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Jay Stanley Senior Policy Analyst Speech, Privacy and Technology Program Editor, Free Future blog 202-715-0818 The Future of Our Privacy.

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Presentation on theme: "Jay Stanley Senior Policy Analyst Speech, Privacy and Technology Program Editor, Free Future blog 202-715-0818 The Future of Our Privacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jay Stanley Senior Policy Analyst Speech, Privacy and Technology Program Editor, Free Future blog The Future of Our Privacy

2 I. THE CHALLENGE TO OUR PRIVACY

3 The challenge to our privacy: Technology revolution A burgeoning security establishment Profit Motives

4 The challenge to our privacy: Technology revolution A burgeoning security establishment Profit Motives

5 Change at light speed

6

7 “Disruptive technologies”

8 Smart grid

9

10 DNA

11 Video surveillance

12 Video Surveillance: a new era

13 Face recognition

14 Iris recognition

15 Behavioral analytics

16 License plate recognition

17 Location-tracking

18 The ultimate in location tracking:

19 Drones

20 Advanced imaging technologies

21

22 The Ultimate Example: Total Information Awareness

23 NYC/Microsoft “Domain Awareness System”

24 Meanwhile: Moore’s Law Charts: Zoomer Magazine, Computer Measurement Group

25 The Future of Moore’s Law Intel Core i Processor: $ on Newegg

26 The Future of Moore’s Law Today: $294.99

27 The Future of Moore’s Law Today: $ In 20 years: $0.03

28 The Future of Moore’s Law

29 Also following Moore’s Law 20 years: 1,000-32,000x today’s power

30 Faster, cheaper – and smarter

31 Hans Moravec: 2020s

32 In whose interest?

33 How will AI be used?

34 Are we ready for all this?

35 The challenge to our privacy: Technology revolution A burgeoning security establishment

36 The Security State NSA: 30,000 employees CIA: 20,000 employees Others: many more Overall IC: at least $57 billion Oversight? Not much. FBI: 33,000

37 Swinging the telescope inward

38

39 FISA Amendments Act of 2008  General Warrants. No specificity required. (All US- London traffic?)  Little judicial oversight. FISA court only reviews the government’s “targeting” and “minimization.” No role overseeing actual use of surveillance power.  No limits on use of data. Huge databases, stored forever, shared with anyone, re-used for any purpose.  Domestic s included. Location uncertain? Go ahead!  Immunity for lawbreakers. Don’t try this at home!

40 Cybersecurity

41 The challenge to our privacy: Technology revolution A burgeoning security establishment Profit Motives

42 Internet advertising

43

44 Data brokers & “big data”

45

46 An emerging surveillance- industrial complex  Recruiting or pressing private companies into service  Lobbying by companies for more surveillance  Partnerships with data companies

47 Many options for accessing private data 1.Ask for data to be shared voluntarily 2.Simply buy information 3.Demand it using legal powers 4.“Bake in” surveillance 5.Create regularized systems for standing access to records of private activities

48 Are we ready for all this?

49 Jurisprudence off-track Reasonable expectation” standard Third-party doctrine

50 Arbitrary situation

51 Congress isn’t keeping up either: Just a few things have changed since ECPA drafted in 1986 … 1990: World Wide Web created 1994: Yahoo & Amazon founded 1998: Google founded 2004: Facebook launched

52 Lifecycle of an Unopened > 180 days < 180 daysWarrant Subpoena or 2703(d) with notice Opened Header info Basic subscriber info (name, address, connection records, etc) Subpoena or 2703(d) NO notice req’d

53 And was one of the specific technologies that existed in 1986! What about…  Search  Location-based services  Cloud Computing

54 FISA Amendments Act

55 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes

56 Human are social animals Constantly monitoring, finely aware of how we’re perceived by those around us

57 That means privacy gaps rarely last

58 Lag time in privacy awareness

59 Chilling Effects: The Facebook “blandification” effect

60 Chilling effects can also be spurred by many technologies Surveillance cameras Government eavesdropping Offline data collection

61 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes

62 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes 2.Law/practice changes

63 Where we just find invasions intolerable and change the world to end them ECPA reform Commercial privacy regulation Drone regulation

64 ACLU in the courts NSA spying

65 ACLU in the courts National Security Letters

66 ACLU in the courts Cell phone location data

67 ACLU in the courts Laptops at the border

68 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes 2.Law/practice changes

69 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes 2.Law/practice changes 3.Expectations change

70 Public-private boundary The home Campaign donations Real estate transactions Professional confidences Marriage Arrests Video rental records License Plates

71 Public-private boundary The home Campaign donations Real estate transactions Professional confidences Marriage Arrests Video rental records License Plates

72 Public-private boundary The home Campaign donations Real estate transactions Professional confidences Marriage Arrests Video rental records License Plates

73 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes 2.Law/practice changes 3.Expectations change

74 How this plays forward 1.Behavior changes 2.Law/practice changes 3.Expectations change 4. Things just get worse

75 III. WHAT MUST BE DONE?

76 What Must Be Done? 1. Enact comprehensive privacy laws

77 What Must Be Done? 2. Enact technology-specific privacy laws

78 What Must Be Done? 3. Create institutions to enforce privacy laws

79

80 What Must Be Done? 4. Revive the 4 th Amendment

81

82 Jay Stanley Speech, Privacy and Technology Program Free Future blog: Contact info:

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