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Pebble in the Pond: Beginning A Dialogue on Science & Religion.

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Presentation on theme: "Pebble in the Pond: Beginning A Dialogue on Science & Religion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Pebble in the Pond: Beginning A Dialogue on Science & Religion

2 Four Contenders in the Fight over the Relationship between Science & Christianity

3 Conflict

4 “So, will science and religion find common ground, or at least agree to divide the fundamentals into mutually exclusive domains? A great many well- meaning scholars believe that such rapprochement is both possible and desirable. A few disagree, and I am one of them.” Prof. Edward O. Wilson “So, will science and religion find common ground, or at least agree to divide the fundamentals into mutually exclusive domains? A great many well- meaning scholars believe that such rapprochement is both possible and desirable. A few disagree, and I am one of them.” Prof. Edward O. Wilson

5 Independent

6 “The proper relationship between science and religion [is] NOMA, or non-overlapping magisteria. These two domains hold equal worth and necessary status for any complete human life. They remain logically distinct and fully separate in styles of inquiry.” Stephen Jay Gould from Rocks of Ages, p “The proper relationship between science and religion [is] NOMA, or non-overlapping magisteria. These two domains hold equal worth and necessary status for any complete human life. They remain logically distinct and fully separate in styles of inquiry.” Stephen Jay Gould from Rocks of Ages, p

7 Dialogue

8 “Dialogue portrays more constructive relationships between science and religion… Dialogue may arise from considering the presuppositions of the scientific enterprise, or from exploring similarities between the methods of science and those of religion, or from analyzing concepts in one field that are analogous to those in the other.” Ian G. Barbour from When Science Meets Religion, p. 23 “Dialogue portrays more constructive relationships between science and religion… Dialogue may arise from considering the presuppositions of the scientific enterprise, or from exploring similarities between the methods of science and those of religion, or from analyzing concepts in one field that are analogous to those in the other.” Ian G. Barbour from When Science Meets Religion, p. 23

9 Integrated

10 “Many people don’t realize that science basically involves assumptions and faith. But nothing is absolutely proved. Wonderful things in both science and religion come from our efforts based on observations, thoughtful assumptions, faith and logic.” Charles Townes as quoted in USA Today, 3/10/2005 “Many people don’t realize that science basically involves assumptions and faith. But nothing is absolutely proved. Wonderful things in both science and religion come from our efforts based on observations, thoughtful assumptions, faith and logic.” Charles Townes as quoted in USA Today, 3/10/2005

11 ScienceTheology

12 What KIND of Discussion IS This? What KIND of Discussion IS This?

13 “If the universe were just electrons and selfish genes, meaningless tragedies like the crashing of a bus are exactly what we should expect, along with equally meaningless good fortune. Such a universe would be neither evil nor good in intention. In a universe of blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won’t find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice.”

14 “Whatever this bleak judgement is, it is clearly not a conclusion of science alone. It was not his knowledge of genetics that enabled Richard Dawkins to make this pronounce- ment. Rather, it represents his metaphysical judgement on the significance of the scientific story which is presented to us.” Belief in God in an Age of Science, by John Polkinghorne, p. 12 “Whatever this bleak judgement is, it is clearly not a conclusion of science alone. It was not his knowledge of genetics that enabled Richard Dawkins to make this pronounce- ment. Rather, it represents his metaphysical judgement on the significance of the scientific story which is presented to us.” Belief in God in an Age of Science, by John Polkinghorne, p. 12

15 “If the universe were just electrons and selfish genes, meaningless tragedies like the crashing of a bus are exactly what we should expect, along with equally meaningless good fortune. Such a universe would be neither evil nor good in intention. In a universe of blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won’t find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice.”

16

17 “In freeing our minds from our imagined demigod bondage, even at the price of humility, Darwin turned our attention to the astounding power of the natural creative process and the magnificence of its products: ‘There is grandeur in this view of life.’” Edward O. Wilson again “In freeing our minds from our imagined demigod bondage, even at the price of humility, Darwin turned our attention to the astounding power of the natural creative process and the magnificence of its products: ‘There is grandeur in this view of life.’” Edward O. Wilson again

18 “In freeing our minds from our imagined demigod bondage, even at the price of humility, Darwin turned our attention to the astounding power of the natural creative process and the magnificence of its products: ‘There is grandeur in this view of life.’” Edward O. Wilson again “In freeing our minds from our imagined demigod bondage, even at the price of humility, Darwin turned our attention to the astounding power of the natural creative process and the magnificence of its products: ‘There is grandeur in this view of life.’” Edward O. Wilson again

19 “Intelligent design is the scientific theory that observes the natural world and concludes that the diversity and complexity of life on Earth can only be rationally explained by positing a thinking mind behind it all…

20 “Intelligent design is the scientific theory that observes the natural world and concludes that the diversity and complexity of life on Earth can only be rationally explained by positing a thinking mind behind it all… Complicated biological things ‘give the appearance of being designed for a purpose’ because they were designed for a purpose. This is a possibility that Dawkins and other evolutionists cannot admit-not for scientific reasons-but for philosophical and religious reasons.

21 “Intelligent design is the scientific theory that observes the natural world and concludes that the diversity and complexity of life on Earth can only be rationally explained by positing a thinking mind behind it all… Complicated biological things ‘give the appearance of being designed for a purpose’ because they were designed for a purpose. This is a possibility that Dawkins and other evolutionists cannot admit-not for scientific reasons-but for philosophical and religious reasons. Evolution and intelligent design represent two radically different world-views.” James Tonkowich in By Faith magazine, issue 7 “Intelligent design is the scientific theory that observes the natural world and concludes that the diversity and complexity of life on Earth can only be rationally explained by positing a thinking mind behind it all… Complicated biological things ‘give the appearance of being designed for a purpose’ because they were designed for a purpose. This is a possibility that Dawkins and other evolutionists cannot admit-not for scientific reasons-but for philosophical and religious reasons. Evolution and intelligent design represent two radically different world-views.” James Tonkowich in By Faith magazine, issue 7

22 NEXT TIME How can we carry on this Dialogue / Integration? NEXT TIME How can we carry on this Dialogue / Integration?


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