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Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners Joyce VanTassel-Baska, Ed.D. Jody and Layton Smith Professor in Education Executive Director,

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Presentation on theme: "Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners Joyce VanTassel-Baska, Ed.D. Jody and Layton Smith Professor in Education Executive Director,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction for Gifted Learners Joyce VanTassel-Baska, Ed.D. Jody and Layton Smith Professor in Education Executive Director, Center for Gifted Education The College of William and Mary New Mexico State Conference July 25, 2007

2 William & Mary Models for Literacy Development William & Mary Models for Literacy Development Concept Development Model Concept Development Model Reasoning Model Reasoning Model Research Model Research Model Literature Web Literature Web Jacob’s Ladder Jacob’s Ladder Hamburger Model Hamburger Model Dagwood Model Dagwood Model Vocabulary Web Vocabulary Web Analyzing Primary Sources Analyzing Primary Sources Reasoning about a Situation or Event Reasoning about a Situation or Event

3 Literature Web Key Words READING Feelings Ideas Structure Images/Symbols

4 Wild Geese You do not have to be good. You do not have to walk on your knees for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting. You only have to let the soft animal of your body love what it loves. Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine. Meanwhile the world goes on. Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain are moving across the landscapes, over the prairies and the deep trees, the mountains and the rivers. Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air, are heading home again. Whoever you are, no matter how lonely, the world offers itself to your imagination, calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting – over and over announcing your place in the family of things. -- M. Oliver

5 Vocabulary Web Source (sentence where you saw the word): WORD: Example: Analysis Word Families: Part of Speech: Stems: Origin: Definition: Synonyms: Antonyms:

6 Hamburger Model for Persuasive Writing Reason Introduction (State an opinion.) Conclusion Reason Elaboration

7 Dagwood Model Reason Claim/Opinion/Introduction Background Elaboration Other Points of View Elaboration ReasonOther Points of View Elaboration ReasonOther Points of View Conclusion Details Elaboration

8 Elements of Reasoning -- Paul, 1992 Issue/ Problem Evidence/ Data Point of View Implications/ Consequences Inferences Concepts/ Ideas Purpose/ Goal Assumptions

9 Question Tree based on Reasoning Model What is the question or issue of interest? What is the question or issue of interest? What is the purpose of _____________?What is the purpose of _____________? What points of view or perspectives are important toWhat points of view or perspectives are important to understanding __________________? understanding __________________? What assumptions underlie each perspective on ________?What assumptions underlie each perspective on ________? What data/evidence support a given perspective on _____?What data/evidence support a given perspective on _____? What inference can be made about ______________, basedWhat inference can be made about ______________, based on the evidence? on the evidence? What are the implications and consequences of __________?What are the implications and consequences of __________?

10 Reasoning Sample In mid-July, I called the county office that handles streetlights. I pointed out that low-growing tree branches in my neighborhood were obscuring a number of the streetlights. I further pointed out that some of the streets were nearly totally dark. The county informed me that trimming trees away from lights was not one of its duties and I was told to call Virginia Power. When I called Virginia Power, I was informed that trimming limbs away from streetlights was not its responsibility and I should call the county. I told the electricity company that the county had stated that Virginia Power was responsible for the work. I also informed the county that Virginia Power’s position is that the county must do the work. These two organizations are in no hurry to resolve this problem, for the limbs are growing longer as the streets grow darker. I can only hope that if you print this note, maybe I’ll get some action. -- from The Virginia Gazette, October 3, 1998

11 Reasoning about a Situation or Event What is the situation? Who are the stakeholders? What is the point of view for each stakeholder? What are the assumptions of each group? What are the implications of these views?

12 Features of Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension Program Moves students from lower level comprehension to higher level thinking and analysis of texts Moves students from lower level comprehension to higher level thinking and analysis of texts Employs poetry, fables and myths, and nonfiction selections Employs poetry, fables and myths, and nonfiction selections Engages learners in a discussion of textual meaning in dyads or small groups Engages learners in a discussion of textual meaning in dyads or small groups Employs questions and tasks as the stimulus for comprehending text Employs questions and tasks as the stimulus for comprehending text Uses an interactive assessment system Uses an interactive assessment system

13 Jacob’s Skill Ladders Generalization Category/Classification Details/Examples Title of Reading Selection A3A3 A2A2 A1A1 Consequences and Implications Cause and Effect Sequencing B3B3 B2B2 B1B1 Main Idea/Theme Evidence/Inferen ce Context/Setting/Characterization C3C3 C2C2 C1C1

14 Delilah She has blue eyes like the ocean. Her tongue like a rose. Her nose like a heart. Her tail like a fan. Her black coat like the night sky. By Casey Carroll Grades 4-5 Honorable Mention Center for Gifted Education Talent Search

15 Delilah C1C1 C3C3 C2C2 Theme/Concept  Write a poem like Delilah to describe your pet or an animal you know. (Use the poem as your model.) Evidence/Inference  What evidence is important in deciding on Delilah’s identity?  What or who is Delilah in the poem, based on the evidence? Characterization  What words does the poet use to show Delilah as a lovable creature?

16 Analyzing Primary Sources Document Title:_______________________________________________ Document Title:_______________________________________________ Establishing a context and intent for the source: Establishing a context and intent for the source: Author: Author: Time/When was it written? Time/When was it written? Briefly describe the culture of the time and list related events of the time Briefly describe the culture of the time and list related events of the time Purpose (Why was the document created?) Purpose (Why was the document created?) Audience (Who was the document created for?) Audience (Who was the document created for?) Understanding the Source: Understanding the Source: What problems/issues/events does the source address? What problems/issues/events does the source address? What are the main points/ideas/arguments? What are the main points/ideas/arguments? What assumptions/values/feelings does the author reflect? What assumptions/values/feelings does the author reflect? What actions/outcomes does the author expect? From whom? What actions/outcomes does the author expect? From whom?

17 Analyzing Primary Sources Evaluating/Interpreting the source: Evaluating/Interpreting the source: Authenticity/Reliability (Could the source be invented, edited or mistranslated? What corroborating evidence do you have about the source? Does the author know enough about the topic to discuss it?) Authenticity/Reliability (Could the source be invented, edited or mistranslated? What corroborating evidence do you have about the source? Does the author know enough about the topic to discuss it?) Representative. (How typical is the source of others of the same period? What other information might you need to find this out?) Representative. (How typical is the source of others of the same period? What other information might you need to find this out?) What could the consequences of this document be? (What would happen if the author’s plans were carried out? What could happen to the author when people read this? How might this document affect or change public opinions?) What could the consequences of this document be? (What would happen if the author’s plans were carried out? What could happen to the author when people read this? How might this document affect or change public opinions?) What were the actual consequences? What really happened as a result of this document? What were the actual consequences? What really happened as a result of this document? Short-term/Long-term: What new or different interpretation does this source provide about the historical period? Short-term/Long-term: What new or different interpretation does this source provide about the historical period?

18 The Gettysburg Address Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation: conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate – we cannot consecrate – we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be here dedicated to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. -- Abraham Lincoln, 1863

19 Center for Gifted Education Contact Information Center for Gifted Education The College of William and Mary P.O. Box 8795 Williamsburg, VA http://cfge.wm.edu

20 Kendall/Hunt Publishing Contact Information Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company 4050 Westmark Drive Dubuque, IA Contact: Laura Toebes , ext


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