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Climate Action Plan Approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees October 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Climate Action Plan Approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees October 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Climate Action Plan Approved by the Ithaca College Board of Trustees October 2009

2 Former President Peggy Williams signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment on May 29, 2007.

3 We commit our institutions to taking the following steps in pursuit of climate neutrality: 1.Initiate the development of a comprehensive plan to achieve climate neutrality as soon as possible. (Presidents Climate Commitment task team formed) a.Within two months of signing this document, create institutional structures to guide the development and implementation of the plan. (Presidents Climate Commitment task team formed) Within one year of signing this document, complete a comprehensive inventory of all greenhouse gas emissions (including emissions from electricity, heating, commuting, and air travel) and update the inventory every other year thereafter. (GHGE inventory already completed for calendar years 2000 – 2007) b. Within one year of signing this document, complete a comprehensive inventory of all greenhouse gas emissions (including emissions from electricity, heating, commuting, and air travel) and update the inventory every other year thereafter. (GHGE inventory already completed for calendar years 2000 – 2007)

4 2007 GHG Emissions in metric tonnes CO 2 e 32,629 net Over four successive Spring independent student projects, students conducted the College’s comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions inventories for the calendar years ,691 net

5 Base Portfolio

6 32,629 metric tons of CO 2 equivalents (2007 GHGE)

7 32,629 metric tons of CO 2 equivalents (2007 GHGE) 32,629 MTCDE

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10 Scope 1 Direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that the institution owns or controls: - natural gas (space- and domestic-water heating) - fuel for College fleet vehicles - chemicals (refrigerants, fertilizers) 24 %

11 32,629 MTCDE

12 Scope 2 Indirect greenhouse gas emissions from the generation of purchased electricity consumed by equipment or operations owned or controlled by the institution 50 %

13 32,629 MTCDE

14 Scope 3 Indirect greenhouse gas emissions from all other sources that occur as a consequence of the institution’s activities that are not owned or operated by the institution: - student and staff commuting - business travel - solid waste generation 26 %

15 Scope 1 Direct GHG emissions from sources the institution owns or controls. - natural gas (space- and domestic-water heating) - fuel for fleet vehicles - chemicals (refrigerants, fertilizers) Scope 2 Indirect GHG emissions from the generation of purchased electricity consumed by equipment or operations owned or controlled by the institution. Scope 3 Indirect GHG emissions from all other sources that occur as a consequence of the institution’s activities but are not owned or operated by the institution. - commuting by faculty and staff and non-resident students - air travel for school business) - solid waste 74% 26%

16 32,629 MTCDE

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18 Metric Tonnes CO 2 e Ithaca College Greenhouse Gas Emissions History

19 c. Within two years of signing this document, develop an institutional action plan for becoming climate neutral, which will include: i. A target date for achieving climate neutrality as soon as possible. ii. Interim targets for goals and actions that will lead to climate neutrality. iii. Actions to make climate neutrality and sustainability a part of the curriculum and other educational experience for all students. iv. Actions to expand research or other efforts necessary to achieve climate neutrality. v. Mechanisms for tracking progress on goals and actions. Climate Action Plan Due: September 15, 2009

20 Climate Target and Timeline: 100% by 2050 minimum 2.5% per year reduction

21 Initiate two or more of the following tangible actions to reduce greenhouse gases while the more comprehensive plan is being developed. a.Establish a policy that all new campus construction will be built to at least the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard or equivalent a.Establish a policy that all new campus construction will be built to at least the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard or equivalent. (approved) b.b. Adopt an energy-efficient appliance purchasing policy requiring purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products in all areas for which such ratings exist. b.b. Adopt an energy-efficient appliance purchasing policy requiring purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products in all areas for which such ratings exist. (approved) c. Establish a policy of offsetting all greenhouse gas emissions generated by air travel paid for by our institution. c. Establish a policy of offsetting all greenhouse gas emissions generated by air travel paid for by our institution. (still pending) d. Encourage use of and provide access to public transportation for all faculty, staff, students and visitors at our institution d. Encourage use of and provide access to public transportation for all faculty, staff, students and visitors at our institution. (College supports 100% of bus fare cost for employees; 30% for students)

22 e. Within one year of signing this document, begin purchasing or producing at least 15% of our institution’s electricity consumption from renewable sources. e. Within one year of signing this document, begin purchasing or producing at least 15% of our institution’s electricity consumption from renewable sources. (we are purchasing 50% RECs for LEED Platinum buildings (Park Center and PRWC) and 70% for the A&E Center, but this does not meet 15% of institution’s demand). f. Establish a policy or a committee that supports climate and sustainability shareholder proposals at companies where our institution's endowment is invested. f. Establish a policy or a committee that supports climate and sustainability shareholder proposals at companies where our institution's endowment is invested. (will not be considered) g. Participate in the Waste Minimization component of the national RecycleMania competition, and adopt 3 or more associated measures to reduce waste. g. Participate in the Waste Minimization component of the national RecycleMania competition, and adopt 3 or more associated measures to reduce waste. (we participate annually in RecycleMania) 3. Make the action plan, inventory, and periodic progress reports publicly available by providing them to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) for posting and dissemination. 3. Make the action plan, inventory, and periodic progress reports publicly available by providing them to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) for posting and dissemination. (1 st and 2 nd year reports and all GHGE inventories posted)

23 “Business as Usual” Base Case

24 “Virtually all of our directly-financed activities resulting in GHG emissions will likely be covered either directly or indirectly under the legislation. Accordingly, Ithaca College will bear the cost of compliance either directly or in the form of higher costs from its energy and transportation supply chains.”

25 Ithaca College would still be subject to the financial risk of increased energy costs in the future, whether driven by market forces or regulatory requirements. Even if we take no action and continue to operate in a “Business As Usual” mode, the best estimate is that Ithaca College may be subject to future regulatory costs with a present value of $25,000,000.

26 Reference Case

27 Carbon offsets enable individuals and businesses to reduce the CO 2 emissions for which they are responsible by offsetting, reducing or displacing CO 2 emissions in another place.

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32 Climate Neutrality = “having no net GHG emissions, to be achieved by minimizing GHG emissions as much as possible and using carbon offsets or other measures to mitigate the remaining emissions.” Reference Cost = using financial instruments only (no direct actions to reduce emissions) to achieve our 2050 neutrality goal. Present value of Reference cost is estimated to be $15,600,000. Reference Case

33 Environment(+) avoids unnecessary waste Economy(+) low-cost & quick payback Social(-) need to proactively address safety & security issues Institution(+) visible evidence of institutional stewardship Lighting Upgrades … includes lamp, luminaire and control improvements to existing artificial lighting systems. Based on field findings during retro-commissioning work, specific retrofits will be packaged to yield a blended payback of 7 years. There will likely be additional modest CO 2 e reductions due to reduced cooling loads. Costs: initial investments to reduce lighting EUI to 1.0 watt/sf from 2.0 watt/sf will yield a 5-year payback. Secondary investments to get lighting EUI to 0.5 watt/sf will yield a 10-year payback. Thus, average payback will be 7 years. Benefits: (1) lighting accounts for 20% of electrical consumption campus-wide (chose low end of 20-30% range); (2) "actual" energy-use intensity (EUI) for lighting is 2.0 watt/sf; (3) after 40 years, target EUI for lighting is 0.5 watts per square foot of building space.

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35 reduction target Action begins in GasElecGHG Behavior Change Programs 20103%4%3% … to promote energy-conserving behaviors by faculty, staff & students, complementing transport actions (p. 19) Meter & Retro-Commission 20102%12%7% … finish installing meters, then have the energy manager monitor & dispatch staff to assure systems are operating properly (p. 18) Space Management 20111% … more-effectively using existing spaces, and shutting down or turning-back spaces that are not needed (p. 18) Controls Upgrades % 14% … will allow us to better monitor system performance and balance systems to space management needs (p. 19) Envelope Upgrades 20163%0%2% … to reduce heat gains/losses & infiltration, and improve thermal comfort for occupants. Major Plant Upgrades %10%14% … either replace distributed existing boilers/chillers or use regional/central plants & improved distribution piping (p. 19) Solar Domestic Hot Water 20165%-3% … will focus on residential and dining halls, where hot water consumption is greatest (p. 21) Appliance Efficiency Standards %2% … will improve the efficiency of plug loads, and eventually be required for personal appliances as well (p. 17) Lighting Upgrades %8% … to improve efficiency, control and have more uniform equipment specifications (p. 17)

36 electricity natural gas employee commuting travel

37 Years 1-5 appliance efficiency standards – 3%; 2% controls upgrade – 20%; 10% energy management/RCx– 12%; 6% space management – 1%; 0.25% behavior – 4%; 2% reuse/recycle– 30%; 1% behavior– 5%; 0% behavior– 3%; 1% controls upgrade– 20%; 4% energy mgmt/RCx– 2%; 0% space mgmt– 1%; 0% employee commuting natural gas travel electricity natural gas employee commuting travel electricity

38 First Five Years ( ) complete the metering of all campus buildings & major energy-using systems upgrade controls for lighting and HVAC systems expand the data inventory of our energy-using systems retain an energy manager retro-commission all existing facilities develop performance-driven facility design guidelines feasibility of central plant option develop energy- and space-use intensity guidelines for construction/renovations develop building envelope renovation guidelines standardize energy-using systems and equipment develop program and policy changes that support emissions-reducing behaviors demonstration installation of solar domestic water heating investigate third-party financing of renewable energy technologies (PV/wind) hire a transportation coordinator to establish commuter reduction goals

39 What have we accomplished so far? Retained an Energy Manager – Michelle Jones hired summer 2010 Renegotiated energy contracts, saving thousands of dollars Initiated 10% Energy Campaign to reduce building energy consumption campus-wide an average of 10% Continue upgrading HVAC and lighting with energy-efficient technologies Re-lamping projects, many with LED technology Comprehensive dining energy and water conservation project Variable-speed drives on HVAC system motors Contracted with Clough-Harbor Associates (CHA) to conduct energy audit and retro-commissioning study of all campus buildings Install controls on energy systems and implement set-backs CHA will upgrade and complete energy sub-meter installations CHA will also study the feasibility of a central utility plant or regional plants that might eventually be fueled with biofuels

40 Updated the Comprehensive Environmental Policy: Departments shall specify and purchase Energy Star –certified energy-efficient products, where applicable All new facilities and major renovations shall incorporate sustainable practices to the degree feasible and shall strive, at a minimum, to meet the equivalent of a LEED Silver rating in their design. Project management teams are encouraged to meet higher LEED rating levels whenever possible Expanded College support for alternative transportation for commuting Extended free TCAT usage to part-time staff, Sodexo employees, and to Challenge consumers working on our campus Underwrite Ithaca Carshare ridership costs for students and staff Underwrite participation in VPSI van pool program Provide free bus passes to commuters served by Tioga Transit and Chemung Transit systems Collaborated in the development of Zimride Tompkins, community-wide rideshare system (currently NYSERDA funded) What have we accomplished so far?

41 Instituted energy- and water-conserving practices campus-wide All ITS computers/printers on the technology renewal program meet EPEAT and Energy Star standards Facilities grounds has adopted alternative landscape practices in some areas, reducing need for mowing and irrigation Implementing plans to make the campus fleet more fuel-efficient “Right-sizing” campus vehicle fleet smaller, more fuel-efficient replacement vehicles purchased reducing the need for fleet vehicles through consolidation of services and deliveries specifying “best in class” fuel-efficient vehicles for replacements specifying hybrid technology vehicles where appropriate Conducted awareness-raising campaigns to solicit adoption of resource-conserving behavior changes What have we accomplished so far?

42 Saving one kWh of electricity = 0.86 pounds of CO 2 Not combusting one therm of natural gas = pounds of CO 2 Conserving one gallon of gasoline = 19.6 pounds of CO 2 Conserving one gallon of diesel fuel = 22.4 pounds of CO 2 Composting one ton of food waste = 2 TONS of CO 2 Recycling one ton of paper = 1 TON of CO 2 What difference can members of the campus community make? Traveling one fewer commercial air passenger mile = 0.82 pounds of CO 2 Using one less gallon of hot water = 0.18 pounds of CO 2 Making resource conserving choices can have a profound impact!

43 First Five Years ( ) complete the metering of all campus buildings & major energy-using systems IN PROGRESS upgrade controls for lighting and HVAC systems IN PROGRESS expand the data inventory of our energy-using systems IN PROGRESS retain an energy manager DONE retro-commission all existing facilities IN PROGRESS develop performance-driven facility design guidelines PENDING ACTION feasibility of central plant option STUDY IN PROGRESS develop energy- and space-use intensity guidelines for construction/renovations PENDING develop building envelope renovation guidelines PENDING ACTION standardize energy-using systems and equipment PENDING ACTION develop program and policy changes to support emissions-reducing behaviors IN PROGRESS demonstration installation of solar domestic water heating PENDING ACTION investigate third-party financing of renewable energy technologies (PV/wind) PENDING hire a transportation coordinator to establish commuter reduction goals PENDING ACTION

44 Some “success stories” Dining energy conservation project Campus Center Kitchen 1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011: 9,258 therms of natural gas 1/1/2010 – 12/31/2010: 11,760 therms of natural gas Difference in natural gas use from 2010 to 2011: 21.28% reduction Facilities maintenance equipment upgrades and replacements Phillips Hall Motors (variable speed drives installed on motors) 2/1/2011 – 12/31/2011: 1,716,779 kWh 2/1/2010 – 12/31/2010: 1,865,037 kWh Difference in electricity use from 2010 to 2011: 7.95% reduction Science Building (re-lamping, VSDs and laboratory hood system) 1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011: 2,493,385 kWh 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006: 2,919,285 kWh 14.59% reduction 1/1/2011 – 12/31/2011: 158,385 therms 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006: 205,726 therms 23.01% reduction Gannett Center (re-lamping project) 8/31/2007 – 7/31/2008:1,066,589 kWh 8/31/2005 – 7/31/2006: 1,843,319 kWh Difference in electricity use from 2006 to 2008: 72.82% reduction

45 What is “in the works”… Continue dining energy conservation project replace equipment with energy-efficient models continue to train employees to implement energy-conserving practices institute comprehensive preventive maintenance program develop “business case” scenarios for major building system upgrades Approved capital projects Whalen Center chiller replacement Campus Center boiler replacement Towers boiler replacement Emerson Hall window replacement Roof replacement on Center for Natural Sciences Set-aside funding for energy conservation projects Hill Center project (new windows, insulation) Continue facilities maintenance equipment upgrades and replacements replace equipment with energy-efficient models institute comprehensive preventive maintenance program

46 Base Portfolio Wedge Chart

47 Finishing Portfolio Wedge Chart Central Utility Plant

48 Years 1-5 Years 6-15 lighting upgrade – 15%; 8% appliance efficiency standards – 3%; 2% controls upgrade – 20%; 10% energy management/RCx– 12%; 6% space management – 1%; 0.25% behavior – 4%; 2% GeoExchange – 10%; 5% reuse/recycle– 30%; 1% behavior– 5%; 0% behavior– 20%; 0% behavior– 15%; 2% GeoExchange – 40%; 9% behavior– 3%; 1% controls upgrade– 20%; 4% energy mgmt/RCx– 2%; 0% space mgmt– 1%; 0% env systems upgrades– 8%; 2% better mpg– 25%; 1% fuel switch– 25%; 1% employee commuting natural gas travel electricity natural gas employee commuting travel electricity

49 Next Ten Years ( ) replace aging HVAC plant in buildings install solar domestic water-heating systems for residential and dining facilities install up to two commercial-scale wind turbines on campus assure that best practices in energy efficiency are followed procure alternative-fuel vehicles and develop supportive infrastructure

50 Years 1-5 Years 6-15 Years 16+ lighting upgrade – 15%; 8% appliance efficiency standards – 3%; 2% controls upgrade – 20%; 10% energy management/RCx– 12%; 6% space management – 1%; 0.25% behavior – 4%; 2% solar DHW – 6%; 1% GeoExchange – 10%; 5% utility footprint– 35%; 18% reuse/recycle– 30%; 1% behavior– 5%; 0% behavior– 20%; 0% behavior– 15%; 2% GeoExchange – 40%; 9% behavior– 3%; 1% controls upgrade– 20%; 4% energy mgmt/RCx– 2%; 0% space mgmt– 1%; 0% env systems upgrades– 8%; 2% better mpg– 25%; 1% fuel switch– 25%; 1% electricity natural gas employee commuting travel natural gas employee commuting electricity

51 Final Twenty-Five Years ( ) install photovoltaic systems assure that best practices in energy efficiency are followed procure alternative-fuel vehicles and develop supportive infrastructure ???

52 Action Abatement Curve

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54 Metric Tonnes CO 2 e Ithaca College Greenhouse Gas Emissions History

55 Early projections for 2011 for purchased electricity and stationary combustion (natural gas) are for these emissions to greatly increase due to A&E. Gross greenhouse gas emissions by source

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57 Increase our purchase of Renewable Energy Credits 70% for A&E Center 50% for Peggy R. Williams Center 50% for Park Center for Business and Sustainable Enterpr ise Purchase “green power” through our purchased electricity contract Invest in the development of the Black Oak Wind Farm in Enfield and make a firm, long-term commitment to purchase wind power Increase financial investment in energy efficiency and energy conservation measures in campus buildings  prioritize items on the Sightlines deferred maintenance list that have energy- or water-saving potential  add controls on existing systems (occupancy sensors, etc.)  be prepared to implement recommendations of the CHA retro-commissioning/ energy audit study  increase attention to water-conserving technologies  prioritize replacement of old windows and doors and improve insulation of existing buildings Consider purchasing “carbon offsets” for stationary combustion (heating) Develop a central utility plant that could use biofuels for heating

58 Create internal workplace policies to discourage needless energy consumption with consequences for non-compliance Increase support for student TCAT passes Implement a policy to allow voluntary purchase of “carbon offsets” for institutional air travel and commuting Implement a MANDATORY policy to purchase “carbon offsets” for institutional air travel Institute parking fees for faculty/staff to encourage use of alternative transportation programs already offered Implement a policy to allow voluntary purchase of “carbon offsets” for student air travel and commuting Conduct a comprehensive landscape study of the campus, to identify opportunities to further reduce the need for regular mowing, irrigation, maintenance, fertilization, herbicides and pesticides application through development of alternative planting areas

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