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Persuasive Presentations Jeff Ritchie WWII. Presentations (60 points total)  Audience – your client and WWII students  Persuasive- Different Purposes.

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Presentation on theme: "Persuasive Presentations Jeff Ritchie WWII. Presentations (60 points total)  Audience – your client and WWII students  Persuasive- Different Purposes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Persuasive Presentations Jeff Ritchie WWII

2 Presentations (60 points total)  Audience – your client and WWII students  Persuasive- Different Purposes –illustrates how project meets client's needs –explains and showcases your project –argues why the client should choose your project over others  PowerPoint presentation  15 minutes minimum, 20 maximum

3 Two types of Presentations-  New Business Presentations  Project Presentations

4 Two types of Presentations-  New Business Presentations  Project Presentations

5 New Business Presentations –(AKA “shootout” presentations)  Formal, competitive presentations –solicits new clients –builds reputation of presenter –demonstrates skills and expertise  Define the problem for the client –might not have a unified idea of the problem –do not really know/recognize the problem  present the problem as they know it  then make a counter recommendation as to the real problem

6 Purpose of new business presentations  Persuade client that –Your project will meet their needs –That you are credible  can deliver on your promises –Under budget –On schedule

7 Cost of New Business Presentations  Costs mount- determine the budget for the presentation and stick to it.  Costs of Functional Prototype and presentation  5 employees  3 weeks to produce  40 hours week (conservative) 50 dollars/hour  (5emp)x(3x40hrs)x$50/hr=$30,000

8 Two types of Presentations-  New Business Presentations  Project Presentations

9 Project Presentations-  You’ve already landed client  Persuasive- Purpose –your project/solution to their problem  is sound and  meets the client’s needs  Begin with the basic information  Move quickly to persuasion  Focus- how the Project meets client’s needs

10 Questions to ask when creating a project presentation  Who is the decision maker?  On what basis will the decision be made?

11 Anticipate Resistance Points:  Resistance points are objections to new ideas –that possibly challenge the client’s current business practices –that possibly differs from the client’s understanding of the problem/market –that possibly challenge a key player’s power/position –that possibly infringes on the “turf” of a key player (for instance the marketing VP)  Tactfully deal with them –Acknowledge –Accommodate –Refute

12 Project Presentations usually have  An opening  A statement of position  A description of Strategy  A Media Rationale  A demonstration of the Creative  Supporting evidence for your argument  A plan for the Evaluation of the project’s effectiveness  An explanation/justification of the Budget  The closing that reinforces the argument

13 The opening-  Establishes tone  Establishes identity  Grabs attention

14 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

15 The statement of position-  sets the goals and objectives  identifies the problem  proposes a solution

16 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

17 Strategy-  Outlines the key strategy decisions such as –primary and secondary audiences –behavioral objectives

18 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

19 Media:  presents the media rationale  explains how media choice furthers goals and objectives of the client

20 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

21 Creative:  Presents the creative strategies of the project  Illustrates and explains project  emphasizes return on design –shows how project’s functions and features  maximize workflows  further behavioral objectives and goals  reinforces/creates client brand identity

22 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

23 Supporting evidence-  provides relevant data and research findings  logically developed justifications

24 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

25 Evaluation:  Presents proposals for evaluating the success of the project

26 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

27 Budget:  this section wraps up the costs for all aspects of the project  emphasizes return on design  explains/justifies cost overruns

28 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

29 The closing  summarizes benefits  restates benefits  reinforces purpose of presentation –to persuade client that the project will meet their needs

30 Basic Sections of a Project Presentation  The opening  The statement of position  Strategy  Media  Creative  Supporting evidence  Evaluation  Budget  The closing

31 Beginnings, Middles, and Endings  People more attentive at the beginning and ending  Beginnings –Introduce all key points  Endings –summarize key points  Middles –don’t introduce new points –for elaboration and discussion –Keep attention

32 Dramatic techniques to keep attention  Change of pace  Dynamic visuals  Little plays  Leading questions  Exaggerated statements for dramatic effect

33 Make your presentation-  A showcase for your project  Demonstrate it solving their problem or meeting their needs  Highlight specifics of project

34 Selecting and Planning Visuals  Use visuals throughout  Use visuals as signposts of your logic  Visualize key phrases, relationships, comparisons and numbers

35 Functions of visuals  Memorability  Reinforce logic  Key points- don’t just say “sales”- say “sales jump 17%”  Clarity- show them what you mean  Identity and image- show them who you are, make them remember you

36 Six Effective Visual Characteristics  Visibility  Legibility  Simplicity  Clarity  Correctness  CONTROL

37 Visibility  Check out the room beforehand  Kodak study  (assuming the screen correct height)  1/25 the height of the screen  60 inch tall screen x 1/25= 2 ½ inches projected  Or the low-tech route  visible from the back of the room you will use

38 Legibility  Use Sans Serif fonts Bold No more than two fonts per figure  Avoid Italics Underlining outlines shadows All Caps

39 Simplicity  One idea per visual

40 Clarity  The point of the graphic must remain clear.  Don’t cut out too much

41 Correctness  No typos  The same rules apply to presentation graphics as applies to resumes-  Mistakes take away from the ethos of the presenters

42 CONTROL  Control the visual  Make it do what you want it to, given the audience  Take it away from the audience so that they focus on you.

43 Six Effective Visual Characteristics  Visibility  Legibility  Simplicity  Clarity  Correctness  CONTROL

44 Forecasting and Summarizing  Can you remember the last points?  What is the most effective means?

45 Remember as well  Contrast  Repetition  Alignment  Proximity

46 Revelation and Release

47 Revelation  Start off on a blank slide  Reveal information- don’t let them read it ahead of you  Danger in giving out handouts before discussion  How will the audience use them?

48 Release  Forecast the end…in conclusion  Summarize your main points  Allow for feedback/questions  End on a blank slide

49 Equipment  What type of equipment  Always have a backup in another media  Check the media/room beforehand

50 Length of the presentation  try to have a graphic every minute  minutes of presentations  slides

51 Oral Nature of Presentations  Forecast and Summarize  Involve the Audience

52 Forecast and Summarize  Specific Advance Organizers  Summariesat strategic spots  Transitions  Repeat Memorable words

53 Involve the Audience  Refer to people, not to abstractions- Uncle Joe Stalin  Use interesting Facts, figures, and quotations

54 Use concrete information  “Think about how your audience will interact with the information, not how they should interact with it.”  Provide –examples –illustrations –little narratives –analogies

55 Summary- Oral Nature of Presentations  Forecast and Summarize  Involve the Audience

56 Questions?


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