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This Week. Monday President’s Day = No School Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday Be prepared to turn in Night and, with your ID, check out The Glass.

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Presentation on theme: "This Week. Monday President’s Day = No School Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday Be prepared to turn in Night and, with your ID, check out The Glass."— Presentation transcript:

1 This Week

2 Monday President’s Day = No School

3 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Tuesday Be prepared to turn in Night and, with your ID, check out The Glass Castle.

4 Past, Present, Future Tuesday Night written summative (symbolism & theme) The Glass Castle – Preview Text PARCC formatting The Glass Castle – Begin reading

5 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Tuesday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

6 Instruction: Obtain You Do Tuesday Purpose: to familiarize ourselves with the text. Tasks: Read and examine the front & back covers Look through the first few pages: What do you notice? What information can be found here? How might this information be relevant? Look through the text: How big is the font? Are there chapters? Titles? How long are chapters? How long is the book? Flip open to a random page and read a paragraph Anything of note at the end of the book? Outcome: What did you learn from previewing the text? Predictions? How long do you think this will take you to read? Do you think you’ll “like” it? Make sure you have it with you tomorrow; we’ll start reading together in class!

7 Activity Tuesday Let’s take a look at the English practice test (see link below) to practice understanding the format of the computer-based PARCC test View English Practice Test Scroll to Grade Levels – select Grade 10 Click on Computer-based Practice Test

8 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Wednesday Open up your comp notebook: The Glass Castle 2/18/15 Make a list: What do you need?Vs.What do you want? Do most people know the difference between what they want and what they need? WHY?

9 Past, Present, Future Wednesday The Glass Castle – Preview Text PARCC formatting The Glass Castle – Begin reading – Section I The Glass Castle – ARG: Content & Craft

10 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Wednesday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

11 Before We Begin…. Wednesday Having read Night, we have explored the worst of human dysfunction and have seen the resilience of the human spirit to not only survive man’s capacity for inhumanity but to move forward toward a better world. Keep in mind our Enduring Understanding: The circumstances of people’s lives and past can propel them forward towards a future they envision or hold them back in a past they cannot change. In other words, we can become victims to our circumstances or use our circumstances to move forward in more positive ways. Discuss: Does Elie Wiesel use his experiences in the Holocaust to propel himself—and the world—forward, or allow them to hold him back? How so? Now we’re going to read another memoir, The Glass Castle. In it we will look at a very different form of what we might define as dysfunction: family dysfunction. Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. Please note that this memoir has some challenging and mature content, including a few offensive words and sexual situations, but this realistic portrayal offers a glimpse into one woman’s intriguing and difficult past and her ability to use her strengths and assets to achieve her personal goals.

12 Activities: Develop & Apply Tuesday Chapter 1: A Woman on the Street Purpose: to form initial opinions and responses to opening chapter of The Glass Castle. Tasks: Read the Section 1 aloud and consider the following questions as you read: What can you infer about the circumstances of Jeannette’s life growing up in her family? What is her attitude toward her mother? What is your attitude towards or response to Jeannette’s mother and towards Jeannette? What do you want to know about them after reading Part 1 of the memoir? Why do you think Walls chooses to begin her memoir in this way? Outcome: Respond in writing in your composition notebook to the above.

13 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Wednesday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

14 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Thursday Yesterday a student inquired about how Jeannette became so different as an adult than her parents seem to be. Let’s take a moment to consider “nature versus nurture." “Nature versus nurture" is a psychology term related to whether heredity or the environment most impacts human psychological development (behavior, habits, intelligence, personality, sexuality, aggressive tendencies, and so on). It's obvious that you share your parents' DNA in the physical sense — you might have long legs like your father and blue eyes like your mother. But where did you get your love of reading poetry, your quick wit, or your natural athletic abilities? That's what the nature versus nurture debate tackles. Some scientists think that your personality is based on genetic predispositions (nature). Other scientists think the way you act stems from life experience, the way you were taught, and the environment in which you grew up (nurture). Nature vs. nurture. What are the main arguments in this debate? 1.What environmental factors are the most important in influencing a child? How and why? 2.What environmental factors are less important in influencing child? How and why? 3.How much does the way one was raised influence a person’s adult life? Are there ways to overcome one’s upbringing? Explain. 4.How much responsibility should a parent give a child? What do you think? Turn to a shoulder partner and discuss. HW: Read TGC, pp

15 Past, Present, Future Thursday The Glass Castle – Begin reading – Section I The Glass Castle – Begin reading Section 2– Irony HW: Read TGC, pp The Glass Castle Scavenger Hunt ARG: Content & Craft

16 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Thursday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

17 Activity: Develop & Apply Thursday Purpose: to recognize and draw inferences about the effects of an author’s use of irony. Tasks: 1.Review - note sheet & next slide 2.Practice: What is the irony in the following video? More importantly, what’s the effect of the irony on us as viewer and audience? https://www.yout ube.com/watch?v=rnEB2F_v_cE 3.Critical Reading: Read pages 9-16 of The Glass Castle. 4.Complete 1-3 on your Irony note sheet (back side) 5.Review - slide 19 6.Continue to read and answer the following prompts in your comp notebook: 1.What qualities do you see in Jeannette’s character? What do you find striking or unusual for a three year old? 2.What can you infer about the life she and her siblings lead at home? 3.What thoughts about and reactions do you have to Jeannette’s mom and dad? 4.Choose what you feel to be the best example of irony from the reading. What is it, explain why it is ironic, and analyze the effect it has on you as reader. Outcome: Critical reading of TGC, pp for Friday

18 Instruction: Obtain Thursday What is IRONY? There are several types of irony in literature. Three main types are verbal irony, dramatic irony, and situational irony. Verbal Irony: This is the contrast between what is said and what is meant. In other words, sarcasm. Dramatic Irony: This is the contrast between what the character thinks to be true and what we (the reader) know to be true. Sometimes as we read we are placed in the position of knowing more than what one character knows. Because we know something the character does not, we read to discover how the character will react when he or she learns the truth of the situation. Think: soap operas! A form of dramatic irony in which a character who is about to become a victim of disaster uses words that have one meaning to him and quite another to the spectator or those who are aware of the real situation is called TRAGIC IRONY. In some instances the character may not be about to become a victim, but rather their statement is based on partial knowledge or misunderstanding, and the spectator is aware of the truth of the situation. Situational Irony: This is the most common in literature. It is the contrast between what happens and what was expected (or what would seem appropriate). Because it emerges from the events and circumstances of a story it is often more subtle and effective than verbal or dramatic irony

19 Instruction: Obtain Thursday What’s ironic from section 1?Explain why it’s ironic.Explain deeper truth/reality. Mom told me she had entered my name in a raffle at a fair, and I had won a helicopter ride. I was thrilled. I had never been in a helicopter of a plane. “When do I get to go on the ride?” I asked. “Oh, we already did that,” she said. “It was fun.” p.13 The irony lies in the fact that most parents would reward their kids with a treat after enduring such a difficult ordeal. Think of it as a treat! The Walls don’t. They leave their kid in the hospital and go have fun without her. The truth revealed in the Walls’s decision to go on the helicopter ride without Jeannette is that they are rather selfish adults. They use up the fun stuff for themselves instead of making it an experience that Jeanette would remember forever. It seems that they put themselves before anyone else – their kids included.

20 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Thursday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

21 While You Wait… Friday 1.The first story Walls tells of her childhood is that of her burning herself severely at age three, and her father dramatically takes her from the hospital: "You're safe now" (p. 14). Why do you think she opens with that story? How does it set the stage for the rest of the memoir? 2.What is the attitude of other adults toward what has occurred? Cite specific examples. 3.Why does Jeannette like being in the hospital? (p. 11) 4.Rose Mary Walls is upset when nurses give Jeannette chewing gum. Why is this ironic when compared with Mary’s other behaviors? (p. 12) 5.On page 13: What does the parents’ decision to go on the helicopter ride suggest about them? (p. 13) 6.What do you think of father’s argument with the doctor regarding Jeannette’s bandages and infection? 7.What is “checking out Rex Walls-style”? 8.What does treatment of cat suggest about the parents? Why would this make a child fearful? (pp ) 9.What do you think of what the mother tells Jeannette in order to justify why they are leaving the cat? 10.What does Brian’s reaction suggest about his nature?

22 Hook, Housekeeping & Homework Friday Have out your composition notebook to your note on The Glass Castle. Respond in Writing: What makes for good parenting? What are the basic things a guardian should provide for a small child? List them. What balances need to be struck? HW: Read pages 29-48

23 Past, Present, Future Friday The Glass Castle – Begin reading Section 2– Irony HW: Read TGC, pp The Glass Castle Characterization ARG: Content & Craft The Glass Castle Scavenger Hunt & Questions to Consider

24 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Friday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. You will be able to read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it, citing specific evidence to support conclusions drawn from the text. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

25 Activity: Develop & Apply Friday Purpose: to identify details that support inferences about characters. Characterization: thoughts, behaviors, speech, appearance, interacting/reacting with others, how others react/interact with. Tasks: In your groups from yesterday, review pages and … Discuss the most striking, interesting, surprising, shocking (whatever) developments you read about in these pages. Discuss your reactions to these plot developments, and what you are learning about themes and characters in the story. Make a list of the top five developments in your comp notebook. What positive and negative qualities do you see in Jeannette's parents? Keep in mind what you all wrote about what makes for good parenting, and what you learned about Rex and Rosemary Walls in your reading. Create & complete a Parenting Chart like the one below. Positive qualities you see in her dad's character and parenting (with examples). Negative qualities you see in her dad's character and parenting (with examples). Positive qualities you see in her mom's character and parenting (with examples). Negative qualities you see in her mom's character and parenting (with examples).

26 Title: The Glass Castle Author: Jeannette Walls Publication Date: 2005 Genre: Memoir CONTENT: The WHAT What does it say? What is expressed? What is inferred? In the last activity, you identified qualities (traits) and examples to support these qualities. This is content. CRAFT: THE HOW How has the writer used language and craft to develop the content? Begin to consider, what literary and stylistic tools is Walls using to create these characters? Irony Symbols or motifs Figurative language (metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole) Descriptive imagery (see, hear, smell, taste, touch) Diction (specific, powerful words) Dialogue Detail

27 Instruction: Obtain Friday Purpose: to identify the ARG 2-column process to analyze content & craft Content: THE WHAT What does it say? What is expressed? What is inferred? Craft: THE HOW How has the writer used language and craft to develop the content? Mom/Rose Mary says to Jeannette after she is out of the hospital: “You’ve got to get right back in the saddle. You can’t live in fear of something as basic as fire.” (p. 15) Dad came home in the middle of the night. “Where are we going, Dad?” I asked. “Wherever we end up,” he said. (pp )

28 Activity Let’s read! HW: Read pages 29-48

29 Narrative: Lessons From the Past Friday Colorado Academic Standard(s) 2 Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts Objective You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Content & Craft Theme Key Passages Relevance Critical readers reflect on the connections between historical context and author’s perspectives and their effect on the readers’ interpretations of literary texts including the concept of truth and how this shapes identity and relationships. If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? Why should we subject ourselves to unpleasant aspects of the past? Or should we? Is this work relevant today? How and why? Who should read this and why?

30 Coming Soon… Monday Scavenger Hunt & Questions to Consider HM: Tuesday Tinkerbell model & pick a key passage HM: Wednesday KPA Practice – Model Fire in the Lab, Do Hot Pocket HM: Thursday Fishbowl 1 HM: Friday (sub) Venn Diagram & HM: Monday Read Final Though Questions HM Read through 185 by Friday!

31 PARCC Week Monday Read Final Though Questions HM Read through 185 by Friday! Friday Fishbowl 2 HM:

32 9 th – 13 th

33 Lessons From the Past Monday Colorado Academic Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences an audience 2. Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening 2. Reading For All Purposes Objectives You will be able to listen actively, pose thoughtful questions, and contribute findings & supporting information about The Glass Castle. Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

34 Activity: We Do Monday Purpose: to practice our large group discussion skills by listening actively, posing thoughtful questions, and contributing findings & supporting information in order to come to a better understanding of The Glass Castle. Tasks: 1.Form into a fishbowl discussion group – sit where you can see and hear your partner (typically across the bowl from him/her) 2.Make sure you have appropriate materials out (memoir, writing utensil, other notes, Observation Form) 3.Observer – use the Observation Form to document how often your partner is on or off task with the discussion and record reflection notes 4.Speaker – participate in the conversation by posing and responding (with supporting evidence) to questions that analyze the components of the story (characters, setting, point of view, conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution, and theme) - REFER TO THE TEXT WHEN RESPONDING 5.If time, switch! 6.Turn in the completed Observation Form at the end of the discussions Outcome: a better understanding of the memoir and of the expectations for large group discussions

35 Instruction: Obtain Monday What criteria will be used to measure the effectiveness of a group? Everyone contributes Nothing to contribute, ask a question Prepared – novel, notes, paper etc. Know what you’re talking about Stay on topic Respect each other No bashing Let others finish thought No side tracks, side conversations Academic vocabulary How will you be assessed? Not just the number of times you participate (speak) but what you have to say Analysis of literary devices and theme Textual references followed by analysis (inferences) Furthering a point of another student If you don’t speak, the highest score you can receive for actively listening today is a “C.” Keep in mind part of your grade is show your close reading of the text; you’ll need to speak to do this! Refer to your ARG notes. Those who have a #2 assigned question within our page range of 1-34 are expected to sit in the inner circle today and facilitate the discussion

36 Past, Present, Future Tuesday The Glass Castle Fishbowl Discussion #1 HOMEWORK: READ THROUGH PAGE 53 BY TOMORROW & COMPLETE 2 MORE ENTRIES IN ARG 2-COLUMN NOTES The Glass Castle Key Passage Analysis Read through page 148 by next Monday and complete 5-10 more entries in your ARG 2-column notes MAP Testing on ELP Day – Meet in the Multi-Media Lab Read through page 148 by next Monday and complete 5-10 more entries in your ARG 2-column notes

37 Lessons From the Past Tuesday Colorado Academic Standards Standard 2 Reading for All Purposes Objectives You will be able to read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it, citing specific evidence to support conclusions. Enduring Understandings/Relevance If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future. Essential Questions What can I learn from another’s experiences? How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back? What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?

38 CONTENT Summarize the passage Look for phrases, lines, sentences… What are key or important details? – Quote these directly! Significant descriptions? – Quote these directly! Revealing dialogue? – Quote these directly! What thoughts/ideas and feelings/emotions are expressed? What can we infer about the characters—their traits, conflicts, motives, etc. Does the passage mark a turning point for a character, reinforce key traits, etc. What can we infer about main ideas and themes? Does the passage help develop or reinforce an important theme or lesson? How does the passage further develop plot and conflict? Does the passage intensify or resolve any key conflicts in the book? Does it contain important plot developments? What can we infer about the writer’s purpose?

39 CRAFT How has the writer used language and craft to develop the content? What literary and stylistic tools breathe life into the passage, give it voice? Elements of narrative: Remember the four basic elements of narrative—plot, character, setting, and conflict. Which of these are prominent in the passage? Also, consider two basic tools narrative writer’s use—dialogue and description; most passages will use both in important ways. Diction: Diction refers to very deliberate word choices a writer makes to create a certain meaning or effect. How has the writer used vocabulary and patterns of diction to develop the content? Remember to consider both denotative and connotative meanings. Descriptive imagery: Imagery appeals to the five senses and helps the reader see, hear, smell, taste, and feel the experiences the writer wants them to experience. Figurative Language: The poet Richard Wilbur says that “nothing is so like itself as when it is compared.” That’s what figurative language does: compares things to other things to add depth and emotional texture to meaning. How has the writer used metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, etc., and to what effect? Symbols or motifs: Do any of the details of the passage have symbolic significance. Any important motifs that recur in the passage? Irony: Jeannette Walls uses lots of irony in her memoir. Do any important ironies or paradoxes exist in the passage? If so, what truths, realities or ideas are revealed?

40 Key Passage Analysis - I Do Content – Detail paraphrase & Quotes After Jeannette is released from the hospital, she cooks hot dogs again. Her mom comments, “Good for you. You’ve got to get right back in the saddle,” and her dad says “she fought fire and won!” She starts stealing matches from her dad, looking for bigger and bigger fires and lighting brush on fire. She holds a lit match close to her favorite toy Tinkerbell’s face, and the doll ends up catching on fire, and its face melts. She tries to smooth its features, but it was too late. She puts bandages on it, and, like herself, Jeannette wished Tinkerbell could get a skin graft. She still considers it her favorite toy. (Chapter II The Desert, pages 15-16) Craft & Conclusions Jeannette’s courage: She faces her fear by cooking hotdogs Jeannette’s dangerous fascination with fire and vulnerability: She develops an unsafe fascination with fire, Her parents tale pride in the fact she confronts fire/fear. Parallels between burned doll: both are scarred, but hardened by their experiences. The scars make them stronger and more likeable. Conflict: Conflict between Jeannette—her courage and daring—and the dangerous forces of her world: Neglect of her parents, the danger of things like fire, etc. Dialogue: Parents comments encouraging Jeannette to face fire again. Builds understanding of Jeannette’s courage and daring, and her parents willingness to let her learn by facing dangers in life—of their neglect. Imagery: The vivid images and descriptions of fire throughout the passage show both the fascinating beauty of fire and the dangers it poses. These symbolically represent the adventure and excitement of Jeannette’s life but also the dangers that life exposes her to. Symbolism: Tinkerbelle, scared but hardened and made special, becomes a symbol for Jeannette, with her burn scars, strength, and uniqueness. Motif: Motif of fire recurs in the passage, becoming more and more symbolic of Jeannette’s upbringing and life.

41 We Do Tuesday Purpose: to identify and analyze a key passage from The Glass Castle. Tasks: 1.Choose what you consider to be a key passage from pp (any passage you found striking and revealing). Limit the passage to about 40 lines or less. 2.Reread the passage, taking notes on content (left column ARG) 3.Reread the passage, taking notes on craft & drawing conclusions/making inferences (right column ARG) Outcome: Discuss content and craft in the passages you chose. Read pages and add an entry to your ARG Read through page 148 by next Monday and complete 5-10 more entries in your ARG 2-column notes

42 Conclusions About Content & Analysis of Craft Setting Characterization Conflict Climax Resolution Mood Tone Suspense Theme Repetition Parallelism Metaphor Simile Personification Hyperbole Dialogue Diction Imagery Symbolism Foreshadowing Flashback Irony Syntax Motif Humor Allusion Alliteration Assonance

43 10 th Standards 1. Oral Expression and Listening 1. Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences an audience 2. Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening 2. Reading for All Purposes 1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts 2. The development of new ideas and concepts within informational and persuasive manuscripts 3. Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts 3. Writing and Composition 1. Literary or narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an audience 2. Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience 3. Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process 4.Research and Reasoning 1. Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions 2. An author’s reasoning is the essence of legitimate writing and requires evaluating text for validity and accuracy


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