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1 INEFFICIENT LAMP PHASE- OUT IN AUSTRALIA Presentation to Electrical Leaders Forum 26 August 2008 Bryan Douglas Chief Executive Officer Lighting Council.

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Presentation on theme: "1 INEFFICIENT LAMP PHASE- OUT IN AUSTRALIA Presentation to Electrical Leaders Forum 26 August 2008 Bryan Douglas Chief Executive Officer Lighting Council."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 INEFFICIENT LAMP PHASE- OUT IN AUSTRALIA Presentation to Electrical Leaders Forum 26 August 2008 Bryan Douglas Chief Executive Officer Lighting Council Australia

2 2 A few words about Lighting Council… Peak body for Australia’s lighting industry 56 member companies - luminaire manufacturers/suppliers - lamp suppliers - control gear manufacturers/suppliers - retailers Formed in 2001 (part of AEEMA) Incorporated as separate industry association November 2007

3 3 Lamp phase-out in Australia In February 2007 Australian Government announced its intention to phase-out inefficient lamps – few details provided Second Ministerial announcement on World Environment Day 2008 (June 5) Ban on import November 2008, ban on sale November 2009 Announcement supported by Lighting Council

4 4 Trends in Energy Consumption from Electrical Appliances Source: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

5 5 Scope of phase-out Phase-out of inefficient lighting will apply to most lamp types: Tungsten filament incandescent lamps (including GLS) Tungsten halogen – low voltage and mains voltage Reflector & non-reflector Candle lamps, fancy round lamps and other decorative lamps

6 6 Lamp phase-out in Australia Not technology specific - efficient incandescent lamps will be allowed Must result in lower power lamps - success will be measured by this Lamps will not be phased-out unless there is a more efficient and viable alternative available

7 7 Phase-out Curve Initial luminous flux (lumens) Initial efficacy (lm/W) Source: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

8 Phase 1: Enforcement date for importEnforcement date for sale Lamp products November 2008November 2009GLS ELV halogen non-reflector CFLs November 2009November 2010 >40W candle, fancy round, decorative lamps Mains voltage halogen non-reflector (G9 base excluded) ELV halogen reflector November 2010November 2011CFL, refector November 2011November 2012Mains voltage reflector lamps inc halogen (PAR, ER, R, etc) >25W candle, fancy round, decorative lamps To be determined – date dependent on availability of efficient replacement product To be determined – date dependent on availability of efficient replacement product Pilot lamps 25W and below

9 9 Phase 1 – Government’s expectations Conventional GLS lamps effectively eliminated from Australian marketplace Lower efficiency low voltage halogen lamps to be removed from market place High quality CFLs dominate Some halogen lamps remain

10 10 Measurement Standards Australian and New Zealand Interim Standards for incandescent lamps and CFLs have been published – Based on international work with the intent to migrate to IEC Standards when available Standards will be incorporated into state regulations which control what products can be sold in Australia and New Zealand

11 11 Measurement Standards The standards will also later specify product marking requirements. While these have yet to be finalised, they may include: - Statement of initial luminous flux, in lumens - Statement of initial efficacy, in lumens per Watt - Some details on size, attributes and location of marking on packaging

12 12 Issues 1.Negative perceptions of CFLs MEPS for CFLs specify quality requirements including: Start time Lifetime Lumen maintenance Power factor Colour (xy, CCT and CRI) Mercury level EMC

13 13 Issues 2.Mercury -Considerable international media attention on mercury in CFLs -Fails to recognise that linear fluorescents have been in operation for over 60 years -CFLs responsible for less mercury in environment because of their energy efficiency (burning coal releases mercury to atmosphere) -Hg quantity in modern CFLs very small – <5 mg (a single dental filling contains times more Hg) -Commonwealth Government study on Hg in lamps will conclude later this year -Calls for ban on Hg lamps in landfill

14 14 Issues 3.Other health concerns with CFLs -Flicker, UV light, migraines, EMFs -Government claims scientific evidence indicates none of these issues should be a barrier to the phase-out – ubiquity of linear fluorescents -Non-fluorescent alternatives available

15 15 Issues 4.Dimmed circuits -Most current generation CFLs not compatible with 2 wire control devices (compatible CFLs are available, but expensive) -Consumers likely to complain when CFL fails in dimming circuit -Government relying on education campaign

16 16 Future activities 2009 onwards Government will monitor lamp market to ensure no unintended outcomes (eg mains voltage halogen sales dominate CFLs) 2011 Review of options for Phase lumens/W target 2015 Phase 2 of incandescent MEPS – more stringent efficacy requirements eg 35 lumens/W Greenlight Australia v2 – blueprint for energy efficient lighting (likely to include MEPS for luminaires)

17 17 Thank you


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