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Bound for South Australia 1836 Conflict Onboard Week 14 At sea in the ‘Africaine’, 1836. by John Michael Skipper. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of South.

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Presentation on theme: "Bound for South Australia 1836 Conflict Onboard Week 14 At sea in the ‘Africaine’, 1836. by John Michael Skipper. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of South."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bound for South Australia 1836 Conflict Onboard Week 14 At sea in the ‘Africaine’, by John Michael Skipper. Courtesy of the Art Gallery of South Australia

2 Overview Between February and July 1836 nine ships left Britain bound for the newly created province of South Australia. On-board the ships were passengers who over many long months braved the perils of the ocean, including some of the most treacherous seas in the world to begin a new life on the other side of the world. This resource uses the stories from these nine ships as recorded by the passengers and crew in their personal journals.

3 Contents Introduction Journal entries Inquiry Questions Relevant images Glossary of terms

4 Introduction This week we hear that not everyone is getting along so well onboard our ships. A ‘disagreeable quarrel’ has broken out between the chief mate and the carpenter onboard the John Pirie. Meanwhile George Kingston and Captain Lipson have had yet another row onboard the Cygnet. We’ll have a look at the types of situations that lead to conflict onboard and the strategies used to solve problems between people onboard.

5 Journal entries Thursday 26 May 1836 John Pirie journal writer, on board the John Pirie wrote: The Wind has contd from the S,Eastward, since Tuesday, accompd with most beautiful Weather _______ This Afternoon a disagreeable Quarrel took place between Mr Davies, (our chief Mate ) and the Carpenter, ___ It appears the latter wanted some Nails, when the Mate told him to be more careful of the Ships Stores, and charged him with having recd a great many things in London, of which he could give no account, this was passionately denied by the Carpenter, and caused very angry Words, that soon produced Blows, however they were parted without having hurt each other much, after which Capt Martin coincided with the Mate, and blamed the Carpenter for not fulfiling his duty, in many respects, but all of which the latter strongly denied, and complain’d of having recd very hard usage, ever since leaving England, however, after making use of very strong Language, to each other, they separated mutually displeased _________chief MateShips Stores

6 Saturday 28 May 1836 Boyle Travers Finniss, on board the Cygnet wrote: Within 18 miles of Bahia on the Brazilian coast, steering S.W. This being the King’s birthday, drank H.M.’s health with 3 times three, and sent several bottles of wine to the steerage. Kingston and the Captain had another row. Saw a large species of gull.King’s birthday

7 Inquiry Questions What types of conflicts might occur onboard? How might conflicts have been resolved? What was the captain’s role in resolving conflict?

8 Images Captain Thomas Lipson, ca Image from the State Library of South Australia, [B11169]

9 Glossary of Terms chief Mate First officer directly coming under the command of the captain. Ships’ Mates were responsible for supervising watches, crew, navigation and safety equipment, and sometimes even served as the ship’s doctor. King’s birthday King William IV’s birthday was celebrated in May His 71st birthday actually fell on 21 August Historically, official birthday celebrations of the British monarch bore no relation to the actual day of the current monarch’s birthday. Ships Stores Provision of food, drink, medical comforts, and equipment for all passengers and crew to survive the voyage. Return to Journal Entries


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