Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

What is practice research and how do we go about doing it? Jo Moriarty Southampton 5 th October 2007.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "What is practice research and how do we go about doing it? Jo Moriarty Southampton 5 th October 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 What is practice research and how do we go about doing it? Jo Moriarty Southampton 5 th October 2007

2 Outline Definition –What is ‘practice research’? Barriers to achieving it Examples –Suggesting that we underestimate what has been achieved Discussion

3 Ever felt like this? Adapted (gratefully) from McLeod (1999) –Do you sometimes read research articles and feel they bear no relationship to what you do? –In your work, are there times when you want to know more about why something is happening? –Would you like to know more about what other [social workers] do and what works for them? –Do you have a sense books are telling you what you already know?

4 And this? –As you have become more experienced, are you more aware of contradictions and paradoxes in what you do? If ‘yes’, you may be ready to embark on practitioner research! –John McLeod, (1999) Practitioner Research in Counselling, London, Sage Publications Ltd, pp 1-2

5 Starting point Pawson and colleagues (2003) identified five different types of knowledge –Organisational knowledge E.g. regulation and Codes of Practice –(GSCC, BASW) –Practitioner knowledge Often personal and context specific

6 Types of knowledge –Service user knowledge Knowledge gained from personal experience (‘experts by experience’) –Research knowledge Most ‘orthodox’ type of knowledge –Policy community knowledge Agencies, government departments, ‘think tanks’

7 Read more about it Types and quality of knowledge in social care –Ray Pawson, Annette Boaz, Lesley Grayson, Andrew Long and Colin Barnes –http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/kno wledgereviews/kr03.pdfhttp://www.scie.org.uk/publications/kno wledgereviews/kr03.pdf –Paper copies free

8 Theoretical knowledge Practice knowledge Trevithick’s framework Factual knowledge Knowledge

9 Based on…(1) Theories that –illuminate our understanding of people, situations and events –analyse the role, task and purpose of social work –relate to direct practice, such as practice approaches and perspectives

10 Based on…(2) Factual knowledge –Legislation –Agency policies Practice knowledge –Way ‘book knowledge’ is transformed into something useable and useful

11 So what? Increasing importance given to ‘evidence based’ approaches –Five outcomes for children in Every Child Matters Hierarchy of knowledge –Privileges some types of knowledge over others

12 Why we need more practice research Some types of knowledge easier to explain and justify –Explicit knowledge Research/policy community –Implicit or tacit knowledge harder to identify and describe Difference between ‘knowing what’ and ‘knowing how’ Often associated with practice

13 But… Can those pesky researchers ever agree! –Idea that there is a distinction between explicit and implicit knowledge has been challenged Jashapara (2007) – false distinction Similarities with Trevithick’s (2007) framework

14 Barriers to practice research Funding –Harder to access if on the ‘outside’ Resources –Adequacy of some professional training –Variable access to resources (books, journals and databases) Today –Opportunity to help break them down

15 Definition ‘Research carried out by practitioners for the purpose of advancing their own practice’ (McLeod, 1999: p8) –About counselling but equally relevant to social work

16 Example 1 Miracles R them: solution-focused practice in a social services duty team (Hogg and Wheeler, 2004) –Short term goal-focused approach based on idea that people already have resources that will help them to change –Team manager thought would improve service user involvement and reduce staff burnout so team trained in this approach

17 What they did Would it be feasible for other teams to be trained in this approach? –Undertook focus groups and interviews –Identified benefits and need for management support –Developed resources and training –Expanded to rest of authority

18 Example 2 Fair play: creating a better learning climate for social work students in social care settings (Barron, 2004) –Developed as a response to a student on practice placement being confused about his role in a setting where there was no defined social work role

19 What he did (1) Are the experiences of social work students different in social work and social care settings? –Interviewed six students in six sites Supervisors –Questionnaires to tutors –Informal discussion with day centre workers

20 What he did (2) Found that students and supervisors in social work settings were clearer about their role –Suggested need for supervisor training –Identified role for more whole-team discussions –Discussed how it would influence his own future practice

21 Example 3 Health care professionals' death attitudes, experiences, and advance directive communication behavior (Black, 2007) Slightly different to other examples –Focus is on research about practice Spent over 20 years as social worker and care manager with older people

22 What she did (1) Are professionals working with older people influenced by their own attitudes to death when discussing advance directives? –Survey of 135 nurses, physicians and social workers in upstate New York

23 What she did (2) Found that attitudes were influenced by personal experiences –More inclined to discuss if Took ‘positive’ attitude to afterlife Had recent personal experience of terminal illness Work helped inform grant application to provide training for care managers

24 Example 4 Own research –Study of social care services for people with dementia Sampling framework was 206 interviews with social workers –Respite services for carers Interviewing team included social workers

25 References Barron, C. (2004). Fair play: creating a better learning climate for social work students in social care settings. Social Work Education, 23 (1): Black, K. (2007). Health care professionals' death attitudes, experiences, and advance directive communication behavior. Death Studies, 31 (6): Hogg, V. & Wheeler, J. (2004). Miracles R them: solution-focused practice in a social services duty team. Practice, 16 (4): Moriarty, J. & Webb, S. (2000). Part of Their Lives: Community Care for People with Dementia. Bristol: The Policy Press.

26 Characterised by…(1) Research question born out of personal experience and a need to know Aims to make a difference to practice Uses reflexive self awareness to gain access to underlying meanings

27 Characterised by…(2) Limited in scope to fit in with time and resource constraints Addresses moral and ethical dilemmas of role as researcher/practitioner (Designed to enhance and facilitate counselling process)

28 Characterised by…(3) Researcher retains ownership of knowledge –Subjective personal ‘knowing’ as well as impersonal objective or ‘factual’ knowledge Results written up in a way consistent with principles listed above (McLeod, 1999: p8-9

29 Doesn’t mean… Not a special category of research –Overlap with internal evaluation/action research –Although some have argued it is Cochran-Smith and Lytle (1990) Not either/or distinction –Many professional researchers have backgrounds in practice –Way of understanding where researchers come from

30 Getting started… Identification of a problem or issue Choosing how to examine it in a systematic way Collecting information Analysing information Sharing results and seeing how they can be implemented

31 ‘Nothing’s perfect’ Criticisms of practice research –Concerns about absence of voice of service users –Seen as too uncritical –Concept has even been challenged –Practitioner research: evidence or critique? (Shaw, 2005)

32 Practitioners have… Advantage of existing knowledge about the topic Access to data –Colleagues –Service users –Records

33 Can get help from… Advice from academics –Practitioner training courses (McCrystal, 2000) Specialist resources –Social Care Institute for Excellence –Textbooks for professionals and students

34 Remember that… Academic and professional researchers have problems too! –Sampling –Design –Methods Not always apparent from ‘write ups’

35 Summary: Why do it? To help practitioners have more influence in decision making To increase the evidence base in a given area To think more carefully about the way we practise –Confirm or ‘discomfirm’ what we think (Taylor and White, 2006)


Download ppt "What is practice research and how do we go about doing it? Jo Moriarty Southampton 5 th October 2007."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google