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1 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH learning research and development center institute for learning Using the Content-Focused.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH learning research and development center institute for learning Using the Content-Focused."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH learning research and development center institute for learning Using the Content-Focused Coaching  Model to Support Early Childhood Literacy and Language Development Discussing the Rigorous Comprehension Lesson Experience

2 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 2 Becoming a Learning Community Means That We: Use each other’s expertise Remain open to new ideas and to growing our thinking and practice Share responsibility for the learning of all our members Use our agreed upon norms of interaction

3 3 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 3 Norms Individually, make a list of the norms that should guide our time together and govern our conversation when discussing texts, our own writing, student work, etc. (about 3 minutes) Talk with a partner about your ideas and combine them into a list, from most to least important. Keep the list of norms we agree to in your binder.

4 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 4 The Role of the Facilitator To monitor the discussion so all participants are: –are heard, –have opportunities to participate, and –focus on the topic to maintain a productive discussion To assist the connection making efforts of individuals as they link theory with practice To prompt participants to make connections to the text and/or video To solicit agreement and/or encourage counter suggestions

5 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 5 The Role of the Recorder To jot down relevant ideas from group members in their own words To categorize ideas with the help of the group To decide with the group which ideas to share with the larger group

6 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 6 Intended Learning To become familiar with the Early Childhood Text Discussion Teaching and Learning Feedback Tool To advance our skills in supporting teacher practice by considering the nuances of feedback and reflection

7 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 7 Early Childhood Text Discussion Teaching and Learning Feedback Tool

8 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 8 The Role of Feedback and Reflection in Providing Instruction to Advance Student Learning

9 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 9 Link to Research Both specific feedback and guided self-reflection have been shown to be effective in such diverse performance skills as teaching algebra and aircraft maintenance. (Aleven & Koedinger, 2002; Lesgold, Lajoie, Bunzo and Eggan, 1992; Lesgold & Nahemow, 2001)

10 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 10 Intended Learning To clarify the distinctions between “feedback” and “reflection.” To understand the role of feedback and reflection in your work with teachers. To consider how the tools and processes of Content-Focused Coaching ® assist this work.

11 11 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 11 Task Directions: Individually, review your notes from your advance reading of the article Teacher Leadership as Classroom Support: The Challenges of Scale and Feedback in Mathematics and Science Education Reform, by Lord, Cress, and Miller. With your table group, create a chart to define “feedback” (both “hard” and “soft”) and “reflection”. Use your notes and the article to assist you. Be prepared to share your chart with the whole group.

12 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 12 What is feedback? The giving of information to a person about their behavior or ideas in a situation. Hard and soft feedback are distinguished by the nature of the information and the way it is provided. Hard feedback: Direct Challenge teacher’s preferred, customary practice Focus on student learning and instructional practice Soft feedback: Indirect Avoid challenging practice Focus on “nice” relationship

13 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 13 What is feedback? Mistaken Notions Hard feedback Evaluative, directive, offensive Candid Critical, meaning “judge severely, find fault” Outside expert Focus on teacher deficiencies Soft feedback Polite, suggestive, diplomatic, friendly Avoids some issues Keeps things smooth Collegial partner Focus on teacher strength

14 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 14 What is feedback? In Reality Hard feedback - should be “substantive feedback” Respectful (of feelings and experience) Productive Collegial, co-accountable Critical (meaning “careful, exact”) Connected to mutual expectations (i.e., criteria) Evidence-based Focus on student learning Soft feedback – is often “meaningless feedback” Disrespectful, not really engaging the other person Superficial Perfunctory Sharing impressions Focus on teacher improvement

15 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 15 What is feedback? Meaningless SubstantiveInsensitive Feedback Feedback Feedback

16 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 16 What is Reflection? The regular, frequent and systematic habit of thinking through a situation after the fact, by the person(s) in the situation in terms of a set of expectations or criteria whether those criteria were met why or why not what to do next as a result

17 17 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 17 Task Directions continued: As a whole group, we will use your charted definitions and notes from your advance reading and response to the guiding questions to help us discuss the following: –What is the purpose of feedback? Of reflection? –What is the relationship between feedback and reflection? –How do feedback and reflection help you and the person you are conferencing with achieve your goals? –How can the POL and Core Issues assist you in giving feedback or prompting reflection in your work with others (i.e. teachers, coaches)? –How might you decide when to use feedback or prompt reflection?

18 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 18 What is the Purpose of Feedback? To assist a teacher by providing information or perspective he/she would not have otherwise

19 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 19 What is the Purpose of Reflection? To assist oneself by recognizing and making use of lessons learned from experience with the goal of continuous improvement

20 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 20 What is the Relationship between Feedback and Reflection? Both intend to be helpful. Feedback considers a situation from the outside. Reflection considers a situation from the inside.

21 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 21 How Do Feedback and Reflection Help You and the Teacher Achieve Your Goals? They provide as complete a picture as possible of a situation. They take advantage of the experience and thinking of both parties. They assist a teacher to move from assisted performance to independent practice.

22 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 22 How Do the Principles of Learning and Core Issues Assist You in Giving Feedback or Prompting Reflection? They provide frameworks for the content of the conversations and the nature of the relationship. They establish clear expectations and boundaries for the mutual work.

23 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 23 How Might You Decide When to Use Feedback or Prompt Reflection? CFC establishes providing direct assistance (feedback) and eliciting information (reflection) as the two central “moves” of a coach or anyone supporting another’s learning and practice. It should be mutually understood that both parties have a responsibility to engage in reflection and offer feedback in every interaction.

24 24 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 24 Task Directions continued: We will watch a video example of a CFC post- conference. Work with a partner to find instances in the transcript of feedback and prompting reflection. Be prepared to share an example with the whole group.

25 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Video Example Context Teacher, Sharon Arena-Zanghi Coach, Daryl Mazza Coach Coordinator, Sandy Rainone

26 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 26

27 27 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 27 Summary Points: Feedback: Starting at lines 20 – “I thought maybe if we could try…” 27 – “That’s it. And then you could…” 64 – “It’s funny, you bringing up Anthony….” 85 – “Ranier. I would try him on another….” 92 – “So this might be appropriate….” 98 – “That would be great….” 102 – “And find the word that they need….” Reflection: Starting at lines 5 – “Okay. I noticed something….” 40 – “You’re welcome. And I also, I was noticing….” 52 – “They both seem to be….” 57 – “I’m curious. When you move the group….”

28 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 28 Summary Points: Reasons for ‘providing feedback’: A teacher may not know what s/he does not know, so cannot adequately reflect on his/her performance. Effective professional development on this strategy or approach has been adequately provided; it is the focus of a school’s improvement plan; the teacher has had time to practice, ask questions and is at the application stage of learning. A teacher and coach have explicitly identified something concrete to work on, e.g., establishing clear expectations for students regarding the desired outcome of the lesson/unit, and the teacher has requested “feedback” on progress on this issue.

29 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 29 Summary Points: Reasons for ‘providing feedback’: Criteria for successful implementation of the teaching strategy or approach have been articulated and discussed and the teacher has had an opportunity to co-construct her understanding of the criteria for success in terms of student learning as well as teacher performance. It is the next step needed on the continuum to self- reflection. It is always helpful to have another’s perspective.

30 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 30 Summary Points: Reasons for “prompting reflection” The principal, coach etc. will not always be there to give a teacher feedback. Ultimately, we want to build the motivation and skill for self- reflection and independent use of specific habits of thinking, lesson planning, and enactment. The teacher can articulate exactly what s/he is attempting to improve as well as the criteria for successful implementation, i.e., the teacher can ‘see’ her own performance.

31 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 31 Factors Influencing Feedback and Reflection Mutually understood criteria Nature and longevity of relationship Age differences Gender differences Building seniority Actual or perceived power differences

32 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 32 Closing A goal for every role we play: “…to try things out for [ourselves] and thus gain ownership of desired reforms.” Lord, Cress, and Miller, (2003). Teacher Leadership as Classroom Support: The Challenges of Scale and Feedback in Mathematics and Science Education Reform, p. 9

33 Learning Research and Development Center © 2013 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 33 Reflecting on Today’s Learning How would you explain to a colleague the differences between feedback and reflection? What was new learning for you today about feedback and reflection? What will be challenging for you in using these responses most effectively?


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