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Monday President’s Day – No School! This Week: Return Key Passage Analysis and Discuss Critical Questions Theme and Key Passages.

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Presentation on theme: "Monday President’s Day – No School! This Week: Return Key Passage Analysis and Discuss Critical Questions Theme and Key Passages."— Presentation transcript:

1 Monday President’s Day – No School! This Week: Return Key Passage Analysis and Discuss Critical Questions Theme and Key Passages

2 Hook, Housekeeping, & Homework Tuesday Grab a copy of The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass. Did you turn in your The Great Debaters viewing guide last week? Do so now if you did not.

3 Past, Present, Future Tuesday The Great Debaters Counselors in Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass Key Passage Review Critical Questions Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass Theme & Key Passages

4 Activity: Develop & Apply 2 Reading for All Purposes: Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Purpose: to review the early circumstances of Frederick Douglass’ life and how they may have shaped his future by reviewing events Tasks: 1.Working with a partner, give chapter titles/names to Chapters Use the details, the circumstances that positively propel him into his future and circumstances that hinder him or hold him back, from the chapter to justify each creative title. 2.Write your titles in your comp notebook next to each chapter section. For example, Chapter 1 “Gateway to Slavery” Outcome: 6 titled chapters

5 Lessons From the Past Envisioning My Future Tuesday Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from the experiences of others? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

6 Activity: Obtain Tuesday Purpose: to review a key passage from the narrative and examine how peers addressed the prompt Tasks: 1.Read 3 (or more) student models 2.Identify the following in each that you read: i.Identify Douglass’ feelings ii.give examples (consider “specific” words/phrases) that reveal these feelings iii.Shows how his feelings change iv.Shares what Douglass trying to show about how slavery makes people feel v.Explain what he is trying to reveal to/share with the reader about slavery 3.Return key passage analysis Outcome: Now you have the ability to review your own response with your partner and identify where you addressed the prompt and where you could make improvements

7 Grading 3 Categories – 20 Point total Content – 10 points Organization – 5 points Style - 5 points Rubric Score 8-7 A (10-9 pts., 5 pts.) 6-5 B (8 pts., 4 pts.) 4-3 C (7 pts., 3 pts.) 2-1 D (6 pts., 2 pts.)

8 Activities: Develop & Apply Tuesday Purpose: to review the Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass and connect it to our Enduring Understanding: If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Task: Discuss & Share Critical Questions 1.How did Douglass convince the reader that slavery is wrong? 2.What are all the factors that moved Douglass forward, toward becoming an influential free man? 3.What held him back? Outcome/DOL: By sharing these experiences, and his reactions to them, what overall message(s) do you think that Douglass is conveying to the reader?

9 Lessons From the Past Tuesday Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from the experiences of another? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

10 Grab a copy of the book Have out your composition notebook!

11 Hook, Housekeeping, & Homework Wednesday/Thursday What is theme? A central idea or statement that unifies and controls an entire literary work. a brief and meaningful insight OR a comprehensive vision of life may be a single idea "progress" (in many Victorian works) "order and duty" (in many early Roman works) "seize-the-day" (in many late Roman works) "jealousy" (in Shakespeare's Othello). But, what is the work saying about this single idea? may also be a more complicated doctrine "to justify the ways of God to men" (Milton’s Paradise Lost) "Socialism is the only sane reaction to the labor abuses in Chicago meat-packing plants" (Upton Sinclair's The Jungle) A theme is the author's way of communicating and sharing ideas, perceptions, and feelings with readers, and it may be directly stated in the book, or it may only be implied.

12 For example… “One theme that may be extracted by the reader of Mark Musa’s interpretation of Dante’s The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno is the need to take account of one’s own behavior now, for it affects one's condition in the afterlife. One example of this theme can be found in Canto V - “...when the evil soul appears before him, it confesses all, and he [Minos], who is the expert judge of sins, knows to what place in Hell the soul belongs: the times he wraps his tail around himself tells just how far the sinner must go down” (7-12). In addition, Dante’s use of literary techniques, such as imagery, further accentuates the theme for the consequences of not living right, for he describes “the cries and shrieks of lamentation” (III:22), “…the banks were coated with a slimy mold that stuck to them like glue, disgusting to behold and worse to smell” (XVIII: ) and many other terrifying examples of Hell.”

13 In Conclusion…. “In truly great works of literature, the author intertwines the theme throughout the work and the full impact is slowly realized as the reader processes the text. The ability to recognize a theme is important because it allows the reader to understand part of the author’s purpose in writing the book.” Mark Canada, Ph.D. Professor of English UNC-Pembroke

14 Past, Present, Future Wednesday/Thursday Review Narrative Theme & Key Passages Final Activities for Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass

15 Lessons From the Past Wednesday/Thursday Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 3 Writing and Composition Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence Analyze how literary components affect meaning Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

16 Instruction: Obtain - Outcome I Do Theme Statement: All humans have the strength within to overcome any obstacles, including generations of discrimination. Key passage: Stanza 8, lines Summary: Angelou compares herself to the ocean. Explanation: These two lines combine both ideas: the overall strength of a person as well as her specific ability to overcoming the discrimination her ancestors experienced. She uses a metaphor to the ocean to show the strength, “welling and swelling,” that a human can possess, but specifically calls herself a “black ocean,” a black woman with the powerful presence and ability to “bring in the tide”

17 Activities: Develop & Apply We Do Wednesday/Thursday Purpose: to identify overarching, universal theme for Douglass’ narrative Tasks: Identify a theme 1.What is this narrative about? Brainstorm subjects/topics, single ideas I Do Poem: strength, hope, determination, oppression, ancestor, addressing an oppressor 2.What is this narrative really saying about these subjects/topics? I Do Poem: Even under the greatest forms of oppression, one should always have hope. Pride enables people to overcome negative circumstances. All humans have the inner strength to overcome obstacles. 3.What events and ideas in the narrative support these themes? I Do Poem: Stanza 1 brings up negative lies of history, “But still, like dust, I’ll rise.” Stanza 8 compares herself to a “black ocean.” Stanza 9 repeats the of rising 5 times. Etc. 4.Discuss which theme is the most important to the narrative as a whole and why Outcome: finalize one powerful, well-written theme statement to explain

18 Activities: Develop & Apply We Do Wednesday/Thursday Purpose: to identify the key circumstances (passages) of Frederick Douglass’ life that support an overarching theme for his narrative Tasks: 1.What events and ideas in the narrative support your theme statement? 2.Select 3 distinct passages (2-4 paragraphs) that support your theme 3.Discuss how you would explain how the 3 passages are key to supporting your theme Outcome: A verbal/visual explanation of a universal theme statement with explicit references & justifications to 3 key passages from the narrative that support the theme

19 Outcome Wednesday/Thursday Key passage 1 Theme Statement (same for entire group) Chapter, page, paragraph #s (2-3) Summary sentence Explanation/justification sentences Picture, symbol Key passage 2 Theme Statement (same for entire group) Chapter, page, paragraph #s (2-3) Summary sentence Explanation/justification sentences Picture, symbol Key passage 3 Theme Statement (same for entire group) Chapter, page, paragraph #s (2-3) Summary sentence Explanation/justification sentences Picture, symbol

20 Lessons From the Past Wednesday/Thursday Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 3 Writing and Composition Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence Analyze how literary components affect meaning Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

21 Hook, Housekeeping, Homework Friday Respond in Writing to Critical Questions Have you? Do so now! 1.How does Douglass convince the reader that slavery is wrong? What does he include in his narrative? How does he write? How does he present ideas? 2.What are all the factors that moved Douglass forward, toward becoming an influential free man? 3.What held him back? Discuss/Share in preparation for today’s writing assignment. Homework: Enjoy your weekend

22 Past, Present, Future Narrative Theme & Key Passages Final Activities for Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass Memoir: Night by Elie Wiesel

23 Lessons From the Past Envisioning My Future Friday Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 3 Writing and Composition Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence Analyze how literary components affect meaning Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

24 Activity: Develop & Apply Friday Purpose: to understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, in order to envision and create your own future. Task: Brainstorm responses to the following questions: 1.How do Frederick Douglass’ specific actions show you ways to conquer or work around obstacles? 2.How do his actions show you ways to use strengths and assets you have? 3.How can the experiences of his help you achieve your goals? Outcome: What have you learned from reading about the life of Frederick Douglass? Write a short constructed response that explains how the circumstances of Frederick Douglass’ life can help you envision and create your own future. Make sure to… Identify specific goals that you have for yourself Give examples of specific instances/actions in Frederick Douglass’ life Explain in detail how your knowledge of Douglass’ actions can help you overcome specific obstacles and/or help you use your own strengths to achieve your goals Turn the assignment in to the front desk! Complete the next activity.

25 Activity: Apply Friday Respond 1.What does the word “invisible” mean? 2.What does it mean to be “invisible”? 3.What are some things you think about when you think about “invisibility”? 4.How does something become “invisible”?

26 Instruction: Obtain Friday Quick Facts NAME: Ralph Ellison Full Name: Ralph Waldo EllisonRalph OCCUPATION: Educator, Literary Critic, Academic Author, AuthorEducatorLiterary CriticAuthor BIRTH DATE: March 01, 1914March DEATH DATE: April 16, 1994April EDUCATION: Tuskegee University PLACE OF BIRTH: Oklahoma City, OklahomaOklahoma PLACE OF DEATH: New York, New York "Looked at historically, there is no question but that this society started out with a divided mind, if not with a divided conscience. Its founders asserted the noble idea of creating a free, open society while retaining slavery, a system in direct contradiction to their rhetorically inclusive concept of freedom." – Ralph Ellison

27 Activity: Apply Friday Purpose: to relate two texts of literary merit (one primary source memoir, one novel) from two different historical period (1800s to 1900s) to examine the opening paragraphs of the novel Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and relate the sentiments of Ellison’s main character to Tasks: 1.Read the excerpt 2.Annotate the text with your thoughts (reactions, questions, connections, etc.) 3.Circle the best description of Ellison's feelings and respond 4.Box the best description for Douglass’ feelings and respond “Restate” the prompt Answer the question Prove through textual evidence Thoroughly answer the prompt

28 Envisioning My Future Friday Colorado Academic Standards 3 Writing and Composition Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience 4 Research & Reasoning Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions Objective: you will be able to Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence Analyze how literary components affect meaning Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

29 TIMELINE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS (All dates are approximate since slaves were kept ignorant of the concept of time or dates.) 1818 Frederick Bailey (Douglass) born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, Maryland. Mother—Harriet Bailey, a slave; father—a white man, perhaps the master. Separated from mother in infancy Harriet Bailey dies; seen only by son four or five times when she’d travel twelve miles by foot at night Lived on the “Great House Farm” plantation of Colonel Edward Lloyd; master was Captain Anthony, Colonel Lloyd’s clerk Moved to Baltimore, Maryland, home of Mr. Hugh Auld, brother of Colonel Lloyd’s son-in-law, Captain Thomas Auld Mrs. Sophia Auld, new mistress, begins to teach Frederick to read; Mr. Auld finds out and forbids it, calling it “unlawful” and “unsafe.” Lives with Aulds; continues to learn to read and write, often bribing the poor white children to help him Returns to Colonel Lloyd’s plantation after death of Captain Anthony and his youngest son Richard so that property, including horses and slaves, can be divided between two surviving children, Mrs. Lucretia and Master Andrew; falls to the portion of Mrs. Lucretia and is returned to Baltimore Reads “The Columbian Orator,” giving words to his feelings about slavery; learns the meaning of the word “abolition”; meets two kind Irishmen who advise him to run away to the north; “from that time on I resolved to run away.”

30 TIMELINE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS (The following dates are more accurate since Frederick has learned to read and understands dates.) March, 1832 Mrs. Lucretia and Master Andrew have both died; Master Thomas Auld, Lucretia’s husband, remarries and has a misunderstanding with Master Hugh. As punishment of Hugh, Frederick goes to live with Master Thomas in St. Michael’s, Maryland. Master Thomas is not as good a master; he feeds his slaves very little. Jan. 1, 1833 Sent to live with Mr. Covey who has the reputation “for breaking young slaves”; Frederick is frequently whipped. He writes, “Mr. Covey succeeded in breaking me. I was broken in body, soul, and spirit. My natural elasticity was crushed, my intellect languished, the disposition to read departed, the cheerful spark that lingered about my eye died; the dark night of slavery closed in upon me; and behold a man transformed into a brute!” Aug Frederick becomes ill in the fields; Mr. Covey whips him. Frederick runs away from Mr. Covey and files a complaint with Master Auld which is rejected. When Frederick returns to Mr. Covey’s he vows to fight which he does; Mr. Covey’s treatment toward him begins to change; Frederick vows that he never will be whipped again. “This battle with Mr. Covey... rekindled the few expiring embers of freedom, and revived within me a sense of my own manhood.” Jan. 1, 1834 Moved to home of Mr. William Freeland, three miles from St. Michael’s. Mr. Freeland was “an educated southern gentleman” and much kinder to the slaves. Frederick begins a Sabbath school for slaves; if they were caught they would be whipped, but they wanted to learn to read and write.

31 TIMELINE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS Jan Mr. Freeland again hires Frederick from his master. Frederick and several other slaves plot an escape but are discovered and sent to jail. For a reason unknown to Frederick, Master Thomas Auld decides to send him back to Baltimore to Hugh Auld Sent to learn the trade of caulking at a shipyard; severely injured in fight with white carpenters; Mr. Hugh Auld takes Frederick to work in shipyard where he is foreman; Frederick learns quickly and is soon earning wages which he must turn over to Master Hugh Auld. Spring 1838 Frederick applies to Master Thomas to allow him to hire his time; Thomas refuses; however, later Hugh agrees making a deal which guarantees him more money. Frederick agrees to the plan since it is the only way he can earn money to escape. When Frederick goes out of the city on work without permission, Master Hugh tells him to “bring my tools and clothing home forthwith.” This makes Frederick more committed to find a way to escape. Sept. 3, 1838 Frederick escapes to New York; he does not reveal the means in his narrative, stating that it could embarrass some and keep others from escaping; he is helped by Mr. David Ruggles who houses Frederick in his boarding house and helps him get Anna Murray, a free black woman, to New York. Sept. 15, 1838 Anna Murray and Frederick Johnson (name changed from Frederick Bailey) marry; this is particularly important since slaves were not permitted to marry; they leave for New Bedford. In New Bedford the couple is helped by Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Johnson. Frederick asks the Johnsons to help him pick a new name; Mr. Johnson who is reading “Lady of the Lake” selects Douglass. Aug. 11, 1841 At the anti-slavery convention at Nantucket Mr. William C. Coffin urges Frederick Douglass to speak. Douglass writes, “It was a severe cross, and I took it up reluctantly. The truth was, I felt myself a slave, and the idea of speaking to white people weighed me down.”

32 10 th Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences an audience 2. Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 2. The development of new ideas and concepts within informational and persuasive manuscripts 3. Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts 3. Writing and Composition 1. Literary or narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an audience 2. Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience 3. Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process 4.Research and Reasoning 1. Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions 2. An author’s reasoning is the essence of legitimate writing and requires evaluating text for validity and accuracy

33 Extra

34 AP Language & Composition 1997: Question 2. (Suggested time—40 minutes) The following passage comes from the 1845 autobiography Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Read the passage carefully, noting such elements as syntax, figurative language, and selection of detail. Then write an essay in which you identify the stylistic elements in the third paragraph that distinguish it from the rest of the passage and show how this difference reinforces Douglass’ rhetorical purpose in the passage as a whole. Chapter X (10). Paragraphs 5 – 8, “If at any one time of my life more than another… and at the next reconciling myself to my wretched lot.” https://aptestreview.flvs.net/FLVSAPReview/HTMLContent/aplang_tr_ nf/mod3/passage04/4_4_5.htm

35 What is a symbol? What do these symbolize?

36 Instruction: Obtain I Do – You Do Purpose; to review the events that have positively propelled and/or held back Douglass Tasks: With a partner, create a picture or symbol for your assigned chapter For example, this drawing might represent how Douglass realized that they could not enslave his mind… DOL/Outcome: Be prepared to share!

37 Lessons From the Past Envisioning My Future Colorado Academic Standards 2 Reading for All Purposes Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 3 Writing and Composition Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience 4 Research & Reasoning Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions Objective: you will be able to Objectives You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence Analyze how literary components affect meaning Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn form the experiences of others? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like? HOMEWORK:


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