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Chapter 14 Chemical Kinetics Chemistry: The Central Science, 10th edition Theodore L. Brown, H. Eugene LeMay, Jr., and Bruce E. Bursten Todd Austell, The.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 14 Chemical Kinetics Chemistry: The Central Science, 10th edition Theodore L. Brown, H. Eugene LeMay, Jr., and Bruce E. Bursten Todd Austell, The."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 14 Chemical Kinetics Chemistry: The Central Science, 10th edition Theodore L. Brown, H. Eugene LeMay, Jr., and Bruce E. Bursten Todd Austell, The University of North Carolina  2006, Pearson Prentice Hall

2 1.The effect of increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture depends on which side of the chemical equation has the most gas molecules. 2.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture has no effect on the rate of reaction if each reactant pressure is increased by the same amount. 3.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture increases the rate of reaction. 4.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture decreases the rate of reaction.

3 1.The effect of increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture depends on which side of the chemical equation has the most gas molecules. 2.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture has no effect on the rate of reaction if each reactant pressure is increased by the same amount. 3.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture increases the rate of reaction. 4.Increasing the partial pressures of the reactive components of a gaseous mixture decreases the rate of reaction.

4 1.Larger triangles should be used if x and y values are three significant figures or more. 2.The size of the triangle is mostly a matter of convenience; different size triangles give the same ratio (slope). 3.The size of the triangle determines the number of significant digits in your final slope calculation. 4.Smaller triangles should be used only near the ends of the curve while larger triangles are used in the center only.

5 1.Larger triangles should be used if x and y values are three significant figures or more. 2.The size of the triangle is mostly a matter of convenience; different size triangles give the same ratio (slope). 3.The size of the triangle determines the number of significant digits in your final slope calculation. 4.Smaller triangles should be used only near the ends of the curve while larger triangles are used in the center only.

6 a. 1.The rate law for any chemical reaction is the equation that relates concentrations of reactants to the rate of reaction. 2.The rate law for a reaction describes the mechanism for a reaction in detail. 3.The rate law for a reaction determines the conditions under which a reaction will occur. 4.The rate law for a reaction can be used to determine the concentrations of reactants for a reaction at any given time.

7 a. 1.The rate law for any chemical reaction is the equation that relates concentrations of reactants to the rate of reaction. 2.The rate law for a reaction describes the mechanism for a reaction in detail. 3.The rate law for a reaction determines the conditions under which a reaction will occur. 4.The rate law for a reaction can be used to determine the concentrations of reactants for a reaction at any given time.

8 b. 1. k in any rate law is equilibrium constant for the reaction. 2. k in any rate law is the proportionality constant. 3. k in any rate law represents the order of the reaction. 4. k in any rate law is the rate constant.

9 b. 1. k in any rate law is equilibrium constant for the reaction. 2. k in any rate law is the proportionality constant. 3. k in any rate law represents the order of the reaction. 4. k in any rate law is the rate constant.

10 a. 1.2 nd order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 2 nd order overall. 2.2 nd order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 3 rd order overall. 3.1 st order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 2 nd order overall. 4.1 st order in NO, 2 nd order in H 2, 3 rd order overall.

11 a. 1.2 nd order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 2 nd order overall. 2.2 nd order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 3 rd order overall. 3.1 st order in NO, 1 st order in H 2, 2 nd order overall. 4.1 st order in NO, 2 nd order in H 2, 3 rd order overall.

12 b. 1.Yes 2.No

13 b. 1.Yes 2.No

14 a. 1.The initial concentration of CH 3 NC 2.The initial pressure of CH 3 NC 3.The initial concentration of products 4.The initial rate of reaction

15 a. 1.The initial concentration of CH 3 NC 2.The initial pressure of CH 3 NC 3.The initial concentration of products 4.The initial rate of reaction

16 b. 1.The initial rate of reaction 2.The initial pressure of CH 3 NC 3.The natural logarithm of the initial pressure of CH 3 NC 4.The natural logarithm of the initial concentration of CH 3 NC

17 b. 1.The initial rate of reaction 2.The initial pressure of CH 3 NC 3.The natural logarithm of the initial pressure of CH 3 NC 4.The natural logarithm of the initial concentration of CH 3 NC

18 1.The half-life does not change as the reaction proceeds. 2.The half-life increases as the reaction proceeds. 3.The half-life decreases as the reaction proceeds. 4.The half-life increases for some reactions and decreases for other (2 nd order reactions) as the reaction proceeds.

19 1.The half-life does not change as the reaction proceeds. 2.The half-life increases as the reaction proceeds. 3.The half-life decreases as the reaction proceeds. 4.The half-life increases for some reactions and decreases for other (2 nd order reactions) as the reaction proceeds.

20 1.Molecules react at rates proportional to their temperatures. 2.Molecules all have the same average kinetic energy when they react. 3.Molecules are moving very fast prior to reacting. 4.Molecules must collide in order to react.

21 1.Molecules react at rates proportional to their temperatures. 2.Molecules all have the same average kinetic energy when they react. 3.Molecules are moving very fast prior to reacting. 4.Molecules must collide in order to react.

22 1.Molecules often collide at only low energies, preventing a reaction from taking place. 2.Molecules often bind to each other, preventing reaction with other molecules. 3.Molecules must also collide both with the proper orientation and with sufficient energy to react. 4.Molecular energies are sometimes too high for reactions to take place.

23 1.Molecules often collide at only low energies, preventing a reaction from taking place. 2.Molecules often bind to each other, preventing reaction with other molecules. 3.Molecules must also collide both with the proper orientation and with sufficient energy to react. 4.Molecular energies are sometimes too high for reactions to take place.

24 1.bimolecular 2.dimolecular 3.termolecular 4.unimolecular

25 1.bimolecular 2.dimolecular 3.termolecular 4.unimolecular

26 1.All reactions are not elementary. 2.Some information must be known about the rate constant to determine the rate law. 3.Concentrations of reactant must be known to determine the rate law. 4.The rate law depends not on the overall reaction, but on the slowest step in the mechanism.

27 1.All reactions are not elementary. 2.Some information must be known about the rate constant to determine the rate law. 3.Concentrations of reactant must be known to determine the rate law. 4.The rate law depends not on the overall reaction, but on the slowest step in the mechanism.

28 1.by lowering the  H for the reaction 2.by lowering the activation energy by providing a lower energy pathway (different mechanism) for the reaction 3.by lowering the product energy 4.by lowering the reactant energy

29 1.by lowering the  H for the reaction 2.by lowering the activation energy by providing a lower energy pathway (different mechanism) for the reaction 3.by lowering the product energy 4.by lowering the reactant energy

30 a. 1.sweet spot 2.hot spot 3.active site 4.binding site

31 a. 1.sweet spot 2.hot spot 3.active site 4.binding site

32 b. 1.receptor 2.substrate 3.antigen 4.catalyst

33 b. 1.receptor 2.substrate 3.antigen 4.catalyst


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