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Abstract Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University Researchers from Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Presentation on theme: "Abstract Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University Researchers from Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Abstract Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University Researchers from Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology aim to develop self-reliant, self-powered microsystems for autonomous biophysical monitoring. These systems will be applied to the understanding of avian flight biology through the development of a “Lab-on-a-Bird”. As a part of this project, needle-type biosensors developed by Endo et al. [1] to detect glucose levels in fish were replicated. A working electrode was created using a platinum-iridium wire, and glucose oxidase was the enzyme used to coat the working electrode. A 650 mV potential was applied between the working electrode and the reference electrode (Ag/AgCl paste). The results obtained were comparable to the literature value. These sensors are currently being extended and modified so that they can detect the desired blood metabolites like uric acid in birds. Background and Motivation Acknowledgements & References [1] Endo, H. et. al. “Wireless enzyme sensor system for real-time monitoring of blood glucose levels in fish” Biosensors and Bioelectronics 24 (2009) [2] Endo, H. et. al. “Wireless monitoring of blood glucose levels in flatfish with a needle biosensor” Fish Sci 76 (2010) [3] Hoshi, T. et. al. “Amperometric uric acid sensors based on polyelectrode multilayer films” Talanta 61 (2003) Integrated Micro- and Nanofluidic Systems Laboratory 1 cm Amperometric Real Time In-Vivo Enzyme Sensors for Physiological Monitoring of Birds Abdurrahman Gumus Nipun Jasuja and David Erickson Experimental Results Engineering Learning Initiatives As sensors become increasingly small, miniaturization of the platforms that carry them into the environment has lagged behind. The primary impact of this project will be the development of an integrated and autonomous microsystem technology that can enable this. The second area of impact will be in avian biology. At present, almost nothing is known about changes in the biochemistry of individual birds over the course of their annual. Such devices could lead to an entirely new way of studying avian behavior. Red knot with solar geo-location transceiver Current Avian Monitoring RF tag. Tag shown here is similar to the one shown attached to the Red Knot Objectives Conclusion and Future Work Glucose Calibration Curve Methods: Sensor Fabrication Start with a platinum/iridium wire that is coated with Teflon The exposed Pt/Ir end is covered by nafion and then an enzyme membrane appropriate for the desired test. Solder lead wires to the Pt/Ir and Cu to connect to potentiometer Wrap the remaining Teflon in silver wire Strip the Teflon at one end Apply silver/silver chloride paste to copper wire Uric Acid Calibration Curve (with UOx enzyme) Needle type biosensors for amperometric measurement of glucose and were successfully fabricated. Initial results from sensors modified for amperometric measurement of uric acid are also positive. We are currently working on improving our design for uric acid sensors and integrating the sensors with microcontrollers and electronics to effectively store and transmit data. Efforts will then be made towards the fabrication of a nanowire based metabolite sensor. Fabricate and modify glucose-detecting biosensors developed by Endo et al. [1, 2] Extend the number of metabolites which can be detected to include uric acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate Develop a microfabrication compatible nanowire based sensor system which can increase the sensitivity of current devices. A 650 mV potential (vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied by the potentiostat to the Pt/Ir working electrode for the amperometric uric acid measurement Uricase catalyses uric acid as follows: Uric Acid + O 2 Gluconic Acid + H 2 O 2 Hydrogen Peroxide is reduced on the surface when the potential is applied: H 2 O 2 O 2 + 2H + +2e - Uricase Potential Methods: Uric Acid Sensor Chemistry Sensor Schematic Electrode under SEM Uric Acid Calibration Curve (without enzyme)


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