and ethnic instruments with their sounds and pictures (QCC) (7GM_A2005-9) explore similarities and differences of different categories of music (historical, ethnic, popular, and folk) (QCC) (7GM_D ) recognize the use of music in recreation and other activities (QCC) (8GM_E ) explore community musical organization and concert attendance opportunities (QCC, CE) (8GM_E ) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Music or Social Studies / Upper grades SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Music or Social Studies / Upper grades

26 Major Art Modality Utilized: Music Level of Engagement: Understanding, Analyzing, Evaluating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Auditory Assessment: Students will present the findings from their interviews in class. Presentations can include (but are not limited to) a picture collage, demonstration of how to play certain instruments, a recording of a song, or a demonstration of a dance. Students are also allowed to dress in articles of clothing that are associated with the culture. Resources/ Links: Kids Field Guide to Local Culture (Madison Children’s Museum, 2004) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: listen and distinguish among music of various cultures (QCC, CE) (7GM_A2005-3) associate names of orchestra, folk, and ethnic instruments with their sounds and pictures (QCC) (7GM_A2005-9) explore similarities and differences of different categories of music (historical, ethnic, popular, and folk) (QCC) (7GM_D ) recognize the use of music in recreation and other activities (QCC) (8GM_E ) explore community musical organization and concert attendance opportunities (QCC, CE) (8GM_E ) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: listen and distinguish among music of various cultures (QCC, CE) (7GM_A2005-3) associate names of orchestra, folk, and ethnic instruments with their sounds and pictures (QCC) (7GM_A2005-9) explore similarities and differences of different categories of music (historical, ethnic, popular, and folk) (QCC) (7GM_D ) recognize the use of music in recreation and other activities (QCC) (8GM_E ) explore community musical organization and concert attendance opportunities (QCC, CE) (8GM_E ) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Music or Social Studies / 7 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Music or Social Studies / 7 th grade

27 Major Art Modality Utilized: Music Level of Engagement: Understanding, applying, analyzing Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Auditory Lesson Abstract: Sound is conveyed most quickly through a solid rather than a liquid or a gas due to the molecules being so close together. With this music project, students can use a solid (metal) to hear quiet vibrations of sound in creating a “silent gong.” Materials Needed: one (1) wire clothes hanger for each student in the class, yards of string, scissors, pencils, pens. Procedures: 1.Discuss the vibrations of sound and the transfer of sound through a solid, liquid, and gas. 2.Demonstrate to the class how sound is conveyed most quickly through a solid rather than a gas by means of a wire clothes hanger. 3.Taking a wire coat hanger in hand, take a piece of string and tie an end of the string to a corner of the clothes hanger. 4.With a second piece of string, tie to the opposing end of the clothes hanger. 5. Wrap one string around an index finger and wrap the second string around the other finger. 6. With both fingers wrapped with string, instruct the students to plug their ears with their wrapped fingers. Another student will then take an object (i.e. pencil, pen) and strike the wire clothes hanger, causing it to vibrate and the student holding the strings to hear a “gong” in their ears. Assessment: Students will be able to recognize the low vibrations if they can hear an audible “gong” sound in their ears. Resources/ Links: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter. c. Describe the movement of particles in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas states. MMSMA.4 - Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments b. Create musical ideas from a variety of available sound sources Standards Addressed in this Lesson: S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter. c. Describe the movement of particles in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas states. MMSMA.4 - Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments b. Create musical ideas from a variety of available sound sources SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade

28 Visual Arts Lessons

29 Rationale For Visual Arts

30 Major Art Modality Utilized:Art and Music Level of Engagement: Applying and Evaluating, Analyzing Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Musical, Kinesthetic, Visual Lesson Abstract: Students will learn short songs to help them learn the different denominations of coins in United States currency. They will create Money Mats and utilize these in group formats to practice choosing the correct amount of coins to purchase items. Materials Needed: Pictures of household items from catalogs, scissors, glue, 11" x 17" colored construction paper, price tag print-outs (see attached) Procedures (During math time over several days) 1. During calendar or circle time, pass around several copper pennies to the students to hold. Ask them what it is. Most will be able to identify it as "money" and a few may identify it as a "penny." Teach the students "The Penny Song" (to the tune of "Found a Peanut"- See references). Sing through the song several times together. 2. Count out fve pennies and hold them out in one hand. In the other hand hold a nickel. Explain that it takes fve pennies to make one nickel. Pass around the nickels and ask the students what they notice that is different about the nickel compared to the penny. Teach the students "The Nickel Song" (Same tune but different words to "The Penny Song"- See references). Sing through the Nickel Song a few times, then refresh the students on The Penny Song. Ask a few students to trade you a nickel by having them choose the correct number of pennies. 3. Count out two nickels and hold them out in one hand. In the other hand hold a dime. Explain that it takes two nickels to make one dime. Pass around the dimes. 4. Go through the same process as before with a quarter. Teach the students the quarter song. (See references) Review all four songs. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS AKS identify coins by name and value: pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollar bills (GPS) (KMA_B ) AKS count out pennies to buy items that together cost less than 30 cents (GPS) (KMA_B ) AKS make fair trades involving combinations of pennies and nickels or pennies and dimes (GPS) (KMA_B ) Area for Teacher Notes: If you plan on using the "Money Mats" over the course of several days you may want to have them laminated for extra durability. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS AKS identify coins by name and value: pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollar bills (GPS) (KMA_B ) AKS count out pennies to buy items that together cost less than 30 cents (GPS) (KMA_B ) AKS make fair trades involving combinations of pennies and nickels or pennies and dimes (GPS) (KMA_B ) Area for Teacher Notes: If you plan on using the "Money Mats" over the course of several days you may want to have them laminated for extra durability. SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Math/Kindergarten or 1st Grade 1 st page of 2

31 Procedures (continued) 5. Have a wide selection of items from catalogs spread out over several tables. Allow studetns to choose 3 items and cut out just the images from the magazine pages. Have a pair of students glue their images to a large piece of construction paper. Hand the students several of the price tags pieces already cut out and let them glue one by each item on their paper. Once these are complete refer to them as their “Money Mats”. 6. Allow the students to practice determining the correct amount of coins they will need to purchase different items on their mats. Occasionally rotate the mats around to different groups. Students should be encouraged to use a variety of different types of coins ( not just all pennies or all dimes). As a class, determine how you could purchase an item that is 25 cents without using a quarter. Repeat for additional values. Assessment: How will the learning be assessed? Test? Performance? Self-Assessment? Resources/ Links: Sources for lesson, additional websites, rubrics, etc. SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: 2 nd page of 2

32 Major Art Modality Utilized: Visual Art Level of Engagement: Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Visual Lesson Abstract: After learning about energy, students will create a project demonstrating their knowledge of the vocabulary learned during the lesson. Materials Needed: Internet/computer access, poster paper, scissors, glue, construction paper, and markers/colored pencils. Procedures: Prior to this project, students learned various forms and transformations of energy * Students, working alone or in small groups, are given ten vocabulary words to create a picture that demonstrates understanding of the provided vocabulary. Students present project to the class. Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade

33 Major Art Modality Utilized: Visual Art Level of Engagement: Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Visual Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade

34 Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade

35 Assessment: Example of Assessment of a Science Application: Name ______________________________ Per ______ Date _______ Energy Drawing Use the following vocabulary words to create one of the items above. Use creativity to show your understanding of the vocabulary words. Due: ________ Energy Kinetic energy Potential energy Fusion Fission Energy conversion (3 minimum) Newtons Joules Height Speed Mass Weight Gravitational potential energy Elastic potential energy Mechanical Energy Thermal energy Chemical energy Electrical energy Sound energy Light/radiant energy Nuclear energy Law of Conservation of Energy Use of vocabulary:22 pts_____ Understanding of vocabulary22 pts_____ Energy Conversions(3) 6 pts_____ Creativity10 pts_____ TOTAL 60 pts Attach to assignment. Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_C : Examine various forms and transformations of energy (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science/ 8 th grade

36 Major Art Modality Utilized: Visual Art Level of Engagement: Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, Creating Multiple Intelligences Addressed: Visual Lesson Abstract: After studying the Periodic Table of Elements, students will display their knowledge of the elements by creating an art project on a specific element. Materials Needed: Internet/computer access, poster paper, scissors, glue, construction paper, and markers/colored pencils. Procedures: *Prior to this project, students have been learning about the Periodic Table of Elements for two weeks * Students are randomly assigned an element for this project. Students research their element in the computer lab and complete Element Research Information sheet (see attached file). Students design their project using one the following choices: a social network poster, a ‘wanted’ poster, an advertisement, or an informational brochure. Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade

37 Assessment Example: Choose one of the following projects: PTbook: Social Network site with posts and ads (see pictures for example) Element Brochure: Informational brochure to buy the element or go to that element location. Element Story: Life story through the eyes of the element. Wanted Poster: Provide investigative information needed to identify the element. Advertisement: Try to sell your element. Persuade us to buy it! The project will include the following information: Points Element Name (English, Latin, German, etc.)5 Element Symbol5 Atomic number5 Atomic mass5 Energy Levels1 Solid, Liquid, Gas2 Metal, Nonmetal, Metalloid2 Physical Properties (5)5 Chemical Properties (2)2 Discovery (Who, Where, When)3 Where found1 Uses (compounds)(3)3 Interesting facts (4)4 Pictures (Bohr Model, other forms, as compounds) 7 ___________________ Total Points50 Resources/ Links: s.com/http://www.chemicalelement s.com/ periodictable.phphttp://www.factmonster.com/ periodictable.php elements.html elements.html les/elem_intro.html les/elem_intro.html visualelements/pages/pertabl e_fla.htm visualelements/pages/pertabl e_fla.htm Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL:

38 Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) Standards Addressed in this Lesson: 8SC_B : Investigate the arrangement of the Periodic Table (GPS) SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL: Science / 8 th grade

39 Instructional Aides

40 Bloom’s Taxonomy

41

42 Videos

43

44 Bibliography

45

46 Acknowledgements

47 Thank you everyone!!!!!

48 Major Art Modality Utilized: Level of Engagement: Multiple Intelligences Addressed:, Lesson Abstract: Materials Needed: Procedures (Listed by Day) Assessment: How will the learning be assessed? Test? Performance? Self-Assessment? Resources/ Links: Sources for lesson, additional websites, rubrics, etc. Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  GPS/State Standards Area for Teacher Notes: Standards Addressed in this Lesson:  AKS  GPS/State Standards Area for Teacher Notes: SUBJECT AREA/ SUGGESTED GRADE LEVEL:

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