Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Thais Russomano MD PhD John Ernsting MBBS PhD Subhajit Sarkar MRCS Lisa Evetts RGN João Castro MD Microgravity Laboratory, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Thais Russomano MD PhD John Ernsting MBBS PhD Subhajit Sarkar MRCS Lisa Evetts RGN João Castro MD Microgravity Laboratory, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, Brazil."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Thais Russomano MD PhD John Ernsting MBBS PhD Subhajit Sarkar MRCS Lisa Evetts RGN João Castro MD Microgravity Laboratory, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Human Physiology and Aerospace Medicine Group, King’s College London. CPR in Microgravity Simon N Evetts PhD Non-terrestrial Basic Life Support Simon N Evetts PhD

3 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.

4 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.  Basic Life Support;

5 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.  Basic Life Support; –Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation without equipment or other resources.

6 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.  Basic Life Support; –Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation without equipment or other resources.

7 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.  Basic Life Support; –Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation without equipment or other resources.  Single rescuer, not multiple care-giver.

8 Introduction  Non-terrestrial as opposed to microgravity.  Basic Life Support; –Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation without equipment or other resources.  Single rescuer, not multiple care-giver.  Emphasis on chest compression, mouth-to- mouth ventilation secondary consideration.

9 The Space Environment  Space exploration is inherently dangerous.

10 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

11 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

12 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

13 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

14 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

15 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

16 Significant Space Related Medical Occurrences YearMissionNationEvent 1967Soyuz 1USSRSpacecraft crashed – 1 death 1967Apollo 1USCommand module fire – 3 deaths 1969Apollo 11USType 1 decompression sickness 1970Apollo 13USUrinary tract infection 1971Soyuz 11USSRDepressurization – 3 deaths 1971Apollo 15USArrhythmia during lunar EVA 1975Apollo 18USNitrogen tetroxide pneumonitis 1985Salyut 7USSRProstatis and sepsis 1985Salyut 7USSRHypothermia 1986ChallengerUSSpacecraft exploded - 7 deaths 1987MirRussiaArrhythmia requiring evacuation 1997MirRussiaDepressurization after collision 1997MirRussiaToxic atmosphere after fire 2003ColumbiaUSSpacecraft disintegrated – 7 deaths

17 Pulseless victim  The Space Medicine Configuration Control Board of NASA has approved a list of 442 medical conditions (the Patient Condition Database) that appear possible during long duration spaceflight on the ISS.

18 Pulseless victim  The Space Medicine Configuration Control Board of NASA has approved a list of 442 medical conditions (the Patient Condition Database) that appear possible during long duration spaceflight on the ISS.  Of these conditions 106 (24 %) are classified as “critical” requiring use of critical care procedures.

19 Pulseless victim  The Space Medicine Configuration Control Board of NASA has approved a list of 442 medical conditions (the Patient Condition Database) that appear possible during long duration spaceflight on the ISS.  Of these conditions 106 (24 %) are classified as “critical” requiring use of critical care procedures.  …including cardiac conditions (e.g. myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and asystole),

20 Pulseless victim  The Space Medicine Configuration Control Board of NASA has approved a list of 442 medical conditions (the Patient Condition Database) that appear possible during long duration spaceflight on the ISS.  Of these conditions 106 (24 %) are classified as “critical” requiring use of critical care procedures.  …including cardiac conditions (e.g. myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and asystole),  …and respiratory conditions (e.g. acute airway obstruction, laryngeal oedema from anaphylaxis and inhalation injuries).

21 Pulseless victim  It has been estimated that the risk to an ISS crew member of developing a serious medical condition requiring medical evacuation is 6% per year*, * Johnston, S. L., Marshburn, T. H., and Lindgren, K., Predicted Incidence of Evacuation-Level Illness/Injury During Space Station Operation. 71st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Texas. May 2000.

22 Pulseless victim  It has been estimated that the risk to an ISS crew member of developing a serious medical condition requiring medical evacuation is 6% per year*,  … and 1% per year risk of a life-threatening condition*. * Johnston, S. L., Marshburn, T. H., and Lindgren, K., Predicted Incidence of Evacuation-Level Illness/Injury During Space Station Operation. 71st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Texas. May 2000.

23 Pulseless victim  It has been estimated that the risk to an ISS crew member of developing a serious medical condition requiring medical evacuation is 6% per year*,  … and 1% per year risk of a life-threatening condition*.  A figure of 0.15%/yr of CAD related event occurring in yr old flight personnel has been cited**. * Johnston, S. L., Marshburn, T. H., and Lindgren, K., Predicted Incidence of Evacuation-Level Illness/Injury During Space Station Operation. 71st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Texas. May ** Ball, C.G., Hamilton, D.R. and Kirkpatrick, A Primary prevention approach to mitigating cardiac risk in astronauts. 75th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Anchorage. May 2004.

24 Pulseless victim  As has the figure of 0.06 persons/year with regards to the risk of a healthy astronaut receiving a significant injury or developing a significant medical condition in space*. * Mukai, C. and Charles, J. B Psychological and medical challenges for Mars crew composition as considered against similar challenges faced by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. 75th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Anchorage. May 2004.

25 Pulseless victim  As has the figure of 0.06 persons/year with regards to the risk of a healthy astronaut receiving a significant injury or developing a significant medical condition in space*.  The potential for a serious medical incident resulting in a pulseless apneic state requiring intervention, therefore is real. * Mukai, C. and Charles, J. B Psychological and medical challenges for Mars crew composition as considered against similar challenges faced by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. 75th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Houston, Anchorage. May 2004.

26 Recent and current CPR guidelines (+1Gz)  European Resuscitation Council 1998: –Mouth-to-mouth ventilation requiring tidal volumes of 400 – 600 ml. –Chest compression depth of 40 – 50 mm. –Chest compression rate of ~ 100 compressions.min -1.

27 Recent and current CPR guidelines (+1Gz)  European Resuscitation Council 1998: –Mouth-to-mouth ventilation requiring tidal volumes of 400 – 600 ml. –Chest compression depth of 40 – 50 mm. –Chest compression rate of ~ 100 compressions.min -1.  European Resuscitation Council 2001: –Tidal volumes of 700 – 1000 ml. –Chest compression depth of 40 – 50 mm. –Chest compression rate in excess of 100 min -1.

28 +1Gz - Earth

29 93 kg person 76 kg person Chest Compression Depth According to Rescuer Body Weight Min required depth Big patient/low compliance chest Small patient/high compliance chest 41 kg person Force (N) Compression Depth (cm) Average compliance chest Earth Gravity 9.8 m.s -1

30 +0.16 Gz - The Moon

31

32 93 kg 76 kg 41 kg Lunar Gravity Compression Depth (cm) Force (N) Average compliance chest Chest Compression Depth According to Rescuer Body Weight Small patient/high compliance chest

33 +0.38 Gz - Mars

34

35 Spaceman Spiff wrestles with his Galactic Mk 3 Mars Lander, but what with muscle wastage, deconditioning and Martian death rays, the landing wasn’t looking too good!!

36 +0.38 Gz - Mars

37 93 kg 76 kg 41 kg Mars Gravity Compression Depth (cm) Force (N) Chest Compression Depth According to Rescuer Body Weight Small patient/high compliance chest Average compliance chest

38 On Earth On Mars On Moon Compression Depth (cm) Force (N) Mean Mass Rescuer – Mean Chest Compliance Patient 76 kg Rescuer

39 What can be done about off planet BLS?  Assisted CPR. –Using a restraint system.

40  Assisted CPR. –Using a restraint system. What can be done about off planet BLS?

41  Assisted CPR. –Using a restraint system. –Using assistance devices. What can be done about off planet BLS?

42  Assisted CPR. –Using a restraint system. –Using assistance devices. –Multiple person CPR. What can be done about off planet BLS?

43 Technique of compression EquipmentDescription StandardNilNormal terrestrial CPR method. Heimlich CPR Method NilRescuer behind patient, chest compression by elbow flexion. Abdominal compression NilAbdomen compressed to utilize pure abdominal pump mechanism. Mass momentum method NilDropping from a height provides potential energy. The force may be applied by the hands or the feet. What can be done about off planet BLS?

44 Technique of compression EquipmentDescription StandardNilNormal terrestrial CPR method. Heimlich CPR Method NilRescuer behind patient, chest compression by elbow flexion. Abdominal compression NilAbdomen compressed to utilize pure abdominal pump mechanism. Mass momentum method NilDropping from a height provides potential energy. The force may be applied by the hands or the feet. What can be done about off planet BLS?

45 Technique of compression EquipmentDescription StandardNilNormal terrestrial CPR method. Heimlich CPR Method (RBH) NilRescuer behind patient, chest compression by elbow flexion. Abdominal compression NilAbdomen compressed to utilize pure abdominal pump mechanism. Mass momentum method NilDropping from a height provides potential energy. The force may be applied by the hands or the feet. What can be done about off planet BLS?

46 Technique of compression EquipmentDescription StandardNilNormal terrestrial CPR method. Heimlich CPR Method NilRescuer behind patient, chest compression by elbow flexion. Abdominal compression NilAbdomen compressed to utilize pure abdominal pump mechanism. Mass momentum method NilDropping from a height provides potential energy. The force may be applied by the hands or the feet. What can be done about off planet BLS?

47 Technique of compression EquipmentDescription StandardNilNormal terrestrial CPR method. Heimlich CPR Method NilRescuer behind patient, chest compression by elbow flexion. Abdominal compression NilAbdomen compressed to utilize pure abdominal pump mechanism. Mass momentum method NilDropping from a height provides potential energy. The force may be applied by the hands or the feet. What can be done about off planet BLS?

48 ER MethodNilPatient thorax encircled by rescuer legs to enable additional force application through hip/knee flexion. Added massWeightsStandard method with added masses (e.g. on a weight belt). Assist deviceElastic compression assist device Large ‘elastic band’ placed around the patient’s back and over the rescuer’s shoulders/back provides additional force. Modified Hand-stand Method (HS) Opposing ‘walls’ approx 2m apart. Modification of the microgravity hand- stand method. What can be done about off planet BLS?

49 ER MethodNilPatient thorax encircled by rescuer legs to enable additional force application through hip/knee flexion Added massWeightsStandard method with added masses (e.g. on a weight belt). Assist deviceElastic compression assist device Large ‘elastic band’ placed around the patient’s back and over the rescuer’s shoulders/back provides additional force. Modified Hand-stand Method (HS) Opposing ‘walls’ approx 2m apart. Modification of the microgravity hand- stand method. What can be done about off planet BLS?

50 ER MethodNilPatient thorax encircled by rescuer legs to enable additional force application through hip/knee flexion Added massWeightsStandard method with added masses (e.g. on a weight belt). Assist deviceElastic compression assist device Large ‘elastic band’ placed around the patient’s back and over the rescuer’s shoulders/back provides additional force. Modified Hand-stand Method (HS) Opposing ‘walls’ approx 2m apart. Modification of the microgravity hand- stand method. What can be done about off planet BLS?

51 ER MethodNilPatient thorax encircled by rescuer legs to enable additional force application through hip/knee flexion Added massWeightsStandard method with added masses (e.g. on a weight belt). Assist deviceElastic compression assist device Large ‘elastic band’ placed around the patient’s back and over the rescuer’s shoulders/back provides additional force. Modified Hand-stand Method (HS) Opposing ‘walls’ approx 2m apart. Modification of the microgravity hand- stand method. What can be done about off planet BLS?

52 N.B. A major limitation of all microgravity BLS methods is the lack of back/neck/head support!

53 N.B. A major limitation of all microgravity BLS methods is the lack of back/neck/head support! A decision will need to be made as whether a potential back/neck injury poses a greater risk than not receiving adequate CPR.

54 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet? (Fly before we bound)

55 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?  Current unrestrained Basic Life Support methods.

56 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?  Current unrestrained Basic Life Support methods. –Hand stand method

57 Hand Stand method

58 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?  Current unrestrained Basic Life Support methods. –Hand stand method –Reverse bear-hug (Heimlich).

59 Reverse Bear-hug (Modified Heimlich).

60 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?  Current unrestrained Basic Life Support methods. –Hand stand method –Reverse bear-hug (Heimlich).  Limitations.

61 Lets Walk Before We Can Run  Can Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?  Current unrestrained Basic Life Support methods. –Hand stand method –Reverse bear-hug (Heimlich).  Limitations.  Can a method of CPR (with fewer limitations than current methods) be performed by anyone, anywhere when off planet?

62 King’s/PUCRS CPR in Microgravity Study

63 ER CPR method – chest compression potential.

64

65

66

67 ER method – ventilation potential.

68

69 Manikin trials.

70

71

72 Results Measure+1G Z Microgravity Chest Compressions Depth (mm)43.6 ± ± 1.03 Range (min-max, mm)40.4 – – 51.2 Rate (compressions.min -1 )97.1 ± ± 3.4 Percent correct (depth)90%60% n Tidal Volume Volume (ml)507.6 ± ± 50.4 Range (min-max, ml)423 – Percent correct87%69% n3032

73 Results Measure+1G Z Microgravity Chest Compressions Depth (mm)43.6 ± ± 1.03 Range (min-max, mm)40.4 – – 51.2 Rate (compressions.min -1 )97.1 ± ± 3.4 Percent correct (depth)90%60% n Tidal Volume Volume (ml)507.6 ± ± 50.4 Range (min-max, ml)423 – Percent correct87%69% n3032

74 Results Measure+1G Z Microgravity Chest Compressions Depth (mm)43.6 ± ± 1.03 Range (min-max, mm)40.4 – – 51.2 Rate (compressions.min -1 )97.1 ± 3.0 *80.2 ± 3.4 * Percent correct (depth)90%60% n Tidal Volume Volume (ml)507.6 ± ± 50.4 Range (min-max, ml)423 – Percent correct87%69% n3032 * P < 0.05

75 Results Measure+1G Z Microgravity Chest Compressions Depth (mm)43.6 ± ± 1.03 Range (min-max, mm)40.4 – – 51.2 Rate (compressions.min -1 )97.1 ± 3.0 *80.2 ± 3.4 * Percent correct (depth)90%60% n Tidal Volume Volume (ml)507.6 ± ± 50.4 Range (min-max, ml)423 – Percent correct87%69% n3032

76 Results Measure+1G Z Microgravity Chest Compressions Depth (mm)43.6 ± ± 1.03 Range (min-max, mm)40.4 – – 51.2 Rate (compressions.min -1 )97.1 ± 3.0 *80.2 ± 3.4 * Percent correct (depth)90%60% n Tidal Volume Volume (ml)507.6 ± ± 50.4 Range (min-max, ml)423 – Percent correct87%69% n3032

77 Discussion  Reasons for insufficient rate of chest compression and greater variation of measures in microgravity.

78 Discussion  Reasons for insufficient rate of chest compression and greater variation of measures in microgravity. – Novelty of environment.

79 Discussion  Reasons for insufficient rate of chest compression and greater variation of measures in microgravity. – Novelty of environment. – Variable acceleration forces and shortness of microgravity exposure.

80 Discussion  Reasons for insufficient rate of chest compression and greater variation of measures in microgravity. – Novelty of environment. – Variable acceleration forces and shortness of microgravity exposure. – Use of +1Gz manikin (albeit adapted for microgravity use).

81  ER compared to other methods of performing CPR in microgravity. Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

82 Jay, Lee, Goldsmith, Battat, Maurer and Suner, CPR effectiveness in microgravity: Comparisons of thee positions and a mechanical device. Aviat Space Environ Med, 74(11): Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

83 Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

84 Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

85 Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

86 Discussion MeasureERHand Stand Rev Bear Hug ERC 98 Guidelines Chest Comp Depth (mm) 41.3 ± ± ± – 50 Chest Comp Rate (per min) 80.2 ± ± ± 4.1 ~ 100 Tidal Volume (ml)491 ±

87  Effectiveness of the ER method for all populations will need to be ascertained before it can be considered a viable method for universal use. Discussion

88  Effectiveness of the ER method for all populations will need to be ascertained before it can be considered a viable method for universal use. Discussion – Strength – Anthropometric indices – Cardiovascular fitness

89  Effectiveness of the ER method for all populations will need to be ascertained before it can be considered a viable method for universal use. –Strength –Anthropometric indices –Cardiovascular fitness  Indications are that ER CPR should be possible for almost anyone, anywhere off planet. Discussion

90  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? Conclusion

91  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). Conclusion

92  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). Large habitat, no immediate access to equipment and requirement to conduct CPR for mins not secs. Conclusion ER CPR

93  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). Large habitat, no immediate access to equipment and requirement to conduct CPR for mins not secs. Conclusion ER CPR Large habitat, access to appropriate equipment e.g. CPR assist band, compression assist device. Assisted methods

94  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). Large habitat, no immediate access to equipment and requirement to conduct CPR for mins not secs. Conclusion ER CPR Small habitat, no immediate access to equipment and requirement to conduct CPR for hours not mins. HS CPR Large habitat, access to appropriate equipment e.g. CPR assist band, compression assist device. Assisted methods

95  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). – On planet (within habitat). Conclusion

96  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). – On planet (within habitat). Gravity greater than +0.5Gz. Conclusion Conventional CPR ?

97  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). – On planet (within habitat). Gravity greater than +0.5Gz. Conclusion Conventional CPR ? Gravity less than +0.5Gz, large habitat, no immediate access to equipment. ER CPR

98  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). – On planet (within habitat). Gravity greater than +0.5Gz. Conclusion Conventional CPR ? Gravity less than +0.5Gz, large habitat, no immediate access to equipment. Assisted methods ER CPR Gravity less than +0.5Gz, large habitat, access to appropriate equipment.

99  Non-terrestrial CPR - will one size fit all? –Off planet (no artificial gravity). – On planet (within habitat). Gravity greater than +0.5Gz. Conclusion Conventional CPR ? Gravity less than +0.5Gz, small habitat, no immediate access to equipment, CPR required for hours not mins. Gravity less than +0.5Gz, large habitat, no immediate access to equipment. Assisted methods ER CPR HS CPR Gravity less than +0.5Gz, large habitat, access to appropriate equipment.

100  Train in multiple CPR techniques? Conclusion Conventional CPR Assisted methods ER CPR HS CPR

101  Train in multiple CPR techniques?  Mission oriented training. Conclusion Conventional CPR Assisted methods ER CPR HS CPR

102  Train in multiple CPR techniques?  Mission oriented training. –CPR techniques appropriate for habitat and risks according to mission tasks. Conclusion Conventional CPR Assisted methods ER CPR HS CPR

103  Train in multiple CPR techniques?  Mission oriented training. –CPR techniques appropriate for habitat and risks according to mission tasks.  Foreseeable future will probably require 1 or 2 methods to be learnt for each mission. Conclusion Conventional CPR Assisted methods ER CPR HS CPR

104 Thank you for your time Any questions?

105 address


Download ppt "Thais Russomano MD PhD John Ernsting MBBS PhD Subhajit Sarkar MRCS Lisa Evetts RGN João Castro MD Microgravity Laboratory, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, Brazil."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google