Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Hamlet Key Quotes: 1. "To be - or not to be: that is the question " 2. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend -

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Hamlet Key Quotes: 1. "To be - or not to be: that is the question " 2. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend -"— Presentation transcript:

1 Hamlet Key Quotes: 1. "To be - or not to be: that is the question " 2. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend - and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry “ 3. “Let me see. Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now how abhorred in my imagination it is--my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols, your songs, your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? (Act V, scene i).table 4. “I lov'd Ophelia: forty thousand brothers / Could not, with all their quantity of love, / Make up my sum. (Act V, scene i).Make up 5. “ Hamlet: Refrain tonight, / And that shall lend a kind of easiness / To the next abstinence, the next more easy; / For use can almost change the stamp of nature, and either lodge the devil, or throw him out / With wondrous potency”. (III, iv, )stamp 6. “Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me! You would play upon me, you would seem to know my stops, you would pluck out the heart of my mystery...do you think I am easier to be played upon than a pipe? 7. “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark " 8. “In heaven; send thither to see. If your messenger find him not there, seek him i' the other place yourself. But, indeed, if you find him not within this month, you shall nose him as you go up the stairs into the lobby. (Act IV, scene iii). 9. “O! from this time forth, / My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth! (Act IV, scene iv). 10. “Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander returneth into dust; the dust is earth, of earth we make loam, and why of that loam whereto he was converted might they not stop a beer barrel? (Act V, scene i).

2 Pictures & Quotes If music be the food of love, play on

3 Cowards die many times before their deaths So wise so young, they say do never live long

4 1. This soliloquy, probably the most famous speech in the English language, is spoken by Hamlet in Act III, scene i (58–90). His most logical and powerful examination of the theme of the moral legitimacy of suicide in an unbearably painful world, it touches on several of the other important themes of the play. Hamlet poses the problem of whether to commit suicide as a logical question: “To be, or not to be,” that is, to live or not to live. 2. I live by this rule. I don't borrow money. I don't lend money. I will give a person money, but not lend it. A unpaid loan puts a blemish on the friendship. Husbandry( in this case) mean economy. So borrowing money isnt good for your personal economy. Youre living outside of your means 3.Just in case you doubted whether or not Hamlet were mad, his conversation with dead Yorrick's skull in the graveyard should help you decide. This apostrophe is a sober reminder that all will die. 4. Hamlet's behavior toward Ophelia throughout the play leads one to believe he truly is mad. He praises her, insults her (commanding her to a nunnery), kills her father, jumps in her grave and hyperbolically expresses his love 5. Despite his apparent madness, Hamlet demonstrates a keen understanding of human nature as he counsels his wife to abstain from relations with the new king. 6. Hamlet chastises Guildenstern through the deft use of metaphor after encouraging Guildenstern to play the flute to which he claimed to be unable. Hamlet demonstrates cunning in his tongue-lashing of Guildenstern. 7. If by rotten you mean the dead king's ghostghost showing up to inform his son that he was murdered by his brother and that he wants revenge, then, indeed, something is rotten in the state of Denmark. The rottenness goes beyond the murder of the king: it eminates from the queen who marries so quickly after the king's death. It also infects Prince Hamlet who has gone mad at the death of his father and quick marriage of his mother. Hamlet's dithering and lack of strong leadership during the crisis does little to heal the rot. Because the rottenness exists at the head of government, the entire state must suffer unless a stronger leader (Fortinbras, for example) arrives.

5 8.In heaven; send thither to see. If your messenger find him not there, seek him i' the other place yourself. But, indeed, if you find him not within this month, you shall nose him as you go up the stairs into the lobby. (Act IV, scene iii). 9.Hamlet understands the cowardice in his delay. He's evidence enough of Claudius' guilt yet refuses to exact revenge. He vows to himself that from this moment forth he is committed to killing the king. 10.Hamlet philosophizes the end of all humans, theorizing that the greatest of kings are nothing more than hole pluggers after they die. Hamlet has no faith that anything exists after death, a belief that stays him from taking his own life, a life he feels is full of sorrow and pain

6 Rome & Juliet – West Side Story: Romeo and Juliet is the story of the relationship between the son and daughter of two families, which are enemies, the Montagues and the Capulets. Their families are against their plan to marry, and the story ends in the death of both lovers. In West Side Story, instead of families, there are two rival gangs in New York City, the Sharks and the Jets. One gang is "American" and the other gang is Puerto Rican. A young man from one gang falls in love with a young woman whose brother is in the other gang. These young lovers, too, die at the end of the story. West Side Story concerns itself more with culture and prejudice, while in Romeo and Juliet, the enmity between the two families is more about political power than culture.


Download ppt "Hamlet Key Quotes: 1. "To be - or not to be: that is the question " 2. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend -"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google