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C ARBON Chanekqua Jackson -Tech 6 Ms.bishop. The atomic number for carbon is six(6].

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Presentation on theme: "C ARBON Chanekqua Jackson -Tech 6 Ms.bishop. The atomic number for carbon is six(6]."— Presentation transcript:

1 C ARBON Chanekqua Jackson -Tech 6 Ms.bishop

2 The atomic number for carbon is six(6].

3 The atomic mass for carbon is

4 The element symbol for carbon is ( C ].

5

6 H ISTORY OF CARBON The Element Carbon is defined as... A naturally abundant non-metallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely as graphite and diamond and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self- bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. One of the hardest (diamond) substances known to man. The most common uses of Carbon are in Fossil fuels - methane gas, Diamonds, Crude oil (petroleum), Radiocarbon dating, Smoke detectors, Graphite carbon used as charcoal for cooking & artwork, Gasoline, Kerosene, Carbon monoxide - dioxide and Carbon Fiber. Known since ancient times. it was discovered is but the name is unknown.diamond

7 A PPEARANCE OF CARBON Black or dark material found within a diamond's internal fracture planes can also be particles or crystallographic inclusions of graphite, ferropericlase, pyrrhotite and pentlandite. It is well known that Diamond is the hardest substance found in nature. Carbon is a nonmetal that can bond with itself and many other chemical elements, forming nearly ten million compounds. Carbon has the highest melting/sublimation point of the elements. The melting point of diamond is ~3550°C, with the sublimation point of carbon around 3800°C. Elemental carbon can take the form of one of the hardest substances (diamond) or one of the softest (graphite). nonmetalchemical elementscompounds

8 The physical state for carbon is a solid.

9 How is this element common because it is made up different varieties, Coal, soot, and diamonds are all nearly pure forms of carbon. Carbon occurs extensively in all living organisms as proteins, fats, carbohydrates (sugars and starches), and nucleic acids.


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