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Vocabulary and Mini Lessons

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1 Vocabulary and Mini Lessons
Our Poetry Vocabulary and Mini Lessons

2 “Annabel Lee” winged – having wings seraphs – angels
(pronounced wing-ed) seraphs – angels kinsmen – relatives sepulcher – tomb (pronounced sep-ul-ker) coveted – to wish for with great envy

3 “Because I Could Not Stop for Death”
immortality – living forever haste – hurry civility – politeness tulle – (pronounced “tool”) a net-like fabric often used in wedding veils gossamer – a light-weight, delicate fabric cornice – the decorative piece that forms the top edge of a building or column and often extends beyond it surmised – decided or guessed

4 Mini Lesson # ___ by: Emily Dickinson G? What literary devices does
“Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by: Emily Dickinson G? What literary devices does the Dickinson use to enrich her writing?

5 Personification The giving of human qualities to the non-human
“Because I could not stop for Death/He kindly stopped for me . . .”

6 Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds within lines of poetry
“ For only Gossamer, my Gown/My Tippet only Tulle . . .”

7 “Big Yellow Taxi” DDT – (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
A toxic insecticide

8 “The Choice” billowing – a rolling mass like a wave smoldering – red, like a slow smoky fire lilting – in a lively, cheerful manner

9 “Crossing the Bar” moaning – a long, low sound indicating pain or grief embark – depart, leave bourne – limit, destination

10 “The Day is Done” wafted – to float lightly in the breeze or waves
akin – similar to banish – to drive or force away “bards sublime” famous, old poets (like Shakespeare) martial – suited for a warrior or war toll – costs, price paid endeavor – efforts, work devoid – without benediction – an expression of good wishes

11 “Desiderata” placidly – peacefully, calmly amid – in the middle of
haste – hurry vexations – causes of trouble or worry feign – pretend cynical – doubtful aridity – dryness disenchantment – disappointments perennial – returning year after year labors and aspirations – work and goals sham – fake drudgery – hard or dull work

12 “Dreams Lead the Heart”
vivid – bright, bold falters – moves unsteadily

13 Mini Lesson #__ “Dreams Lead the Heart” by: Margaret Sangster
G?: What literary devices does Sangster use to enrich her writing?

14 Personification The use of human qualities to portray the non-human
“ There is no dream so small but its slim fingers/May point the path to all that life holds best . . .”

15 “The Eagle” clasps – grabs (as if by claws)
crag – a steep rugged rock or cliff azure – the color of a clear blue sky

16 “Fog” haunches – rear legs

17 Mini Lesson # ___ GQ: What makes imagery imagery?
“The Eagle,” by: Alfred, Lord Tennyson “Fog,” by: Carl Sandburg “the drum,” by: Nikki Giovanni GQ: What makes imagery imagery?

18 Imagery Language that a poet or writer uses to help a reader re-create a mental “image” of a scene Uses the senses to how something looks, smells, tastes, sounds, feels

19 “The Forecast” sprawl – to spread out or lie about

20 “For My Sister Molly Who in the Fifties”
Eatonton (Georgia) Walker’s hometown

21 “Friendship” chaff- the trashy matter separated from the seed when threshing grain sift – to separate (in this case, the good from the bad)

22 “The Frost” blustering – to move in a noisy, boastful way
“in vain” – without success crest – the upper part or point boughs – branches “mail”- armor made of small metal links margin – edge or border bevies- a large group of cupboard- (pronounced “cub-bard”) kitchen cabinet “tchick” – the sound of breaking glass An example of onomatopoeia

23 Mini Lesson # __ G? What literary devices does Gould use to enrich her
“The Frost,” by Hannah Flagg Gould G? What literary devices does Gould use to enrich her writing?

24 Personification A type of figurative language in which a non-human subject is given human qualities Frost talks, looks, thinks, etc.

25 Onomatopoeia The use of words to imitate sounds
Examples: crash, buzz, hiss, jingle, cluck “tchick” creates the sound of cracking glass

26 Rhyme scheme AAAB CCCB

27 Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds
such as “bevies of birds”

28 “If” imposter – pretender knaves – persons of low-class birth
pitch-and-toss – a gamble sinew – tendons that hold muscles in place virtue – good moral conduct

29 “Incident in a Rose Garden”
scythe – (pronounced “syth”) A gardening tool with a curved blade and a long handle the Grim Reaper’s tool of choice beckoned – called or signaled as if to invite

30 Mini Lesson #__ “Incident in a Rose Garden” by: Donald Justice
G? What literary devices does Justice use to enrich his writing?

31 Personification Applying human qualities to non-human entities
“ . . .Death/ stood there [and] He would have spoken . . .”

32 Simile A comparison of 2 elements using “like” or “as”
“ . . .Death/ . . .Thin as a scythe . . .stood there . . .”

33 Irony What occurs is the opposite of what is expected to happen
The master assumes that Death would never come for him (because of his position, wealth, age, etc.)

34 “Invictus” fell – dangerous winced – to shrink back as if in pain
clutch – grasp circumstance – situation bludgeonings – beatings wrath – violent anger looms – hangs around menace – danger strait – distressed or confused

35 Mini Lesson # ___ G? What literary devices does
“Invictus” by: William Ernest Henley G? What literary devices does Henley use to enrich his writing?

36 Rhyme Scheme A rhyme pattern present at the end of poetry lines abab

37 Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds within lines of poetry
“ Black as the pit from pole to pole ” “Under the bludgeonings of chance/My head is bloody, but unbowed . . .”

38 “A Life on the Ocean” revels – a noisy celebration
rave – move about wildly brine – salty, sea water gale – a strong wind stout – strong and sturdy tempest- chaos and commotion pine – to long for something very much abaft – toward the stern or rear end of the boat

39 Mini Lesson #___ “A Life on the Ocean Wave” by: Epes Sargent
G? What literary devices does Sargent use to enrich his writing?

40 Personification “. . .The clouds have begun to frown . . .”
The use of human qualities or actions to portray the non-human “. . .The clouds have begun to frown . . .”

41 Similes A comparison using “like” or “as” “like a caged eagle”
“like an ocean-bird”

42 Rhyme scheme A pattern of end-line rhyme ABABCDCD

43 “Living” woo/court- to try to gain the love of
bliss – something that brings happiness fondle/caress – to touch or handle in tender or loving way advent – the first appearance or arrival hail – greet attain – achieve, get

44 “Love” tavern – a drinking bar reproach – deserving shame or disgrace
creed – a statement of beliefs or guiding principles

45 “Mother to Son” stair – short form of “staircase” tacks – small nails landing – the level part of a staircase

46 Mini Lesson # ___ “Mother to Son” G? Who is the speaker of a poem?
by: Langston Hughes G? Who is the speaker of a poem?

47 The speaker Definition: the voice that speaks the poem’s words
a person whose attitude and personality are created by the poet. 2. The title gives clues about the speaker. 3. The poem generally shares speaker’s experiences and offers advice based on that experience. 4. Important: The speaker may or may not be the poet.

48 “The New Colossus” brazen – sounding loud and harsh
exiles – someone who is forced to leave his home country storied – having an interesting history pomp – a show of magnificence or splendor wretched – miserable or unhappy refuse – (pronounced “ref-use”) worthless, garbage teeming – filled tempest-tost – tossed about in commotion or chaos

49 Mini Lesson # __ “The New Colossus” by: Emma Lazarus
G? What literary devices does Lazarus use to enrich her writing?

50 Rhyme Scheme A pattern of end-line rhyme abbaa

51 Allusion A reference to a famous historical or literary figure for comparison purposes Colossus: a statue erected in Greece to honor the Greek sun god, Helios

52 “Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand . . .”
Alliteration The repetition of consonants within lines of poetry “Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand . . .” “ . . .glows world-wide welcome . . .”

53 “O Captain, My Captain” rack – torture, pain, or sorrow
exulting – celebrating keel – a timber which runs the center length of a ship grim – solemn trills – plays musical notes

54 Mini Lesson # __ “O’ Captain, My Captain” by Walt Whitman
G? What literary device does Whitman use to enrich his writing?

55 Extended Metaphor A figure of speech in which something is described as though it were something different Used to point out similarities between unlike things The comparison continues the entire length of the piece “fearful trip” the Civil War “the ship” the United States “the prize” victory “the port”  peace “captain” “father” Lincoln

56 from “The Passionate Shepherd” and “The Nymphs Reply to the Passionate Shepherd”
prive – enjoy dales – valleys melodious – singing madrigals – love songs kirtle – gown dumb – unable to speak wanton – extravagant wayward – tending to do as one pleases reckoning yields – gives into a time for the settling of accounts gall – bitterness Philomel – a nightgale that sings love songs

57 “Ring Out, Wild Bells” saps – drains the energy from
feud – disagreements redress – relieve, remedy, to set right strife – conflict modes – kinds or ways mournful – sad fuller minstrel – singer of the highest rank false pride – arrogance civic slander – dishonest statements made about other people foul – nasty narrow lust – focused greed

58 “The Road Not Taken” diverged – to move or extend in different directions from a common point (such as a fork in the road) undergrowth – low growing plant life on the floor of a forest trodden – to tread or walk on

59 Mini Lesson # ___ “The Road Not Taken” by: Robert Frost
G?: What literary device does Frost use to enrich his writing?

60 Extended Metaphor A figure of speech in which something is described as though it were something different Used to point out similarities between 2 unlike things The comparison continues throughout the entire length of the piece “diverging roads” major choices that people have to make in life

61 Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds within lines of poetry
“ Because it was grassy and wanted wear/Though as for that the passing there . . .”

62 “Skydiver” poised – held firmly in a steady position
interim – a period of time between events chasm – a deep split or gap in the Earth gap fanatic – overly enthusiastic steeple – the tall pointed part of a church grotesque – unnaturally odd or ugly

63 Mini Lesson # __ “Skydiver” literary devices
similes: comparisons using “like” or “as” “…like a clothed frog…” metaphors: comparisons in which one thing is said to be another “…the cloth flower opens…” “…an exclamation point upside down

64 Sonnet 18: Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day
temperate – mild untrimmed – not changed to a desired position lease – an agreed upon length of time owest – to have or possess

65 Personification Applying human qualities to the non-human
“ The eye of heaven shines . . .” “ Nor shall Death brag ”

66 Rhyme Scheme A rhyme pattern present at the end of lines of poetry
ABABC

67 “Sonnet XLIII from The Portuguese”
breadth - width

68 “Shiloh: A Requiem” swallows – birds which glide in flight
wheeling – to fly in a circular pattern solaced – comforted parched – dry, thirsty foemen – enemies undeceive – unable to fool or trick

69 Mini Lesson #___ “Shiloh: A Requiem” by: Herman Melville
G? What makes a requiem a requiem?

70 Requiem A written piece composed to honor the dead
Tone solemn, quiet, respectful, almost mournful Different forms: songs, chants, poems, etc.

71 “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”
queer – odd, unusual

72 Mini Lesson # __ “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”
by: Robert Frost G? What literary techniques does Frost use to enrich his writing?

73 Personification Giving human qualities to the non-human
“ he gives his harness bells a shake/To ask if there . . .”

74 Alliteration A repetition of consonants sounds within lines of poetry
“ He gives his harness bells . . .” “ dark and deep . . .”

75 Poetic devices Poetic form: the way the poem looks or is arranged on the page Written in lines, grouped in stanzas

76 Poetic devices, continued
Traditional form: each line has the same number of syllables and each stanza has the same number of lines 8 syllables per line and 4 lines per stanza

77 Poetic devices, continued
Regular rhyme pattern: predictable rhyme aaba ccdc eefe gggg

78 “There is No Frigate like a Book”
frigate – a ship used for escorting or patrolling coursers – swift, spirited horses offence – something that causes worry or irritation toll - price paid for travel frugal – careful in spending or using resources

79 Mini Lesson #___ “Waiting for the World to Change” By: John Mayer
G?: What makes propaganda propaganda?

80 Propaganda Definition: the use of facts, ideas or claims to persuade people to support a particular opinion or course of action Goal: intended to provoke strong feelings readers/listeners Frequently used in: * campaign speeches * advertisements * editorial articles

81 Common techniques quoting the opinions of experts 
“Chess master Mark Yoffie believes Fisher played the finest game of his career today.” giving endorsements by famous people “Supermodel Cara Ferguson says Victor is the only stylist she allows to touch her hair” using statistics  “Over 15% of American live below the poverty level.” saying most people agree with you  “Like myself, the citizens of this city want a clean sweep. We’re tired of politics as usual. We want to see new faces in City Hall.” Attacking an opponent or someone you disagree with Sam Belvic has ruined the baseball team. He has chosen poor players and overpaid them. Let’s fire him.

82 “What is Success?” “a redeemed social condition” – an improved problem in society like poverty, pollution, etc.


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