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Www.aids2014.org Hopefulness among People living with HIV fosters positive affects and cognitions that support adaptive coping in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.aids2014.org Hopefulness among People living with HIV fosters positive affects and cognitions that support adaptive coping in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hopefulness among People living with HIV fosters positive affects and cognitions that support adaptive coping in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania H. Siril & S. Kaaya: Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, M.C.S. Fawzi: Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA J. Kilewo: Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Department of Epidemiology J. Todd: National Research institute, Mwanza W. Monique N. & Ware: Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Population, USA WEPDD0120

2 Background Hopefulness is reported to increase coping with chronic illnesses but understudied and underutilized in HIV care Goal: to understand the meaning of hope as perceived by PLH and potential role of hope in promoting good health, treatment outcomes and quality of life from the perspective of PLH WEPDD0120

3 Methods Multi-site 10 FGD, 8 IDI with 82 PLH In-depth interviews done with PLH who had depressive symptoms Used an interview guide exploring meaning, dimensions, and outcomes of hopefulness among PLH Study location: Dar es Salaam, Tanzania in April to June 2012 Eligibility: HIV infected, ≥18 years, on ART Thematic analysis of narrative data was performed using grounded theory WEPDD0120

4 Results Three dimensions of hope: cognitive change, positive emotions, positive actions to normalize life after HIV diagnosis. Step1:Knowing HIV diagnosis not a death sentence & ART were the first steps! “I wasn’t living anymore since I knew of my HIV even though I was walking around. Life was meaningless to me, I wasn’t able to sleep or do my routine work. But afterwards I was told that there is medicine (ART) that can treat me. I became happy again because I won’t die as I thought. that is how I got hope” (FGD participant woman ≥35 yr Step 2 &3: Positive emotions, active engagement in health seeking behaviors “I was not sure of continuing with my life anymore. Mmmh I mean when this problem of (HIV) came my way, I lost all my inner strength, but a nurse assured us that, the treatment is available. Suddenly I knew this is not the end of my life! I can be treated… huh! And so it gave me much joy and happiness that caused my heart [to] gain strength again.. So I came to this hospital and that is where I was started [on] treatment (ART).” (FGD participant / man between the ages of years). WEPDD0120

5 Conclusion Although our study involved a sub group of PLH who are on ART in urban areas and lacks PLH not taking ART or living in rural areas, the findings point to a possibility of positive benefits of promoting aspects of care which increase hope, among PLH attending ART care programs and complement ART on improving the quality of lives for PLH. WEPDD0120


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