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Phase II TECH 682 Technology Systems Assessment & Innovation Summer 2006 Team 2 David Fusco Rebecca Geraghty Jason Liu Rob McDaniel Pradeep Mohanty Greg.

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Presentation on theme: "Phase II TECH 682 Technology Systems Assessment & Innovation Summer 2006 Team 2 David Fusco Rebecca Geraghty Jason Liu Rob McDaniel Pradeep Mohanty Greg."— Presentation transcript:

1 Phase II TECH 682 Technology Systems Assessment & Innovation Summer 2006 Team 2 David Fusco Rebecca Geraghty Jason Liu Rob McDaniel Pradeep Mohanty Greg Price Rick Schneider Blake Wentz

2 2 Presentation Outline Overview Assessment Tool #7 Tool #8 Tool #9 Tool #10 Tool #11 Tool #12 Project Data Project Status Chats and Threads Summary & Conclusion

3 3 Project Overview Document the findings, analysis, conclusions and recommendations of the Team-2 based on their work on six LSSQTT tools  Tool #7: Team building, and communicating the project and culture  Tool #8: Technological system leadership for change and improvement  Tool #9: Assessing technological infrastructure for innovation  Tool #10: Foundational Infrastructure to standardize improvement  Tool #11:Robust Design for New Product Development, Innovation  Tool #12: Assessing technological decision making  Follow an excel based documentation framework that confirms to ISO 9000 Context: A simulated project involving construction of a server room/data center as it relates to disaster recovery

4 4 Assessment Team assessment is important for continuous improvement Team-2 continues to use standard assessment tools  Multiple team discussions revolving around the value of numeric rating in a class setting  Qualitative feedback still remains to be crucial Assessment enhancements proposed in the areas of  Specific Leader assessment  Enhanced assessment matrix

5 5 Tool #7 Team Building, Communicating the Project & Culture 1.Lean six sigma quality transformation toolkit (LSSQTT)  should be used by today's manager to create competitive advantage through quality improvement  based around the Quality Management System (QMS) principle 2. Team culture, communication  impacts our ability to solve problem, and to learn and grow as a team  it is very important to establish a team culture based on mutual trust, respect and openness 3. Team synchronized cross functionality  focuses on synergy among team members  addresses efficient and effective use of team members’ expertise towards accomplishing team goal

6 6 Tool #7 (continued) Team Building, Communicating the Project & Culture 4. Moving projects and teams forward – start of suggestive system  emphasizes clear documentation of the problem/project goals and buy-in by stakeholders  team should be formed after project proposal is approved  team membership must be based on the expertise needed to accomplish the project goals 5. Team behaviors, characteristics, general considerations  it is natural for a successful team to go through 4 phases – forming, storming, norming and performing  team facilitator should focus on “process”  team leader’s focus is “content” 6. Problem solving tools, relationships  PDSA (Plan, Do, Study, Act) drives continuous improvement  resolving issues often help creation of documentation to improve processes

7 7 Tool #8 Tech. Systems Leadership for Change & Improvement 1. Change, improvement, leadership  a leader needs to be a good listener, motivator, and work with the systems directly to fully understand their impact and where value can be added to improve the processes 2. Supervisor leader: manager, team facilitator, champion  a supervisor must be a change agent and needs to understand and manage both people and technology  should cultivate several traits to be successful in this role 3. Rewarding, recognizing, redirecting: Growing & handling leaders  leadership development is critical to the continued team success  Good supervisors use reward, recognition and redirecting, and groom team members to replace them 4. Consensus building: Leader as communicator  team leader must possess good communications skills and have the ability to lead the team, through directed questions, answers, and comments toward a common goal

8 8 Tool #8 (continued) Tech. Systems Leadership for Change & Improvement 5. Disciplined management of technology  significant factor for change and improvement  disciplined workers set standards and adhere to them, know the job, follow procedures, train, conduct regular meetings, put out fires, pay attention to details, organize for discipline, encourage self starters and self guidance, eliminate problems, weed out incompetent individuals, deal with problems, and have realistic expectations 6. Removing barriers to improvement  leaders should energize people to overcome major political, bureaucratic, and resource barriers by addressing often unfulfilled human needs 7. Management vs. leadership, change, improvement relationships  quality and management issues are inter-twined - poor management results in poor quality

9 9 Tool #8 (continued) Tech. Systems Leadership for Change & Improvement 8. Leading change, strategic planning  it is vital to have a strategic plan for any group so that the goals of the organization are clearly defined so that all group members are aware of the goals and the overall direction of the team  strategic planning brings change  Leadership of an organization must be committed to change

10 10 Tool #9 Assessing Technological Infrastructure for Innovation 1.Lean six sigma teams, problem solving  Focuses on data, documentation and synchronized leadership  Uses 3 fundamental phases for problem solving – assessment, analysis and action  could help businesses streamline their operations and to conduct team based improvements 2.Enhanced design, creativity, five why’s  By repeatedly asking the question "Why" (five is a good rule of thumb), one could peel away the layers of symptoms which can lead to the root cause of a problem 3. Managing innovation, design phases  Managing innovation requires an understanding of fluidity in project management constantly heading toward a justifiable end  A successful way to manage innovation is by doing design in phases, planning for change, and having check points for go/no-go decisions

11 11 Tool #9 (continued) Assessing Technological Infrastructure for Innovation 4. Applied technical research  key elements are - identifying a research problem, reviewing literature related to the problem area, developing the methodology, developing cost estimates for the research project and preparing proposal (s) to secure funding, conducting the study, and documenting the findings  drives improvement and offers competitive advantage 5. Process and applications engineering  improve productivity and quality in technological organizations and functions  fundamental to ongoing improvement and necessary for competitiveness in business and industry  more hand-on utilizes knowledge and experience, and focuses on the materials, processing and mechanical aspects of the technological organization or function

12 12 Tool #9 (continued) Assessing Technological Infrastructure for Innovation 6. Product launch systems for innovation  must be viewed in the context of the "total system",  important to the success of the total system as launch system procedures influence all new product programs  conduct post launch review to document lessons learned and to identify best practices 7. Patents, USPTO  the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) oversees and enables protection of Intellectual Property (IP) and allows for exclusionary tactics by patent holders for a period of typically 20 years  patentable items include innovated systems, processes, machines, compounds and manufactured products, certain designs, and newly created (and reproduced) plants  Protected IP = competitive advantage

13 13 Tool #10 1. ISO, QS introduced, overviewed The ISO 9000 is a framework for a quality management system. ISO 9000 is increasingly viewed as the standards under which all other quality functions are addressed. The key is standardization which is fundamental for the quality system to be successful. The ISO 9000 is a framework for a quality management system. ISO 9000 is increasingly viewed as the standards under which all other quality functions are addressed. The key is standardization which is fundamental for the quality system to be successful. 2. ISO 9000 based requirements, QS focus The QS (Quality System) guidelines are consistent with ISO 9000 requirements. Under ISO 9000 there are twenty requirements within the broader context of quality improvement: Management Responsibility, Quality System, Contract Review, Design Control, Document and Data Control, Purchasing, Control of Customer Supplied Product, Product Identification and Traceability, Process Control, Inspection and Testing, Control of Inspection, Inspection and Test Status, Control of Non-conforming Product, Corrective and Preventative Action, Handling, Storage, Packaging, Preservation and Delivery, Control of Quality Records, Internal Quality Audits, Training, Servicing and Statistical Techniques. The QS (Quality System) guidelines are consistent with ISO 9000 requirements. Under ISO 9000 there are twenty requirements within the broader context of quality improvement: Management Responsibility, Quality System, Contract Review, Design Control, Document and Data Control, Purchasing, Control of Customer Supplied Product, Product Identification and Traceability, Process Control, Inspection and Testing, Control of Inspection, Inspection and Test Status, Control of Non-conforming Product, Corrective and Preventative Action, Handling, Storage, Packaging, Preservation and Delivery, Control of Quality Records, Internal Quality Audits, Training, Servicing and Statistical Techniques.

14 14 Tool #10 (Continued) 3. ISO 9001 streamlined: TS standard for a new century ISO/TS 16949:2002 focuses on an organization’s ability to realize its stated goals as well as achieve customer satisfaction by delivering conforming parts on time to customer specification at acceptable cost. ISO/TS 16949:2002 concentrates on the effective linkages in the company's business plan, quality policy, quality objectives and measures. The standard specifies how objectives can be achieved and deployed throughout the organization. ISO/TS 16949:2002 focuses on an organization’s ability to realize its stated goals as well as achieve customer satisfaction by delivering conforming parts on time to customer specification at acceptable cost. ISO/TS 16949:2002 concentrates on the effective linkages in the company's business plan, quality policy, quality objectives and measures. The standard specifies how objectives can be achieved and deployed throughout the organization. 4. Environmental standard The ISO standard deal with the environmental performance. This system promotes a common approach to environmental management similar to quality management. The ISO standard deal with the environmental performance. This system promotes a common approach to environmental management similar to quality management.

15 15 Tool #10 (Continued) 5. Managing Process: OPCP as one key The ongoing process control plan is (OPCP) a dynamic document that is an important enhancement for lean management efforts. The OPCP is designed to document key methods, techniques, and other general information used in the processing applications for the product under discussion or development. In a team environment, it is essential that the elements of the OPCP be understand by all members of the project team, which may include outside sources, such as vendors and suppliers. Consequently, the OPCP also identifies and documents key customer information in the form of specifications, evaluation methods, sample and inspection, analysis and reaction methods, as well as other information vital to controlling and improving the processes involved. The ongoing process control plan is (OPCP) a dynamic document that is an important enhancement for lean management efforts. The OPCP is designed to document key methods, techniques, and other general information used in the processing applications for the product under discussion or development. In a team environment, it is essential that the elements of the OPCP be understand by all members of the project team, which may include outside sources, such as vendors and suppliers. Consequently, the OPCP also identifies and documents key customer information in the form of specifications, evaluation methods, sample and inspection, analysis and reaction methods, as well as other information vital to controlling and improving the processes involved. 6. Managing based on standardization Standard operating procedures is one of the primary key components of continuous improvement. The formation of such documents assume a strong team attitude and a willingness to change towards improvement. An organization needs to realize that it needs to continually evaluate itself over time and that customers sill continue evaluating their services regardless of internal goals and expectations. Standard operating procedures is one of the primary key components of continuous improvement. The formation of such documents assume a strong team attitude and a willingness to change towards improvement. An organization needs to realize that it needs to continually evaluate itself over time and that customers sill continue evaluating their services regardless of internal goals and expectations.

16 16 Tool #11 1. New product development, innovation life cycle There are five commonly identified stages for new product development and innovation, the so-called product life cycle. These include 1)incubation/introduction, 2)growth, 3)maturity, 4)satuation, and 5)decline. It is fairly straightforward concept that a new product takes time to grow to maturity and eventually declines and may be replaced. However, in reality, it is rather difficult to determine precisely where each phase ends and starts. New product development and innovation is not always a clear-cut, logical and step by step process that falls neatly into an academic model. In the competitive market, it is the vision and strategy from the collective leadership team from a company that makes the difference between thriving and barely surviving. 2. DOE and FEA as robust problem solving systems Design of Experiments (DOE) is about knowledge based applications for technological problem solving. DOE applications have the following features: Detail oriented. Detail oriented. Force users to study various relationships. Force users to study various relationships. Provide the basis for discovering relationships. Provide the basis for discovering relationships. Disclose process improvements incrementally. Disclose process improvements incrementally. Require a mature organization with solid technical expertise. Require a mature organization with solid technical expertise. Cost intensive. Cost intensive. Require the understanding that problems are not solved quickly. Require the understanding that problems are not solved quickly.

17 17 Tool #11 (continued) 3. Finite element analysis (FEA) Finite element analysis (FEA) is used to predict the responses of structures and materials to environmental factors such as force, heat, and vibration. In FEA, complex structures are divided into a large number of small elements (called nodes) whose stress-strain relationships are approximated by creating a mesh network of these nodes using software programs. In general, FEA, allows us to test designs against laws of nature. 4. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) The FMEA tool will provide a methodology for analyzing failures and/or potential failures. Like a vulnerability patched prior to an exploitation attempt, a potential failure analyzed and mitigated prior to its failure can prove to be very valuable for all who ultimately would be affected by the failure. Unlike root- cause analysis, the goal of FMEA is to analyze failures and/or potential failures to determine the likelihood of failure or repeated failure. Main issues addressed using FMEA are: 1. Root cause, effect. 2. Value analysis. 3. Innovation. 4. Layout improvement. 5. Upfront planning. 6. Understanding the customer. 7. Teaching and learning 8. Documenting process 9. Ongoing improvement, measurement. 10. Prevention. 11. Reaction and enhancement 12. Team process 13. Robust improvement. 14. Regular review systems. 15. Broad communication.

18 18 Tool #11 (continued) 5. FMEA steps, procedures and broader innovation relationships Describe the product/process and its function Describe the product/process and its function Create a block diagram of the product or process Create a block diagram of the product or process Complete the header on the FMEA Form worksheet: Product/System, Subsys./Assy., Component, Design Lead, Prepared By, Date, Revision (letter or number), and Revision Date Complete the header on the FMEA Form worksheet: Product/System, Subsys./Assy., Component, Design Lead, Prepared By, Date, Revision (letter or number), and Revision Date Identify Failure Modes Identify Failure Modes Describe the effects of those failure modes Describe the effects of those failure modes Establish a numerical ranking for the severity of the effect Establish a numerical ranking for the severity of the effect Identify the causes for each failure mode Identify the causes for each failure mode Enter the Probability factor Enter the Probability factor Identify Current Controls (design or process). Current Controls (design or process) are the mechanisms that prevent the cause of the failure mode from occurring or which detect the failure before it reaches the Customer Identify Current Controls (design or process). Current Controls (design or process) are the mechanisms that prevent the cause of the failure mode from occurring or which detect the failure before it reaches the Customer Determine the likelihood of Detection Determine the likelihood of Detection Review Risk Priority Numbers (RPN) Review Risk Priority Numbers (RPN) Determine Recommended Action(s) to address potential failures that have a high RPN Determine Recommended Action(s) to address potential failures that have a high RPN Assign Responsibility and a Target Completion Date for these actions Assign Responsibility and a Target Completion Date for these actions Indicate Actions Taken Indicate Actions Taken Update the FMEA as the design or process changes, the assessment changes or new information becomes known Update the FMEA as the design or process changes, the assessment changes or new information becomes known

19 19 Tool #11 (continued) 6. Quality function deployment The main goal of QFD is to enhance competitiveness and to simplify and communicate the multitude of phases of technology development and deployment. This is accomplished by aligning with the following guidelines: Understand product function Understand product function Deriving quality within product functions Deriving quality within product functions Prioritization for improvements Prioritization for improvements Quality vs. function determination Quality vs. function determination Listening to the voice of the customer Listening to the voice of the customer Enhanced communication Enhanced communication Understand the competition Understand the competition Reduce costs Reduce costs Foster innovative thinking Foster innovative thinking Become more efficient Become more efficient Internal and external knowledge transfer Internal and external knowledge transfer Develop cross-functional teams Develop cross-functional teams

20 20 Tool #12 1. Infrastructural Problem Solving Tools Summarized: Data and Documentation OPCP (Ongoing Process Control Plan) is designed to document key methods, techniques and other general information used in the processing applications for the product. The emphasis is on better understanding of the processes involved in producing the product. Related to OPCP, SOPs document standard procedures and methods followed by the organization. There should be a SOP to address change control changes to standard procedures are not done in an ad- hoc manner and the changes are properly documented. OPCP (Ongoing Process Control Plan) is designed to document key methods, techniques and other general information used in the processing applications for the product. The emphasis is on better understanding of the processes involved in producing the product. Related to OPCP, SOPs document standard procedures and methods followed by the organization. There should be a SOP to address change control changes to standard procedures are not done in an ad- hoc manner and the changes are properly documented.

21 21 Tool #12 (Continued) 2. Time Study, Work Methods, Work Sampling The content of Tool 12 deals with making decisions that affect the engineering processes involved in efficient operations. One particular aspect includes time study, work methods, work sampling, and flow charting. These topics examine the flow of work from start to finish, and look at the human aspect as well as human interaction with machines. Understanding the basic flow of a process from start to finish in essential, particularly if considering refining the overall process. Time studies should be focused on understanding the amount of time involved in a process, not how efficient the worker is that is performing the task. Work methods examine the way a job is performed, are there motions in the process that can be eliminated, steps that can be refined to make the process more efficient. Work sampling involves performing the task repeatedly to get a good sampling of the time and movements involved in the process in order to make better decisions. Flow charting gives a reference to how a job or process should be done. The content of Tool 12 deals with making decisions that affect the engineering processes involved in efficient operations. One particular aspect includes time study, work methods, work sampling, and flow charting. These topics examine the flow of work from start to finish, and look at the human aspect as well as human interaction with machines. Understanding the basic flow of a process from start to finish in essential, particularly if considering refining the overall process. Time studies should be focused on understanding the amount of time involved in a process, not how efficient the worker is that is performing the task. Work methods examine the way a job is performed, are there motions in the process that can be eliminated, steps that can be refined to make the process more efficient. Work sampling involves performing the task repeatedly to get a good sampling of the time and movements involved in the process in order to make better decisions. Flow charting gives a reference to how a job or process should be done.

22 22 Tool #12 (Continued) 3. Basic Cost Issues Cost analyses helps with decision making. It can provide estimates of what a program's costs and benefits are likely to be, before it is implemented. Cost analyses needs to be based on very rough estimates of costs and expected benefits. However, it is not guessing work. Cost estimates have to relive on accurate and adequate input data to arrive at the logical and appropriate judgment. Cost analyses helps with decision making. It can provide estimates of what a program's costs and benefits are likely to be, before it is implemented. Cost analyses needs to be based on very rough estimates of costs and expected benefits. However, it is not guessing work. Cost estimates have to relive on accurate and adequate input data to arrive at the logical and appropriate judgment. 4. Safety, Quality and Productivity Without grasping the entirety of what can result from not having a safety plan or a culture of safety, companies can incur significant costs, direct and indirect monetary costs. The literature clearly supports LSSQTT Tool #12 by providing additional insight into cost justification specifically for each topic of "Safety, quality and productivity: basis for ergonomics." Without grasping the entirety of what can result from not having a safety plan or a culture of safety, companies can incur significant costs, direct and indirect monetary costs. The literature clearly supports LSSQTT Tool #12 by providing additional insight into cost justification specifically for each topic of "Safety, quality and productivity: basis for ergonomics."

23 23 Tool #12 (Continued) 5. Statistical Quality, Basis for Data Based on tool 12 content regarding Statistical Quality, Basis For Data as applied to objective 1, it was found that a controlled sampling of many factors discussed in the above objectives are required in order to create a descriptive as well as an inferential statistical tool to be used in planning a disaster recovery data center for the present day but also begin to address the future needs of such a facility. Based on tool 12 content regarding Statistical Quality, Basis For Data as applied to objective 1, it was found that a controlled sampling of many factors discussed in the above objectives are required in order to create a descriptive as well as an inferential statistical tool to be used in planning a disaster recovery data center for the present day but also begin to address the future needs of such a facility. 6. Attributes, Checklists Tool 12 relates the use of attribute charts and checklists. These tools besides being user friendly allow the team early detection of problems. So these tools may precede or assist the use of the 8 d problem solving tools we have previously deployed. Tool 12 relates the use of attribute charts and checklists. These tools besides being user friendly allow the team early detection of problems. So these tools may precede or assist the use of the 8 d problem solving tools we have previously deployed.

24 24 Tool #12 (Continued) 7. SPC, X-bar and R SPC (Statistical Process Control) is a statistical technique, used during a processing procedure, to help understand possible improvement areas, identify best practices, and help in making decisions based on the data collected. It is implemented to: SPC (Statistical Process Control) is a statistical technique, used during a processing procedure, to help understand possible improvement areas, identify best practices, and help in making decisions based on the data collected. It is implemented to: 1. determine when to adjust procedure parameters 2. describe the delta, or variation, that exit in any given process This process control is based on two primary components – the mean (or X bar) and the range of data variables. Using these two data sets, an operator has the ability to take on the responsibility for reducing product variation and overall process improvement. This is obtained by analyzing consistent and accurate production output. There are two primary situations where SPC can be implemented. In either situation, SPC cost savings is realized over time, usually in years. This process control is based on two primary components – the mean (or X bar) and the range of data variables. Using these two data sets, an operator has the ability to take on the responsibility for reducing product variation and overall process improvement. This is obtained by analyzing consistent and accurate production output. There are two primary situations where SPC can be implemented. In either situation, SPC cost savings is realized over time, usually in years.

25 25 Project Data General background statement to define the nature of the work: The role technology plays in today's organization is that of the primary communication tool, data storage, analysis vehicle, etc. and is virtually indispensable. Organizations and even the Government have programs in place that will allow them "to go paperless". As technology is perhaps the single most important asset to maintain, an organization needs to invest a large amount of interest in protecting it's infrastructure. Disaster recovery and business continuity have become more and more integrated into IT strategic plans and need to be considered even more for critical data centers. Redundant internet and WAN services need to follow multiple paths to ensure the % uptime that mission critical services demand. Today's IT manager needs to not only understand the technology that physically resides in the server room, but those business processes that are dependant on it. Understanding personnel and business rules will help shape the overall design of the ideal data center.

26 26 Project Data (Continued) General Problem Statement: General Problem Statement: Design a disaster-recovery server room/data center for a modern organization that can accommodate an organization based on the physical constraints of the server room/data center (existing remodel or new construction) and also considers the following aspects: Design a disaster-recovery server room/data center for a modern organization that can accommodate an organization based on the physical constraints of the server room/data center (existing remodel or new construction) and also considers the following aspects: - Centralized and secure location of facility - Centralized and secure location of facility - Physical security to include door access, biometric access, and cameras - Physical security to include door access, biometric access, and cameras - Physical construction considerations to withstand multiple types of threats - Physical construction considerations to withstand multiple types of threats - Determine and design for human needs in the event of an extended stay within a server room - Determine and design for human needs in the event of an extended stay within a server room - Prepare emergency protocol documentation. - Prepare emergency protocol documentation. - Prioritize what services will be restored, when and includes remote service redundancy. - Prioritize what services will be restored, when and includes remote service redundancy. - Emergency AC and power requirements of today's typical disaster-recovery server room. - Emergency AC and power requirements of today's typical disaster-recovery server room. - Network rack space needed for both servers and network equipment - Network rack space needed for both servers and network equipment - Typical specifications, based on U (rack) space for multiple servers - Typical specifications, based on U (rack) space for multiple servers - Throughput requirements for internal network speed - Throughput requirements for internal network speed - Internet capacity and any WAN or remote capacity - Internet capacity and any WAN or remote capacity - Fire suppression capabilities and system specifications - Fire suppression capabilities and system specifications - Remote dial out for security notification of intrusion or temperature fluctuations - Remote dial out for security notification of intrusion or temperature fluctuations

27 27 Project Data (Continued) Objectives for the Work: Objectives for the Work: Objective 1: Determine, design and implement server room development team, from all associated disciplines, designate project leadership, management, expectations and contractual issues. Objective 1: Determine, design and implement server room development team, from all associated disciplines, designate project leadership, management, expectations and contractual issues. Objective 2: Determine, design and implement ideal location for facility with respect to operational adjacencies, security, stability, and within a close proximity to emergency utility systems. Objective 2: Determine, design and implement ideal location for facility with respect to operational adjacencies, security, stability, and within a close proximity to emergency utility systems. Objective 3: Determine, design for and implement maximum human occupancy, extended stay needs, system restoration protocol, emergency communication protocol, and designate a responsible party for developing and administering the training of future occupants. Objective 3: Determine, design for and implement maximum human occupancy, extended stay needs, system restoration protocol, emergency communication protocol, and designate a responsible party for developing and administering the training of future occupants. Objective 4: Determine, design for and implement system specific needs with respect to equipment, racking, work space, storage, and network connections and speeds. Objective 4: Determine, design for and implement system specific needs with respect to equipment, racking, work space, storage, and network connections and speeds. Objective 5: Determine, design for and implement the facility build-out, required equipment electrical pulls, facility heat-gain and HVAC, personnel facilities plumbing & electric, fire detection and suppression systems, security systems. Objective 5: Determine, design for and implement the facility build-out, required equipment electrical pulls, facility heat-gain and HVAC, personnel facilities plumbing & electric, fire detection and suppression systems, security systems. Objective 6: Test facility instrumentation, load room, install equipment, test technical systems, perform a mock run of disaster recovery. Implement protocols. Objective 6: Test facility instrumentation, load room, install equipment, test technical systems, perform a mock run of disaster recovery. Implement protocols.

28 28 Project Data (Continued) Project Goal: Project Goal: This project should not be viewed as a single project to produce a server room/data center, but should instead be viewed as a process. The process involves taking input from potential customers based on a series of needs assessment criteria and producing a design for a server/room that fits their needs. The ultimate goal is to produce a reusable process for designing and building a server room/data center. This project should not be viewed as a single project to produce a server room/data center, but should instead be viewed as a process. The process involves taking input from potential customers based on a series of needs assessment criteria and producing a design for a server/room that fits their needs. The ultimate goal is to produce a reusable process for designing and building a server room/data center.

29 29 Project Status Team in place Project schedule – complete Flow/Layout – complete Design procedure - APQP in place Problem for 8-D Application identified and implemented ISO document control in place Project data complete

30 30 Chats and Threads The team has primarily used chats and discussion threads for team communication The team has primarily used chats and discussion threads for team communication Chats have been good for building consensus and taking team decisions Chats have been good for building consensus and taking team decisions Use of agenda has helped effectiveness of chats Use of agenda has helped effectiveness of chats Threaded discussions have been effective for sharing thoughts and ideas, and to solicit feedback Threaded discussions have been effective for sharing thoughts and ideas, and to solicit feedback The nice thing about these two tools is that both are self documenting The nice thing about these two tools is that both are self documenting No need to take meeting notes No need to take meeting notes

31 31 Summary and Conclusion Quality, price and schedule are extremely important for an organization to compete in the global market. Using LSSQTT and following a QMS, an organization could deliver high quality products just-in-time at a competitive price. LSSQTT Tool 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 focus on team building, technological systems leadership, technological innovation, foundational infrastructure, and robust design for new product development respectively. Starting from the start-up exercise, the project activities have helped the team to mature as a team to learn these tools and applications to experience challenges associated with team building, leadership, and innovation using the simulation project and, to follow a documentation framework using excel that confirms to ISO 9000 complete Phase II


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