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LESSON STRUCTURE "TITLE" Grades Subjects Objectives One to three Objectives Binary Paideia Chart Key terms Background One to Five paragraphs Procedures.

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Presentation on theme: "LESSON STRUCTURE "TITLE" Grades Subjects Objectives One to three Objectives Binary Paideia Chart Key terms Background One to Five paragraphs Procedures."— Presentation transcript:

1 LESSON STRUCTURE "TITLE" Grades Subjects Objectives One to three Objectives Binary Paideia Chart Key terms Background One to Five paragraphs Procedures Previous night’s homework to give the students a common base of knowledge. Day of Lesson Procedure  Do Now – to get them started as soon as they come into class.  Review Binary Paideia with students.  Try to include some video clips from Weblessons, or some web sites, or some primary excerpts, or a combination of all three. Homework Assessment Extension Resources Tables, charts, maps, etc.

2 Lesson Structure A LEARNING EXPERIENCE FOR TEACHERS “John Fenwick & Salem, NJ” As an Example

3 Grades United States History World History Language Arts, Reading, Math, etc.

4 Time Required? At least one 90-minute period or two 45-minute periods

5 Must be New Jersey standards based Take your topic, then GO TO THE STANDARDS FIRST

6 LOOK TO YOUR C.P.I.s Curriculum Progress Indicators

7 Create the Assessment from the CPI th grade Discuss the political and philosophical origins of the United States Constitution and its implementation in the 1790s th grade Compare and contrast the major philosophical and historical influences on the development of the Constitution (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address (1796), Locke’s Second Treatise, the ideas of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and William Paterson).

8 NJ State Assessment writers (fellow teachers) structure assessment guidelines that will have students demonstrate their mastery of the CPI.

9 Test Creating companies, like ETS, hire teachers to write the questions. Teachers are trained to write the questions directly from the CPIs ETS then reviews the questions and answers, against the CPIs. Questions are sent to the State of NJ for review.

10 The State of NJ then sends the questions back to the Assessment committee of teachers. The committee matches every question with the CPIs. They must Ok the question, reject the question, or send it back for modification. Questions also go before a Sensitivity Committee.

11 The questions are then field tested.

12 If you create lessons from the CPIs, you’ll teach to the standards That is the law! You’ll be prepared for assessments

13 If you rely on the text book, you are not teaching to the Standards. You will not be prepared!

14 Then think of creating an Assessment In three separate paragraphs, students will show, the ability to: 1.Identify John Fenwick’s motivation to leave England and settle in West Jersey 2.Explain the issues that faced John Fenwick as he built his settlement in West Jersey 3.Trace the ownership of West Jersey from Lord Berkley to William Penn

15 From the Assessment, write your Objectives The Objectives and Assessments must agree. They must meet the national benchmarks and local benchmarks

16 Students will be able to: 1.identify John Fenwick’s motivation to leave England and settle in West Jersey. 2.explain the issues that faced John Fenwick as he built his settlement in West Jersey. 3.trace the ownership of West Jersey from Lord Berkley to William Penn.

17 OBJECTIVES Students will be able to: 1.identify John Fenwick’s motivation to leave England and settle in West Jersey. 2.explain the issues that faced John Fenwick as he built his settlement in West Jersey. 3.trace the ownership of West Jersey from Lord Berkley to William Penn. ASSESSMENTS In three separate paragraphs, students will show, the ability to: 1.Identify John Fenwick’s motivation to leave England and settle in West Jersey 2.Explain the issues that faced John Fenwick as he built his settlement in West Jersey 3.Trace the ownership of West Jersey from Lord Berkley to William Penn

18 Binary Paideia Chart England in 1676 Time Period West Jersey in 1676 Near Absolute Monarchy Politeia/Regime Proprietary Colony, Representative Republic Royalty & Aristocrats- Bishops Politeuma/Ruling Proprietor, Citizens Anglican Church, Magna Carta Paideia/What makes a society what it is West Jersey Charter, 1676, Society of Friends LoyaltyVirtue/ he Highest Moral Excellence Reflection to find the “Inner Light”

19 Key Terms, Type of Word, & DEFINITIONS

20 HISTORICAL BACKGROUND For Students and/or for Teacher Depending on level Historical Narrative H istory!! You get to research and write H istory!!

21 US DoE CONTENT

22 Academic Achievement in American History Importance of Background Knowledge –Academic BK is linked to achievement –More ABK equals higher income –Higher ABK equals higher IQ –Low SES students have lower ABK –ABK can be increased in all students

23 Academic Achievement in American History (continued) How do we increase ABK? –1 with our natural ability to store and process information academically oriented experiences –2 with our encounters with academically oriented experiences –3 motivation to learn and time on task

24 Academic Achievement in American History (continued) The interaction among those factors will influence Academic Background Knowledge Thus a student with lower skill and more academic experience can outperform a learner with higher skill and limited academic related experiences This is why the wealthy like private schools

25 How ABK is Stored for Use Memory is enhanced with repeated practice It takes about four exposures of new knowledge to integrate into Memory These separate exposures should be no more than two days apart

26 Conklin, PhD., Jack (2006) John Witherspoon Liberty Fellowship, Lakewood, NJ. –Burns, R. C. (2001) Curriculum renewal: curriculum mapping. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. –Marzano, R. J. (2004) Building Background Knowledge for Academic Success. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. –Marzano, R. J. (2003) What works in schools: Translating research into action. ASCD, Alexandria, VA. –Woyshner, C. C. (2003) Social Studies: a chapter of the curriculum handbook. ASCD, Alexandria, VA.

27 Lesson Procedure Must have Previous Night’s Homework, with an exercise for accountability to establish a common starting point!

28 Day of the Lesson Procedure to bring students from the OBJECTIVES to the ASSESSMENT

29 What Is It? Backward Design is a process of lesson planning created by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe and introduced in Understanding by Design (1998). This lesson design process concentrates on developing the lesson in a different order than in traditional lesson planning.

30 Begin with the END in mind! Why?

31 “A ship with no port of destination, knows no favorable wind.” Anonymous

32 Common Planning Mistakes Cute activities that don’t really go anywhere or are too loosely connected to the objective Marching through the textbooks Both are symptomatic of a lack of intellectual focus on targeted goals

33 How Is It Different? Traditional Table of Contents Activities Assessments Backward Design Goals & objectives Assessments Activities

34 Shift Your Focus from Teaching to Learning From: “Teaching” for content mastery Discrete skills, out of context, on neat-and- clean exercises, with simple answers Linear coverage of all content, as if everything is equal and learnable by one exposure Textbook as syllabus To: “Learning” how to USE content effectively Draw upon many skills, in realistic contexts via complex tasks and problems Recursive curriculum with clear priorities and many chances to understand Textbook as a resource, in support of explicit learning goals

35 Shift your Perspective! It’s NOT what I teach but how do I get it learned It’s NOT the input but the yield It’s NOT the syllabus but the results

36 Identify desired results. Determine acceptable evidence. Plan learning experiences and instruction. Wiggins, G & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

37 What is important for students to be able to do, know, or perform? What enduring understandings are needed?enduring understandings What state, national, and district standards need to be met? What are the essential questions?essential questions Identify Desired Results

38 Constantly Gather Evidence to Check for Understanding

39 HOMEWORK FOR ACCOUNTABILITY

40 EXTENSIONS

41 Resources Worksheets and Handouts

42 SOURCES Cite your sources Books, Articles, and Links

43 What would be your greatest challenge when researching a topic, e.g. The Navigation Acts? What is your greatest challenge when writing an historical narrative? What is you greatest challenge when writing a substantive lesson?

44 Solution to overcoming challenge #1 Solution to overcoming challenge #2 Solution to overcoming challenge #3

45 We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. --That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed

46 Write, why these words could be considered the most important words in human history. What do they mean? Or, are they just meaningless war propaganda. What were their purpose? Or, are they over-hyped rhetoric used to delude people into complying the wishes of the national elite? Explain


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