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Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 1 Lamb, Hair, McDaniel CHAPTER 17 Advertising and Public Relations 2011-2012 ©

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 1 Lamb, Hair, McDaniel CHAPTER 17 Advertising and Public Relations 2011-2012 ©"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 1 Lamb, Hair, McDaniel CHAPTER 17 Advertising and Public Relations © iStockphoto.com/Lachlan Currie

2 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 2 The Effects of Advertising  U.S. advertising declined in 2009 due to economic conditions  In 2008, 37 companies spent more than $1 billion each  850,000 people work in media advertising such as newspapers, magazines, television, radio, and internet media.  More than 100 companies spend over $300 million annually on advertising. LO 1

3 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 3 Advertising and Market Share New brands with a small market share spend proportionally more for advertising and sales promotion than those with a large market share.  Beyond a certain level of spending, diminishing returns set in.  New brands require higher spending to reach a minimum level of exposure needed to affect purchase habits. LO 1

4 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 4 The Effects of Advertising on Consumers  Advertising may change a consumer’s negative attitude toward a product, or reinforce a positive attitude.  Advertising can affect consumer ranking of a brand’s attributes. LO 1

5 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 5 Major Types of Advertising Institutional Advertising Institutional Advertising Enhances a company’s image rather than promote a particular product. Product Advertising Product Advertising Touts the benefits of a specific good or service. LO 2

6 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 6 Major Types of Advertising Corporate identity Pioneering Competitive Comparative Product Advertising Product Advertising Institutional Advertising Institutional Advertising Advocacy advertising LO 2

7 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 7 Product Advertising PioneeringPioneering  Stimulates primary demand for new product or category  Used in the PLC introductory stageCompetitiveCompetitive  Influences demand for brand in the growth phase of the PLC  Often uses emotional appeal ComparativeComparative  Compares two or more competing brands’ product attributes  Used if growth is sluggish, or if competition is strong LO 2

8 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 8 Creative Decisions in Advertising A series of related advertisements focusing on a common theme, slogan, and set of advertising appeals. Advertising Campaign LO 3

9 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 9 Creative Decisions in Advertising Determine the advertising objectives Make creative decisions Make media decisions Evaluate the campaign LO 3

10 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 10 Setting Objectives: The DAGMAR Approach Define target audience Define desired percentage change Define the time frame for change LO 3

11 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 11 Creative Decisions Develop and evaluate advertising appeals Execute the message Evaluate the campaign’s effectiveness Identify product benefits LO 3

12 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 12 Identify Product Benefits  “Sell the Sizzle, not the Steak”  Sell product’s benefits, not its attributes  A benefit should answer “What’s in it for me?”  Ask “So?” to determine if advertising offers attributes or benefits LO 3

13 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 13 Identify Product Benefits Attribute Benefit “With just 10 calories per serving, Propel hydrates and contains Vitamins C & E, B Vitamins, and antioxidants. Propel is conveniently available in both ready-to-drink and powder form.” “Propel fuels real women who are energized and empowered by physical activity and understand their need to replenish, energize, and protect in all aspects of their lives.” “So?” LO 3

14 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 14 LO 3 Exhibit 17.1 Common Advertising Appeals

15 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 15 Unique Selling Proposition A desirable, exclusive, and believable advertising appeal selected as the theme for a campaign. Unique Selling Proposition LO 3

16 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 16 Executing the Message Mood or Image Musical Demon- stration Demon- stration Scientific Real/ Animated Product Real/ Animated Product Fantasy Lifestyle Slice-of-Life Humorous Spokes- person/ Testimonial Spokes- person/ Testimonial LO 3 Symbols

17 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 17 Media Decisions in Advertising Newspapers Magazines Radio Television Internet Outdoor Media Direct Mail Trade Exhibits Cooperative Advertising Brochures Coupons Catalogs Special Events Monitored Media Unmonitored Media LO 4

18 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 18 Major Advertising Media Newspapers Magazines Radio Television Outdoor Media Internet LO 4

19 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 19 Newspapers Advantages  Geographic selectivity  Short-term advertiser commitments  News value and immediacy  Year-round readership  High individual market coverage  Co-op and local tie-in availability  Short lead time Disadvantages  Limited demographic selectivity  Limited color  Low pass-along rate  May be expensive LO 4

20 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 20 An arrangement in which the manufacturer and the retailer split the costs of advertising the manufacturer’s brand. Cooperative Advertising LO 4

21 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 21 Magazines Advantages  Good reproduction  Demographic selectivity  Regional/local selectivity  Long advertising life  High pass-along rate Disadvantages  Long-term advertiser commitments  Slow audience build- up  Limited demonstration capabilities  Lack of urgency  Long lead time LO 4

22 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 22 Radio Advantages  Low cost  Immediacy of message  Short notice scheduling  No seasonal audience change  Highly portable  Short-term advertiser commitments  Entertainment carryover Disadvantages  No visual treatment  Short advertising life  High frequency to generate comprehension and retention  Background distractions  Commercial clutter LO 4

23 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 23 Television Advantages  Wide, diverse audience  Low cost per thousand  Creative opportunities for demonstration  Immediacy of messages  Entertainment carryover  Demographic selectivity with cable Disadvantages  Short life of message  Consumer skepticism  High campaign cost  Little demographic selectivity with stations  Long-term advertiser commitments  Long lead times for production  Commercial clutter LO 4

24 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 24 Internet Advantages  Fast growing  Ability to reach narrow target audience  Short lead time  Moderate cost Disadvantages  Difficult to measure ad effectiveness and ROI  Ad exposure relies on “click through” from banner ads  Not all consumers have access to Internet LO 4

25 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 25 Outdoor Media Advantages  Repetition  Moderate cost  Flexibility  Geographic selectivity Disadvantages  Short message  Lack of demographic selectivity  High “noise” level LO 4

26 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 26 Google Google ’s AdWords (Ads Work!) Google's total revenue in 2008 was $21.8 billion and of this, $21.1 billion was derived from advertising. At the end of its third quarter in 2009, the company’s total revenue was $16.9 billion, $16.4 billion from advertising. To appreciate just how much Google has grown, consider this—in 2003 the company's total revenue was $1.46 billion with advertising revenue representing $1.42 billion. Source: last visited November 12, 2009http://investor.google.com/fin_data.html last visited November 12 LO 4 Beyond the Book

27 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 27 Alternative Media Ads before Movies Interactive Kiosks Computer Screen Savers Computer Screen Savers Shopping Carts DVDs and CDs Advertainments Cell Phone Ads Subway Tunnel Ads Subway Tunnel Ads Floor Ads Video Game Ads LO 4

28 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 28 Media Selection Considerations Medium Flexibility Target Audience Considerations Reach Cost Per Contact Frequency Noise Level Medium Life Span

29 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 29 Qualitative Factors in Media Selection  Attention to the commercial and the program  Involvement  Program liking  Lack of distractions  Other audience behaviors LO 4

30 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 30 Media Scheduling Continuous Media Schedule Flighted Media Schedule Pulsing Media Schedule Seasonal Media Schedule Advertising is run steadily throughout the period. Advertising is run heavily every other month or every two weeks. Advertising combines continuous scheduling with flighting. Advertising is run only when the product is likely to be used. LO 4

31 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 31 Public Relations The element in the promotional mix that: Public Relations Public Relations  evaluates public attitudes  identifies issues of public concern  executes programs to gain public acceptance LO 5

32 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 32 Functions of Public Relations Press relations Product publicity Corporate communication Public affairs Lobbying Employee and investor relations Crisis management LO 5

33 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 33 Public Relations Tools Product placement Consumer education Sponsorship Company Web sites New product publicity LO 5

34 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 34 Consumer Education Sites consumer.gov/idtheftIdentity theft privacyrights.orgConsumer privacy rights and responsibilities annualcreditreport.comOne free credit report/consumer each year consumeraction.govBroad range of consumer education topics consumerworld.orgLatest consumer news consumerreports.org/main/home.jspUnbiased product information consumer.govDirects consumers to fed gov’t sites pueblo.gsa.govBrochures and pamphlets ftc.gov/ftc/consumer.htmUnfair and deceptive business practices fcc.govRadio, television, satellite, and telephone motorist.orgLists car repair shops meeting set standards recall.govSafety and product recall information cpsc.govSafety, toys, nursery equipment, home appliances, furniture, computers, fireworks nhtsa.govDefects in automobiles, crash test ratings, safety recalls, air bags and child safety seats fda.govFood safety or food products, prescription or over the counter drugs, or medical devices Beyond the Book

35 Chapter 17 Copyright ©2012 by Cengage Learning Inc. All rights reserved 35 Managing Unfavorable Publicity A coordinated effort to handle the effects of unfavorable publicity or an unexpected unfavorable event. Crisis Management Crisis Management LO 5


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