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Accurate scaling requires mechanistic understanding: using experimental manipulations and tractable models as a testing ground for improving global land.

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Presentation on theme: "Accurate scaling requires mechanistic understanding: using experimental manipulations and tractable models as a testing ground for improving global land."— Presentation transcript:

1 Accurate scaling requires mechanistic understanding: using experimental manipulations and tractable models as a testing ground for improving global land models Caroline Farrior, Princeton University CLIMMANI/INTERFACE Conference, Czech Republic 5 June 2013

2 CO 2 fertilization experiments: Leaf level effects consistent Ainsworth and Long (2005) meta-analysis of 15 years of FACE experiments Light saturated CO 2 uptake (photosynthetic efficiency) Instantaneous transpiration efficiency (leaf-level water-use efficiency) Duke FACE

3 Stand level predictions from leaf level responses. Leaf level response: CO 2  Increased leaf-level water use efficiency (WUE) Increased WUE only increases productivity if plants are water limited. Stand-level prediction: Places or years with greater water stress should have stronger responses to enhanced CO 2.

4 Extrapolation of leaf level effects does not explain FACE (Free Air CO 2 Enrichment) results Duke FACE, McCarthy et al Water availability Ambient CO 2 Enhanced CO 2 Water availability CO 2 effect Similar results in other FACE experiments (Norby et al (review)) Ambient CO 2 Enhanced CO 2 CO 2 effect

5 What are we missing?

6 Fine roots (R) Leaves (L) Woody biomass (W) ~1 year ~100 years ~ 2 years Changes in allocation patterns have large effects on carbon storage Residence time Individual allocation patterns

7 Individual trees Leaves Woody biomass Fine roots Simplified plant physiology Z, W, S all grow allometrically with diameter. Diameter growth rate = f(resource availability, l, r )

8 CO 2 Water Nitrogen Water N Leaves Woody biomass Fine roots Simplified plant physiology Nitrogen uptake Water uptake Carbon assimilation Water-saturated plant Water-limited plant

9 Simplified plant physiology: carbon conservation Tissue respiration, maintenance and growth Investment in reproduction Water uptake Carbon assimilation Water-saturated plant Water-limited plant Nitrogen uptake

10 Sparsely rooted plants Competition for water and nitrogen. Uptake depends on community root density Nitrogen Water Densely rooted plants

11 Competition for light: forest dynamics model Purves et al. 2007, Strigul et al Canopy individuals in full sun Understory individuals in the shade The perfect plasticity approximation This simplicity allows analytical predictions Individuals are good at foraging horizontally for light

12 Light level constant. Nitrogen mineralization rate constant. Rainfall variable. Environmental conditions Day of the growing season Rainfall Rainfall while water limited Time in water saturation Note: This abstraction is analogous to a model with stochastic rainfall (Farrior, Rodriguez-Iturbe, Pacala in prep). Water saturation level

13 Individual properties Growth rates = f(allocation, resource availability) Mortality Fecundity Stand level properties Height of canopy closure (Z*) Expected lifetime reproductive success (LRS, fitness) PPA Population dynamics

14 Allocation strategy (e.g.: allocation to fine roots) Allocation strategy (e.g.: allocation to fine roots) 1 Resident strategy Competitive dominant/ Evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) Successful invaders Predicting the dominant allocation strategy: Evolutionarily Stable Strategy (ESS) Expected lifetime reproductive success (LRS) of invader in monoculture of the resident ESS – a strategy that when in monoculture prevents invasion by all other strategies

15 Nitrogen-limited plants Competitive (ESS) allocation strategies Dybzinski et al. AmNat 2011 N

16 Water-limited plants Competitive (ESS) allocation strategies Time in water saturation Water available during water limitation Farrior et al. AmNat 2013 W

17 Dybzinski et al Farrior et al Nitrogen limitation Water limitation Comparisons to data – Fluxnet sites across the globe

18 Application to CO 2 fertilization

19 ESS allocation example: N-limited plant N Root cost (gC/year) Competitive dominant (ESS) Leaf productivity (gC/year) More roots Holds leaves more costly than they are worth Less roots Missing productive leaves Competitive, nitrogen-limited plants invest in fine roots at a level that cancels the productivity of the least productive leaf.

20 LRS of invader in monoculture of the resident. +CO 2 ESSNew ESS Plant response Resident strategy Invading strategy Enhanced [CO 2 ] perturbs the environment, changing the competitive landscape and the ESS

21 +CO 2 (photosynthetic efficiency) New ESS Immediate Plant Response Plant level responses to enhanced [CO 2 ]: N-limited plants ESS Root cost (gC/year) Leaf benefit (gC/year) N Dybzinski et al. In Prep CO2 fertilization in nitrogen-limited plants promotes growth of fine-root and woody biomass.

22 ESS New ESS If plants are water limited, when CO 2 is added, if there is a productivity response, it is due to the increase in water use efficiency. With this increase, competitive plants increase fine-root biomass but there is no increase in biomass allocated to wood (yellow – brown area). New ESS Plant level responses to enhanced [CO 2 ]: Water-limited plants +CO 2 (leaf-level water use efficiency) Immediate Plant Response W CO 2 fertilization in water-limited plants promotes growth of fine-roots biomass without increases in tree growth. Root cost (gC/year) Leaf benefit (gC/year) Farrior et al. 2013

23 Enhanced CO 2 for water and nitrogen limited plants lead to opposite effects on carbon sinks.

24 36, 32 species plots planted in 1994 (Cedar Creek, Dave Tilman) 4 years of factorial additions – Nitrogen (ambient, +7g/m 2 /yr +14g/m 2 /yr) – Water (ambient, ~double) Resource addition experiment Fine roots Coarse rootsFarrior et al. In Press Ecology

25 Leaves increase with N Roots increase with water addition but only at low N Roots decrease with N addition but only at high water * * Simple experiment yields some confusing results * Significant effect of the water treatment Farrior et al. In Press Ecology

26 Grassland model of competition for light, water, and nitrogen Individual plant CO 2 Water Nitrogen Allocation to reproduction, Measure of fitness Farrior et al. In Press Ecology

27 Nitrogen ESS +N New ESSPlant Response Root investment decreases with nitrogen addition because marginal returns of nitrogen uptake are negative. Effect of nitrogen addition on biomass allocation Root cost (gC/year) Leaf productivity (gC/year) N

28 Water ESSNew ESS Plant Response + water during water limitation Root cost Root investment increases with water addition because marginal returns of water uptake are constant. Effect of water addition on allocation Water-limited leaf productivity W

29 ESS root investment = + time in water saturationtime in water limitation water ESSnitrogen ESS * * ESS allocation to fine roots: a weighted average Explicit interaction between water and nitrogen  Nitrogen additions should have a greater effect at high water.  Effect of water additions should decrease with nitrogen level.

30 ESS allocation to fine roots: a weighted average * * Effect of water additions decrease with nitrogen additions because the nitrogen limitation strategy becomes more important with water additions.

31 Experimental additions of nitrogen and water results consistent with a model where nitrogen-limited and water-limited plants respond in opposing ways to CO 2 fertilization.

32 Height-structured competition for light in a global land model Weng et al. In prep Shevliakova et al LM3V LM3/PPA

33 Predicting successional dynamics Weng et al. In prep Model Data

34 Current directions – Using ESS allocation strategies into forest tiles. – Including realistic rainfall regime (Farrior, Rodriguez- Iturbe, Pacala In Prep) To infinite diversity in a land model

35 In summary * * If possible, tractable models can make it easier to determine and test basic mechanisms and their importance. Climate crisis demanding of a young science Must make and improve predictive models At the same time, important to rebuild/reinvent the basis of these models. Scaling from small plots to landscapes and regions: what works, and what doesn't?

36 Collaborators Steve Pacala Ray Dybzinksi Simon Levin Dave Tilman Peter Reich Ensheng Wang Elena Shevliakova Sergey Malyshev Jeremy Lichstein Funding Sources Princeton Carbon Mitigation Initiative USDA Forest Service NSF Graduate Fellowship Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. Acknowledgements


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