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National Science Foundation Nanostructured Hydrides for Fuel Cells Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR 1231153 Outcome: Researchers at Rowan University.

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Presentation on theme: "National Science Foundation Nanostructured Hydrides for Fuel Cells Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR 1231153 Outcome: Researchers at Rowan University."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Science Foundation Nanostructured Hydrides for Fuel Cells Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR Outcome: Researchers at Rowan University provide experimental evidence for a low temperature (100 o C) single step reaction to hydrogen desorption from nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride. Impact: One of the technical barriers to reducing petroleum consumption, and green house gas emissions, is the development of efficient hydrogen storage for on-board vehicular applications. This nanohydride material has the potential to cut costs and improve safety by reducing temperatures needed for hydrogen delivery to the fuel cell. Explanation: Nanostructured hydrides exhibit faster kinetics of hydrogen desorption. Understanding the rate-limiting reaction steps is key to designing new hydride structures with lower desorption temperatures. These significant material discoveries are made possible by using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) to observe hydrogen dynamics and synchrotron X-ray scattering to observe size and structure. Nanostructuring of hydrides is a potentially breakthrough strategy to high performance fuel cell systems. Professor Tabbetha Dobbins, of Rowan’s Department of Physics & Astronomy and recipient of an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award. Prof. Dobbins next to the atmosphere controlled glovebox where nanostructured hydrides are prepared. (courtesy of Rowan University)

2 National Science Foundation Nanostructuring of hydrides is made possible by infiltration into Fe-BTC metal organic frameworks (MOFs) having a pore size of 2-5nm. The effect of nanostructuring on hydrogen mobility is examined using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). Graduate student Shathabish NaraseGowda measured nanoconfined NaAlH 4 and observed 20% H atoms showing long range hydrogen mobility at 350K and 400K. This measurement provides direct evidence that nanostructuring improves long- range mobility of hydrogen at lower temperatures. The possibility for tunable hydrogen desorption temperature via morphology control is near. Nanostructuring reduces Temperature for Long Range Mobility of Hydrogen Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR Nanoconfined NaAlH 4 (in Fe-BTC) shows significant long-range hydrogen diffusion occurs at 350K – 400K as indicated by flat EISF dependence on Q. Data was collected on the Disk Chopper Spectrometer (DCS) instrument at NIST NCNR in collaboration with Craig Brown, Timothy Jenkins, and Madhusudan Tyagi. (Courtesy of T. Dobbins)

3 National Science Foundation Project ENERGY Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR Partnering with the Creating Higher Aspiration and Motivation Project (C.H.A.M.P.) and dual enrollment programs at Rowan U., “Project Energy” involved 6 high school students from Camden County, NJ. Students learned how green technologies are developed and what it means for society when those technologies enter the market place. The hydrogen fuel cell vehicle is used to introduce students to the idea of sustainability (water, as a fuel source, powers a car without harmful emissions). In addition to learning the STEM aspects of the technology, students learned about societal impacts. Most importantly, students gain self awareness. Kimberly Whitehead (Rowan U., Assoc. Dean) facilitated a discussion on “What is fueling your future?” which aided the students in connecting their own future goals with positive verbs (such as creating, doing, learning, planning). Demond Miller (Rowan U., Sociology) challenged the students to think about how they might participate in a sustainability-driven entrepreneurship venture. As a project outcome, students helped construct a website aimed at helping other youth to learn about sustainability and energy. Students met for 6 weeks to learn about alternative energy and to help construct a website aimed at helping youth learn about sustainability and energy: ProjectEnergy.net. (courtesy of Rowan University)

4 National Science Foundation International Undergraduate Student Collaboration Tabbetha Dobbins, Rowan University, DMR Undergraduate students Zachary Buck (Rowan U.) and Shotaro Chiba (Hokkaido U., Sappora, JAPAN) enjoyed a fruitful collaboration during their senior year in college. Zach and Shotaro each had the opportunity to visit the a laboratory abroad to perform research. Zach visited Hokkaido U. for 6 weeks from Feb-March 2012– while Shotaro visited Rowan U. for 6 weeks from March-April. With the overlapping weeks at Hokkaido and at Rowan- the students formed a collaboration and friendship. Both worked on thin films of Mg/Nb/Pd for hydrogen storage. This experience has taught the students the importance of forming international ties during undertaking the scientific research enterprise. Zach (left) and Shotaro (right) present their results at the Rowan U. STEM Symposium. (Courtesy of T. Dobbins) Both Students were featured in the Gloucester County Times. (Courtesy of Gloucester County Times.)


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