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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Group 8: Ideas Notes- 1.Destruction of innocence; unveiling the truth & its consequences, self- discovery, etc. 2.Guilt, personal.

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Presentation on theme: "Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Group 8: Ideas Notes- 1.Destruction of innocence; unveiling the truth & its consequences, self- discovery, etc. 2.Guilt, personal."— Presentation transcript:

1 Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Group 8: Ideas Notes- 1.Destruction of innocence; unveiling the truth & its consequences, self- discovery, etc. 2.Guilt, personal responsibility, remorse By: Chris Leigh, Andrew Bertha, and Michael Albert

2 Themes involving Innocence 1. Those who lose their innocence survive - because those who haven't lost their innocence die (Elizabeth, Clerval, William) to those who did lose it. – many different types of innocence – knowledge, morality 2. Loss of innocence is parallel to the gaining/pursuit of wisdom in the novel

3 Quotes to #1 Innocence – (40-A), “A human being in perfection ought to preserve a calm and peaceful mind and never to allow passion or a transitory desire o disturb his tranquility. I do not think that the pursuit of knowledge is an exception to this rule. if the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affection and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind. if this rule were always observed; if no man allowed any pursuit whatsoever to interfere with the tranquility of his domestic affections, Greece had not been enslaved, Caesar would have spared his country, America would have been discovered more gradually, and the empires of Mexico and Peru had not been destroyed.” (end of Ch 4) “Unhappy man! Do you share my madness? Have you drank also of the intoxicating draught? Hear me – let me reveal my tale, and you will dash the cup from your lips!” – Frankenstein to Malcolm (28)

4 More Quotes to #1 Frankenstein loss of innocence— (33-A; end of Ch 3) “Such were the professor’s words—rather let me say such the words of the fate—enounced to destroy me. As he went on I felt as if my soul were grappling with a palpable enemy... and soon my mind was filled with one thought, one conception, one purpose. So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein—more, far more, will I achieve... I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.

5 Quotes to #2 Innocence of Clerval – “Meanwhile Clerval occupied himself, so to speak, with the moral relations of things. The busy stage of life, the virtues of heroes, and the actions of men, were his theme…” (33) Innocence of Elizabeth "The saintly soul of Elizabeth shown like a shrine- dedicated lamp in our peaceful home," (33)

6 Another quote for #2! Unveiling the truth and its consequences— (60-A) “My first thought was to discover that I knew of the murderer and cause instant pursuit to be made. But I paused when I reflected on the story that I had to tell... I well knew that if any other had communicated such a relation to me, I should have looked upon it as the ravings of insanity”

7 Theme involving Guilt, Personal Responsibility, and Remorse Any guilt that one person has is self created. -people create their own conflicts/problems. “I called myself the murderer of William, of Justine, and of Clerval.” (157)

8 Quotes (Ch 7, p. 60-A) Victor Frankenstein “No one can conceive the anguish I suffered during the remainder of the night... I considered the being whom I had cast among mankind and endowed with he will and power to effect purposes of horror, such as the deed which he had now done [murdering William]... nearly... my own spirit let loose from the grave and forced to destroy all that was dear to me.” (last lines of Ch 8, p 71-A) Victor “Thus spoke my prophetic soul, as, torn by remorse, horror, and despair, I beheld those I loved spend vain sorrow upon the graves of William and Justine, the first hapless victims to my unhallowed arts.”

9 MORE QUOTES!! (beginning of Ch 5, p. 42-A) “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, he beauty of the dream vanished and breathless horror disgust filled my heart.” -immediate beginnings of regret and remorse for his creation “Have my murderous machinations deprived you also, my dearest Henry, of life? Two I have already destroyed; other victims await their destiny…” (157) – upon seeing Clerval’s body

10 YES!! MORE QUOTES! “As I looked on him, his countenance expressed the utmost extent of malice and treachery. I thought with a sensation of madness on my promise of creating another like to him, and trembling with passion, tore to pieces the thing on which I was engaged.” (148) – pre-emptive guilt

11 One Last Quote!! “... yet your presence will, I hope, revive our father... and your persuasions will induce poor Elizabeth o cease her vain and tormenting self-accusations.” –Ernest Frankenstein (61-A,Ch 7)

12 Work Cited Picture of Alice Cooper - albums.blogspot.com/2010/07/alice- cooper.htmlhttp://mediafire- albums.blogspot.com/2010/07/alice- cooper.html Picture of Wayne and Garth – “Feed my Frankenstein” – Alice Cooper


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