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1 Presentation on use of Statistics by Provincial Planning 10-11 October 2013.

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1 1 Presentation on use of Statistics by Provincial Planning 10-11 October 2013

2 The presentation will focus on utilising the FSGDS on how statistics was used Various snap shots of different slides of FSGDS presentation will be used to illustrate this 2 Focus of the presentation

3 3 Rationale and Significance of the FSGDS 1994 1999 GEAR 2004 2009 1996 IDP, LED AsgiSA, JipSA, NSDP 2010 5+2 Priorities/Outcome Based Approach 2011 Chapter 1 Rationale and Significance of the FSGDS Chapter 2 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Chapter 3 Provincial Vision and Strategic Vision Chapter 4 Provincial Strategic Growth and Development Pillars Chapter 5 Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation

4 4 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Over the years, the province has experienced a significant decline of the mining sector. Mining’s share was 16% in 1996 and by 2010, this has declined to 8% and 7% in 2012. In 1996, the mining sector employed about 118 000 people. This figure was about 180 000 in the late 1980s. This dropped to about 33 000 by 2010. Layoffs are still continuing in this sector with devastating consequences not only on individuals, but also the areas that significantly depend on this sector. The structure of the provincial economy that limits job creation 1

5 5 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Another sector is agriculture which has experienced relative decline and is now stagnant. In 1996 agriculture contributed 5.3% to the provincial economy compared to 3.5% in 2010 and 3.7% in 2012. Notwithstanding these challenges, agriculture still accounts for a significant number of informal employment in the province. At the same time, besides high labour absorption rate, agriculture is important for food security and rural development. The structure of the provincial economy that limits job creation 1

6 6 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis The manufacturing sector contributed 16.4% of the provincial gross domestic product in 2012. However, the petro-chemicals sub-sector made up more than 85% of this sector and contributed on average, 9.6% to the provincial economy. The challenge is that the manufacturing sector is concentrated in terms of ownership, production and geographical location. The sector is largely disconnected from the rest of the provincial economy. The structure of the provincial economy that limits job creation 1

7 7 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Unemployment is the most serious challenge confronting the province. In the Free State, unemployment rate increased from 32% in the third quarter of 2012 to 33.2% in the fourth quarter of 2012, and 33.1% in the second quarter of 2013. Unemployment can mainly be attributed to the relative decline in agriculture and the mining sectors combined with the limited industrial base in the province. A total of 25 000 job losses were recoded in the agricultural sector followed by mining at 4 000. in contrast, significant jobs were created in the community and social services, 28 000. The most unemployed are largely women, the youth and unskilled workers Increasing unemployment 2

8 8 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis The Free State’s contribution to the national economy was 5% in 2010. This was down from the 5.8% contribution it made to the national economy in 1996. In 2011, the real economic growth rate, at 2005 constant prices, was 2.5% in the Free State in comparison to 3.5% for the entire country. The New Growth Path emphasises employment creation in the following sectors: Infrastructure, agriculture, mining, the green economy, manufacturing and tourism. In the province, the construction and the electricity sector that also forms the basis of the infrastructure job driver have stagnated at 1.7% between 2011 and 2012 whilst electricity have marginally declined from 2.4% to 2.3% in the same period. Whilst agriculture has seen a marginal growth from 3.3% in 2011 to 3.7% in 2012, mining declined from 7.7% to 7%, and manufacturing stagnated at 11.7% in the same period. Although the Free State’s captured 7.3% of the foreign tourists in 2010 which was 8.2% in 2009, tourism still remain significant for the growth and development of the province. Other sectors such as the green economy are yet to be fully developed. It is also anticipated that major infrastructure investments will bring the desired growth. Poor Growth Performance 3

9 9 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis The provincial spatial economy exhibits increasing levels of economic concentration. While Matjhabeng has lost its share of the economy due to mine downscaling Metsimaholo and Mangaung have increased their share. In 1996 these two municipalities contributed approximately 45% of the provincial economy, compared to 55% in 2010. Together, these two municipalities had only approximately 35% of the Free State’s population in 1996, which in 2011 was 32% of the entire 2.7 million provincial population. If Matjhabeng is also taken into account, these three municipal areas contribute 70% of the Free State’s economy. Metsimaholo is also the municipality with the largest economic growth rate of 4.6% per annum between 1996 and 2010. Other municipal with moderate economic growth between 1996 and 2010 are: Mangaung (2.6%); Letsemeng (3% due to mining activities and high valued agricultural products) and Moqhaka (2.1%. Increasing Spatial Concentration of Economic Activity Excludes the Majority 4

10 10 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis In 2001, it was estimated that 2% of paved roads are in a very good condition while 6% are in a good condition, 29% are in a fair condition, 36% are in a poor condition and 27% are in a very poor condition. About 82% of the road network had not been resealed in the past 12 years The under-utilisation of infrastructure, especially rail, is connected to the decline in mining and the difficulties faced by the agricultural sector. This in turn led to disinvestment in rail. Generally, the backlogs in infrastructure are due to historic decline in public sector investment since the late 1970’s. Major investments in water were last seen in the early 1980’s. The result has been dilapidation of water catchment areas, dysfunctional irrigation systems, especially canals and tunnels. The 2012 Stats SA General Household Survey released on 23 August 2013 indicates that 59,3%of residents rated the provision of water services as good with only 5% indicating water in the province is not safe to drink Under-Utilisation and Declining Infrastructure 5

11 11 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis The educational profile shows laudable improvement in respect of particularly Grade 12 pass rates since the demise of apartheid. The Grade 12 pass rate in the province has increased from 75.7% in 2011 to 81.1% in 2012. Despite these attainments, as revealed by Stats SA 2011 Census, 7.1% of persons aged 20 years and above in the province had no schooling (Xhariep 12.9%, Lejweleputswa 6.8%, Thabo Mofutsanyana 9.1%, Fezile Dabi 7.3% and Mangaung 4.3%). The shift in the structure of the economy towards finance and business services leaves the majority of the province’s youth behind, creating a mismatch between the elementary skills of the provincial population and needs of the evolving economy. The capital-intensive petro-chemicals sector requires skilled people, The roll-out and maintenance of infrastructure requires artisans, engineers and builders, which cannot be produced in required amounts in the light of the low quality of basic education. Poor Quality of Education, Skills Shortages and Mismatches 6

12 12 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Additionally, the morbidity and mortality profiles of the Free State are dominated by HIV/AIDS. According to 2011 statistics, 70% of the case load in the public health system were attributed to HIV and AIDS related illnesses. The 2011 National Antenatal Sentinel HIV & Syphilis Survey in South Africa, HIV prevalence amongst antenatal women was 32%. The highest prevalence was in Fezile Dabi at 35.6%, followed by Lejweleputswa at 34.2%, Thabo Mofutsanyana at 31.9%, Mangaung at 29.9% and Xhariep at 26.1%. The estimated provincial HIV prevalence in the general population (15- 49 years) increased from 19.47% in 2010 to 19.58% in 2011. The shortage of skilled health professionals also presents a serious challenge. Not only does it impact on the quality of the services provided, it also has a negative bearing on the management of infrastructure and hospitals. Despite some of these challenges, the 2012 Stats SA General Household Survey released on 23 August 2013 indicates that 68.4% users of the public healthcare facilities in the province are very satisfied with those facilities compared to only 6% who said they were very dissatisfied. The Capacity of the Health System is Unable to Deal with the High Disease Burden 7

13 13 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Poverty remains a huge socio-economic challenge facing the province. According to SASSA, the total number of grants paid grew from nearly 850 000 in 2010 to 949.44 in June 2013 which represent 35% of the province’s entire population. Income inequality has also worsened from 0.59 to 0.64 over the same period. An assessment of poverty in the broader sense reveals that 51.0% of the Free State population is living in poverty. This means that approximately 1,122,500 people were living in poverty in 2010. In this context social grants and other government transfers become a major source of income for many people. High Poverty Levels, Income Inequality and Low Incomes 8

14 14 Provincial Growth and Development Analysis Three environmental concerns that need to be addressed are Water Availability and Quality, Climate Change, Land Use and Biodiversity Conservation. Water quality management needs to take place at the source, as well as at the level of distribution or use. A recent report assessing water quality data in the Orange River identified certain gaps in the present monitoring system. Specific problems shown by the report are the discontinuation of sampling at strategic points, poor sampling frequency and important variables not being measured. Climate projections for southern Africa show that the greatest increase in mean temperature will possibly occur over the central interior where the Free State is located. The arid and semi-arid regions towards the western interior are very likely to experience an increase of 2 to 3  C in maximum temperature The dominant land use in the Free State is agriculture which accounts for 90% of the total area of the province. There is also significant urbanisation taking place Preserving the Environment 9

15 Provincial Vision and Strategic Pillars Free State Vision 2030 By 2030, the Free State shall have a resilient, thriving and competitive economy that is inclusive with immense prospects for human development formation anchored on the principles of unity, dignity, diversity, equality and prosperity for all. Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Education, Innovation and Skills Development Improved Quality of Life Sustainable Rural Development Build Social CohesionGood Governance Vision 2030 acknowledges the central role that the state must play in addressing the historical legacy of dispossession, marginalization and domination. It recognizes the nexus between the state and the people. The draft Free State Vision 2030 draws on the experiences of the people in shaping the future they want. Chapter 3,4&5 of the NDP Chapter 9 of the NDP Chapter 8,10,11,12 of the NDP Chapter 6 of the NDP Chapter 15 of the NDP Chapter 12 and 14 of the NDP

16 16 Provincial Strategic Growth and Development Pillars Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Pillar 2: Education, innovation and skills development Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Pillar 4: Sustainable rural development Pillar 5: Build Social Cohesion Pillar 6: Good governance Driver 1: Diversify and expand agricultural development and food security Driver 6: Ensure an appropriate skills base for growth and development Driver 7: Curb crime and streamline criminal justice performance Driver 13: Mainstream rural development into growth and development planning Driver 14: Maximise arts, culture, sports and recreation opportunities and prospects for all communities Driver 15: Foster good governance to create a conducive climate for growth and development Driver 2: Minimise the impact of the declining mining sector and ensure that existing mining potential is harnessed Driver 8: Expand and maintain basic and road infrastructure Driver 9: Build sustainable human settlements Driver 3: Expand and diversify manufacturing opportunities Driver 10: Provide and improve adequate health care for citizens Driver 4: Capitalise on transport and distribution opportunities Driver 11: Ensure social development and social security services for all citizens Driver 5: Harness and increase tourism potential and opportunities Driver 12: Integrate environmental concerns into growth and development planning

17 17 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Driver 1: Diversify and expand agricultural development and food security Actions: Marketing and promoting agriculture as a professional career Establish, maintain and equip agri-schools with skilled and qualified teachers Revitalise agri and Further Education Training colleges Review and update admission requirements for Agricultural students at tertiary institutions Develop the training rogrammes with the changing and future needs of the agricultural sector Infuse agricultural training with entrepreneurial focused training and development programmes Implement voluntary internship programmes for final year and post graduate students Establish and maintain mentorship programmes for potential farmers and students Develop a farm worker career path and appropriate training system Strengthen agricultural research capacity in government and tertiary institutions Identify, research and promote competitive products Promote sustainable agricultural practices to protect the environment Implement human resource development programmes for emerging farmers Implement a programme to develop and employ black farm managers Increase labour intensive agricultural practices to increase employment rates

18 18 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation: Agricultural Potential Mangaung Metro, Nala and Dihlabeng: maize, wheat, cattle and sheep. Distinct produce such as peaches, cherries, apples, cut flowers, sorghum, asparagus, beans, potatoes, cabbage and carrots are also produced in Dihlabeng. Municipalities with above average agricultural potential are Tswelopele, Setsoto, Maluti-a-Phofung, Nketoana, Moqhaka, Mafube and Metsimaholo

19 19 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Driver 2: Minimise the impact of the declining mining sector and ensure that existing mining potential is harnessed Actions: Establish an inclusive operational mining support body to oversee mining lifespan Invest in key infrastructure priorities and programmes that are secondary to mining Monitor the process of compliance with the mining applications, exploration and development Develop and support partnerships consisting of business, government and mining companies Increase local procurement to the Free State Implement mine tourism initiatives Promote small-scale mining in sandstone, clay, salt and diamonds where possible Empower local entrepreneurs to benefit from aggregates Promote rehabilitation as part of mining processes Open up opportunities for new mining initiatives Re-use mining infrastructure in line with spatial development plans

20 20 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation: Mining Potential Two considerable gold reserves with an estimated 20 year life span still exist in Lejweleputswa district covering parts of Matjhabeng, Nala and Ngwathe, Metsimaholo municipalities. Whilst there is high production of diamonds in Moqhaka, production of this commodity is limited in Letsemeng municipality There is also significant potential for mining of low grade coal in Matjhabeng, Nala, Moqhaka, Ngwathe and Metsimaholo municipalities. There is some lower value mining potential in salt in Masilonyana, Tswelopele, Tokologo and Letsemeng. Clay fields in Moqhaka, Ngwathe and Metsimaholo. There are gypsum fields in Tokologo and discrete uranium in Setsoto and Dihlabeng.

21 21 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Driver 3: Expand and Diversify Manufacturing opportunities Actions: Identify and research potential downstream activities Facilitate and support downstream activities, especially in support of the agro-manufacturing complex Provide appropriate and adequate ICT infrastructure Partner with Higher Education Institutions in commercialising research Capacity building for local manufacturers, e.g. improve access to technology, maintenance services and skills Facilitate the availability of appropriate technical skills through the revitalisation of the FET colleges and technical schools Facilitate the development and maintenance of local and provincial infrastructure to support knowledge-intensive industries Facilitate and support downstream activities, especially in support of the agro-manufacturing complex Revitalise existing but less successful subsectors such as textile, food and beverages etc. through access to markets, skills and finance

22 22 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation: Manufacturing Potential Metsimaholo is the leading locality with high manufacturing due to petroleum and chemicals sub-sector. Mangaung metro has above average manufacturing potential in the fuel, petroleum, chemicals, fuel, rubber and plastics. Mangaung also has potential in the food and beverage sub-sectors of manufacturing Matjhabeng, Dihlabeng and Moqhaka also have an above average potential in the manufacturing

23 23 Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Driver 4: Capitalise on Transport and Distribution Opportunities Actions: Investigate the potential of freight and distribution for economic development Strengthen inter-governmental relations regarding transport infrastructure investment Regular engagements with state owned enterprises with respect to planned infrastructure expenditure to support local manufacturing Develop: o Harrismith Logistics Hub o N8 corridor (including rail) Optimise the potential of existing regional airfields Develop a provincial road network plan which defines an inter-regional Strategic Public Transport Network (SPTN) indicating primary and/or feeder/district routes, linking primary and secondary nodes Establish provincial transport corridors that are aimed at re- invigorating small town economies and promoting spatial economic inclusion Improve road infrastructure Improve the public transport facilities Improve rural public transport services through setting up scheduled subsidised public transport services to improve access to services Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation

24 24 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation Pillar 1: Inclusive economic growth and sustainable job creation Driver 5: Harness and Increase Tourism Potential and Opportunities Actions: Introduce basic training and skills development programme for tourism Capitalise on FET colleges and training institutions to provide appropriate tourism skills Support and maintain local tourism infrastructure Develop and implement a tourism-network strategy within the province and across provincial borders Enhance local government capacity for tourism development Strengthen local and provincial tourism business forums Ensure after-hours information and tourism access at tourism office Establish an integrated tourism website Support differentiated tourism product development: Conferencing/Nature-based tourism in rural areas/Adventure tourism/ Education/ Medical/ Exhibitions/ Sport/Mining/Agriculture/Festivals/Small town attractions/ Domestic heritage

25 25 Pillar 1: Inclusive Economic Growth and Sustainable Job Creation: Tourism Potential The only locality rated as having high tourism potential is Bloemfontein in Mangaung Metro. The following municipalities have also been categorised as municipalities with above-average tourism potential: Metsimaholo, Dihlabeng, and Matjhabeng. Other towns with proven tourism potential, though not adequately reflected in the data, are Clarens, Parys, Frankfort, Fouriesburg, Puthaditjhaba, Clocolan, the Memel area and Phillipolis.

26 26 Pillar 2: Education, innovation and skills development Driver 6: Ensure an appropriate skills base for growth and development Actions: Intensify and expand school management and performance programmes to ensure effective and efficient teaching ethics and environment Improve qualifications and performance of existing educators through bursaries, continuous professional development, mentoring and coaching focusing on mathematics and physical science Ensure that universities produce demand-driven qualified educators Intensify early childhood hub of service programme Ensure provision of adequate and timeous learning materials and equipment Institutionalise mother tongue education for foundation phase to address numeracy and literacy Implement a focused recruitment programme to attract suitable candidates for the education profession Capacitate school governing bodies of targeted schools to play integral role in improving education Develop and implement a specialised programme for mathematics and physical science for targeted schools Establish an operational, inclusive support system to foster collaboration between educational institutions, work places and the public sector Ensure continuous responsive curriculum development in line with provincial inclusive growth and development needs and priorities

27 27 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 7: Curb crime and streamline criminal justice performance Actions Enforce the Domestic Violence Act Expand youth crime prevention and capacity building programmes Intensify and roll out victim empowerment programmes to all municipalities Ensure sector policing at high contact crime police stations Intensify and expand the community policing forum programme Improve administration and management through training, capacity building and performance management systems Enhance capacity by providing adequate human resources and equipment Improve and expand borderline security including the management thereof in collaboration with social partners Intensify programmes to improve court performance, court and case flow management, case backlogs and priority crime litigations Improve whistle-blowing and witness protection programmes Expand visible policing to enhance crime prevention Improve detective services through improved forensic evidence, criminal record centres and crime intelligence Establish specialised units in line with provincial needs Expand the utilisation of reservists Implement innovative and alternative ways of delivering justice through technology, witness preparation, specialised prosecution, community justice and public awareness

28 28 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 8: Expand and maintain basic and road infrastructure Actions: Develop water, sanitation and electricity master plans for municipalities Dedicate funding for maintenance of current infrastructure Establish partnerships in selective municipalities for service delivery with regard to yellow fleet, waste management and water service delivery Identify and facilitate the implementation of infrastructure by municipalities for development in the recognised growing municipal areas Ensure compliance of waste water treatment (new and upgraded) with the Green Drop standards in all towns and new developments Promote and facilitate alternative sanitation and water infrastructure Promote and facilitate solar water heating and arial / street lighting for energy saving Promote and facilitate alternative sanitation and water infrastructure Train management and administrative levels to ensure an understanding of the technical processes of service delivery Roll out laboratories and consolidate capacity in existing laboratories to assist with water quality programme Recruit, employ and retain qualified technical staff Promote and facilitate solar water heating and arial / street lighting for energy saving

29 29 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 9: Build sustainable human settlements Actions: Expand the public-private partnership approach for sustainable human settlements Improve access to the Integrated, Residential Development Programme for basic infrastructure Improve the quality of Spatial Development Frameworks to include master planning in areas of interest, town planning schemes, availability of services Release surplus government land for human settlements Curb and manage informal land invasion Improve basic town planning / engineering services at provincial level Enhance opportunities for capacity building in town planning, project management, engineering, urban design and property management Establish the provincial credit authority to improve a credit linked housing programme Promote socially integrated human settlements in order to support social cohesion Improve access to the basic social and economic amenities programme Facilitate the implementation of the communal land right programme Intensify the informal settlements upgrading programme Research and promote alternative building methods and material for eco- friendly environments

30 30 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 10: Provide and improve adequate health care for citizens Actions: Improve and expand the CCMT (HIV/AIDS) programme to reduce HIV and AIDS related deaths Improve and expand TB Management Programmes Improve and expand non-communicable disease programmes in the four main critical areas of mental health, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease Employ, train and retain community health workers for PHC teams Intensify general health promotion and lifestyle programmes Build new health care facilities, children’s hospital (chronic dispensing unit, community health centres, nursing colleges, laundries, accommodation for health professionals) Maintain and upgrade hospitals Strengthen hospital management capacity Expand capacity of existing tertiary institutions to train medical professionals Invest in district-focused health research Implement an appropriate incentive scheme for health workers in rural areas

31 31 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 11: Ensure social development and social security services for all citizens Actions: Align and integrate poverty alleviation initiatives with sector departments plans, including municipalities Increase the number and develop the capacity of auxiliary social workers, community development workers and lay counsellors and expansion of NPO/NGO services, with emphasis on laws that consider protection, empowerment and regulation Improve the capacity of the provincial government to provide support and monitor and evaluate the implementation of the regulatory framework for NGOs Strengthen collaboration and coordination between all sector departments, NGOs, and municipalities to increase the impact and effectiveness of these programmes Ensure the mainstreaming of vulnerable groups such as women, youth, children and people with disabilities as priority groups during the implementation of these programmes Deepen the approaches of prevention and community-based, reduction of dependency in all these programmes

32 32 Pillar 3: Improved quality of life Driver 12: Integrate environmental concerns into growth and development planning Actions: Intensify the monitoring and evaluation of river health and water quality (both surface and ground water Improve the standards of drinking water treatment (Blue Drop) Improve waste water management (Green Drop – enforcement) Monitor and mitigate the impact of acid mine drainage to minimise the effects thereof on both surface and groundwater quality Optimise water management practices, especially in the agricultural sector through the improvement of soil and water management Implement economic incentives for environmental protection Reduce Green House Gas emissions in industries through alternative methodologies and processes Develop climate change mitigation strategies pertaining to the core functions of provincial departments Adopt and integrate alternative energy approaches (solar, wind, hydro and biofuels) to reduce the carbon footprint of the Province’s energy requirements Adopt the sustainable development approach of a ‘Green Economy’ by increasing the use of green energy, waste recycling schemes, facilitation of ecotourism opportunities and the advocacy of labour-intensive economic development

33 33 Pillar 4: Sustainable rural development Driver 13: Mainstream rural development into growth and development planning Actions: Intensify the land reform programme while providing beneficiaries with technical skills and financial resources to productively use the land Review the effectiveness of the existing land redistribution programme and introduce measures to speed up land reform Expand the agrarian reform programme focusing on the systematic promotion of agricultural co- operatives Provide adequate skills, finance and markets to promote the emergence of new value-chains Improve access to inputs such as machinery, equipment, seeds by rural-based enterprises Build dedicated economic and social infrastructure specifically designed to accelerate economic opportunities for rural communities. Expand social services to all rural communities throughout the province Establish agri-villages in selected areas Strengthen the partnership between government and the institution of traditional leadership. Provide adequate, affordable and reliable transport and storage facilities for rural-based enterprises

34 34 Pillar 5: Build Social Cohesion Driver 14: Maximise arts, culture, sports and recreation opportunities and prospects for all communities Actions: Encourage the use and development of indigenous languages Facilitate access to external funding for deserving and emerging artists Make provision for the appointment of full-time cultural officers at municipal level Make provision for the appointment of full-time art managers, art administrators and artists at selected provincial art centres Establish working relationships between provincial libraries, arts and cultural institutions (art centres and theatres) and schools to enhance grassroots mass participation Improve collaboration between communities and library services to address improved communication and community aspirations Improve the safeguarding of library buildings and equipment Expand talent development programmes and high performance capacity academies to groom talented and international athletes Expand mass participation in sports and recreation programmes Strengthen coordination and collaboration amongst provincial sport structures and between provincial and local sports structures Expand inter-provincial school sport competitions Strengthen and support provincial sport federations

35 35 Pillar 6: Good governance Driver 15: Foster good governance to create a conducive climate for growth and development Actions: Improve the level and quality of political oversight mechanisms Establish and ensure that financial oversight committees (internal and external) and subcommittees are functional Internal audit (departments and municipalities) such as risk management, tender committees, anti-corruption committees, finance committee and legislature Create units to investigate and finalise cases of financial mismanagement Develop mechanisms to extend the ‘lifespan’ of competent heads of department, municipal managers, and chief financial officers Foster collaboration across different spheres to ensure the deployment of competent managers where necessary Implement mentorship, succession planning and learnership programmes in leadership and management Institutionalise practices to ensure recruitment and appointment of competent people in managerial posts Promote integrated development orientation through a shared vision and development trajectory Build the necessary monitoring and evaluation capacity in provincial departments and municipalities Define the role and contribution of public entities in planning and implementation

36 36 Towards FSGDS and NDP Implementation On 25 June 2013, Minister Trevor Manuel, Premier Ace Magashule together with EXCO, all Mayors and some National Planning Commissioners had a dialogue to explore a pilot project to begin the implementation of the NDP. Based on the FSGDS, pillar 6 - Good Governance (Chapter 13 & 14 of the NDP) was identified as the most critical for the province. The province has developed a detailed NDP Free State Pilot Action Plan and will engage with the NPC secretariat to finalise it. The Plan identifies priorities, targets and timelines, and will serve as a performance and impact measure. The province has also developed the FSGDS Implementation Plan aligned with the NDP. This plan provides systematic indicators and targets meant to bring focus in the priorities that should inform departmental strategic and performance plans. It will infuse MTSF priorities and serve as the basis for clusters’ programmes of action. The province has completed the NDP and FSGDS Alignment Reference Book. The Reference Book presents a shared, consistent and coherent development agenda as outlined in the NDP and how it has found expression in the province through the FSGDS. Similarly, the province is also developing the NDP, FSGDS and IDP Alignment Guide including the NDP, FSGDS, Strategic Plans and APP Alignment Guide. These guides will serve as instruments of mutually reinforcing policy actions across government. They will detail the national, provincial and local government imperatives and their spatial growth and development application, and how they should inform integrated planning.

37 37 Towards FSGDS and NDP Implementation We also commenced a process to review and develop the following sector specific strategies within the overarching provincial development bounds outlined in the NDP and FSGDS: Rural Development Strategy/ Economic Development Strategy / Poverty Alleviation Strategy/ Spatial Development Framework /Agriculture Development Strategy / Skills Development Strategy Of outmost importance for the province has been the identification, packaging and implementation of major catalytical project based on provincial potential set in the NDP and FSGDS. These are to serve as the anchors to drive growth and development. The NDP Schema for Partial targeting identifies the following areas of potential as pivotal for the province: Durban- Free State– Gauteng corridor -SIP 2 The N8 corridor as a strategic trans-national development corridor linking Bloemfontein and Lesotho Green economic zone in the Xhariep district Resource critical areas in the goldfields region Water resource areas The province had thus had engagements with the following national departments to explore areas of cooperation in beginning to examine the potential of these projects : Economic Development, DTI, Public Enterprise, NPC and DBSA. As a step towards implementation, the province will establish a central coordinating unit to oversee the execution of these projects

38 Towards FSGDS and NDP Implementation 38 Principles to be applied In view of the completion of the NDP, immediate endorsement of the FSGDS is critical to begin with the implementation process The FSGDS must form the basis for planning in the province The FSGDS will constantly be updated in line with new developments Sector strategies must be based on the long-term programmes and strategies of the FSGDS

39 Snap shots of slides presented clearly indicate the level of detail required for provincial strategic planning 39 In conclusion

40 40 Thanks


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