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1 PRESENTATION TO SELECT COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 2 INTRODUCTION The Free State Department of Education has been invited to present on the following :

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Presentation on theme: "1 PRESENTATION TO SELECT COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 2 INTRODUCTION The Free State Department of Education has been invited to present on the following :"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 PRESENTATION TO SELECT COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

2 2 INTRODUCTION The Free State Department of Education has been invited to present on the following : Overview of the performance of the department per programme An indication of challenges faced by the Department

3 3 Vision To be a Department that improves the quality of life of all Free State citizens by providing quality life-long education and training.

4 4 Mission To operate an efficient, effective, outcomes-based education system that works towards the overall development of Free State citizens in a dedicated, professional manner.

5 5 Values Uphold the Constitution Communicate effectively Re-dress past imbalances Manage Human Resources Interact with mutual respect Foster innovation and creativity Be professional and accountable Provide courteous, timely service Comply with the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

6 6 Free State Province

7 Schools statistical information DistrictNumber Of schools Number Of Educators Number of learners Motheo 3786,527192,912 Xhariep 1131,06930,087 Lejweleputswa 4085,247153,797 Thabo Mofutsanyana 6476,715202,976 Fezile Dabi 3763,996115,018 TOTAL ,554694,790

8 8 STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES PROGRAMME 1: ADMININSTRATION Programme objective: To provide overall management of the education system in accordance with the National Education Policy Act, the Public Finance Management Act, and other policies. PROGRAMME 2: PUBLIC ORDINARY SCHOOL EDUCATION Programme objective: To provide public ordinary education from Grades 1 to 12 in accordance with the South African Schools Act

9 9 STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES PROGRAMME 3: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL SUBSIDIES Programme objective: To support independent schools in accordance with the South African Schools Act PROGRAMME 4:PUBLIC SPECIAL SCHOOL EDUCATION Programme objective: To provide compulsory public compulsory public education in special schools in accordance with the South African Schools Act and White Paper 6 on Inclusive Education.

10 10 STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES PROGRAMME 5: FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING Programme objective: To provide Further Education and Training (FET) at public FET colleges in accordance with the Further Education and Training Act. PROGRAMME 6: ADULT BASIC EDUCATION AND TRAINING Programme objective: To provide Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) in accordance with the Adult Basic Education Act.

11 11 STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES PROGRAMME 7: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT Programme objective: To provide Early Childhood Education (ECD) at the Grade R and earlier levels in accordance with White Paper 5. PROGRAMME 8: AUXILIARY AND ASSOCIATED SERVICES Programme Objective: To provide the education institutions as a whole with training and support

12 SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMES ProgrammeSub-programme 1.Administration 1.Office of the MEC 2.Corporate Services 3.Education Management 4.Human Resource Development 2.Public Ordinary School Education 1.Public Primary Schools 2.Public Secondary Schools 3.Professional Services 4.Human Resource Development 5.In-school Sport and Culture 3. Independent School Subsidies 1.Primary Phase 2.Secondary Phase 4. public Special School Education 1.Schools 2.Professional Services 3.Human Resource Development 4.In-school Sport and Culture

13 SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMES ProgrammeSub-programme 5.Further Education and Training 1.Public Institutions 2.Youth Colleges 3.Professional Services 4.Human Resource Development 5.In-college Sport and Culture 6.Adult Basic Education and Training 1.Public Centres 2.Subsidies to Private Centres 3.Professional Services 4.Human Resource Development 7.Early Childhood Development 1.Grade R in Public Schools 2.Grade R in Community Centres 3.Pre-grade R 4.Professional Services 5.Human Resource Development 8.Auxiliary and Associated Services 1.Payments to SETA 2.Conditional Grant Projects 3.Special Projects 4.External Examinations

14 PAST EXPENDITURE TRENDS BY PROGRAMME Programme2001/022002/032003/042004/052005/06 SEPT ’05 1. Administration79%95%97%96%41% 2. Public Ordinary School Education 97%98%99%95%47% 3. Independent Schools100% 66% 4. Public Special Schools99%94%100%99%48% 5. Further Education and Training Colleges 53%95% 100%43% 6. Adult Basic Education and Training 72%81%94%50%77% 7. Early Childhood Development89%93%86%93%39% 8. Auxiliary and Associated Services 87%90%83%88%56% 9. Theft and Losses Total Spent94%95%98%95%47%

15 15 PAST EXPENDITURE TRENDS BY PROGRAMME

16 Programme Total Allocation Actual Exp. June 2005 % Spent June 2005 Actual Exp. Sept % Spent Sept 2005 Programme 1: Administration 373,770 78,04721% 154,18041% Programme 2: Public Ordinary School Education 3,944, ,86124% 1,849,49447% Programme 3: Independent School Education 26,422 10,61940% 17,37166% Programme 4: Public Special School Education 148,973 35,58124% 71,61448% Programme 5: Further Education and Training 152,000 35,83224% 64,75743% Programme 6: Adult Basic Education 73,050 29,81741% 56,00477% Programme 7: Early Childhood Development 33,586 3,93612% 12,96839% Programme 8: Auxiliary and Associated Services 292,228 25,4859% 163,87556% Programme 9: Theft and Losses 4 4 Total 5,044,887 1,168,18223% 2,390,26747%

17 17 ACTUAL EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAMME AS AT 30 SEPT. 2005

18 18 Programme 2:Public Ordinary Schools LEARNER PASS RATE

19 Programme 2: Public Ordinary Schools BUILDING OF SCHOOLS - PROGRESS TypeNumber of Schools Class Rooms Contract Amount A. Schools under Execution19435R m B. New Schools (1 st Group)8169est. R 62.8m C. New Schools(2 nd Group)13323R m D. Additions under Execution1056R m E. Planned Additions19100R m F. Additional Flood Grant1533R 33.47m G. Incentives for Best Performing Schools in R 9.55m

20 20 SCHOOLS FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDING: R 31,6 MILLION 1. MINOR RENOVATIONS MAJOR RENOVATIONS27 3. FENCES15 TOTAL203 OTHER PROJECTS 1. PUSH BUTTONS10 2. SEPTIC TANKS10 3. CONVERSION OF PIT TOILETS (EDUCATORS)5 4. CONVERSION OF PIT TOLILETS (THABA -NCHU)10

21 21 SCHOOLS FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDING: R 31,6 MILLION OTHER PROJECTS (Continue) 5. NEW TOILETS5 6. RESOURCE CENTRES (BREBNER & KROONSTAD) 2 7. GREENPATCH HOSTEL2 8. ADMIN BLOCKS2 9. OTHER HOSTELS (Christian de wet & Jimmi Ro) 2 TOTAL48 GRAND TOTAL251

22 22 PROCUREMENT AND DELIVERY OF LTSM TO NON SECTION 21 SCHOOLS Quantities were issued to Publishers on 8 September 2005 About 40% has been received at the warehouses to date Stationery quantities were issued on the 22 September, and about 50% has been received at the Warehouses to date. Distribution to schools will commence on the 7 November Arrangements have been made with the Districts to get contact numbers of Educators or SGB members who will be receiving LTSM five days after the school had closed. The cooperation and the long standing mutual relationship between the Department and Publishers, Stationery Suppliers and Distributors, dedication and commitment of Book Packaging Officials is a guarantee that 100% LTSM will be distributed to all Non Section 21 Schools by the first day of school in January 2006.

23 23 NO FEE SCHOOLS FOR 2006 Amount allocated in 1 st quintile= R703 per learner Schools in quintile 1 will be persuaded to become no fee schools in 2006 Total budget for all the schools = R341million

24 NO FEE SCHOOLS QUINTILE 1 (Poorest) Type Number of schools Number of learners Percentage of learners Norms & Standard s target Farm94933,6755% Public286188,95429% Ex-Model C28360% Total1,237223,46534%33% QUINTILE 2 Type Number of schools Number of learners Percentage of learners Norms & Standard s target Farm1250% Public171131,50020% Ex-Model C22090% Total174131,73420%

25 25 Programme 4:Special Schools DistrictNumber Of schools Motheo 10 Xhariep 0 Lejweleputswa 4 Thabo Mofutsanyana 2 Fezile Dabi 3 TOTAL 19

26 26 The Nature of Learners at Special Schools Mentally mild – Athletics, Netball, Cricket and Rugby Intellectually severely impaired- Table Tennis, Netball, Football, Cross country, Athletics Physically disabled- Athletics, Swimming, Table Tennis, Cycling, Basketball The deaf-Athletics, Soccer, Netball and Swimming The visually impaired-Goal ball and Athletics Neurology handicapped-Athletics, Swimming, Netball and Football

27 27 PROGRAMME 5: REPORT ON FET Name of Insitution & Campuses No. Of Educators Number of Learners Flavius Mareka (3 Campuses) Maluti FET (8 campuses) Motheo (13 Campuses ) Goldfields (2 Campuses)

28 28 PROGRAMME 5: REPORT ON FET All these campuses offer the following fields: Agriculture Manufacturing, Engineering and Technology Physical Planning and Construction Business, Commerce and Management Studies (SMME) Physical, Mathematical, Computer and Life Science Services

29 29 PROGRAMME 6:ABET CENTRES Name of DistrictNo. of Centres No. of Centre Managers No. of Educators 1. Fezile Dabi Lejweleputswa Motheo Thabo Mofutsanyana Xhariep Total

30 30 PROGRAMME 7: EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT No. of ECD Practitioners285Community 5Free Standing 287School Based 250Flemish 60Learnership TOTAL887 No. of Beneficiaries7673Community 150Free Standing 8610School Based 6250Flemish TOTAL22687

31 PROGRAMME 8: LEARNER SUPPORT PROJECTS PROJECT Nutrition (NSNP); Hostels and Learner Transport [R million] DESCRIPTION2004/ /2006 Number of Farm School Learners in Hostels Learners benefiting from the NSNP Number of Vulnerable learners receiving food parcels Number of learners transported

32 32 Other projects Food Gardens 154 schools participate in all 5 districts Workshops held to capacitate schools Hot Meals 22 schools currently served learners are fed Cost implication = R5,576million

33 33 Other projects continued PARTNERSHIPS IN PLACE DepartmentArea of Co- operation AgricultureFood gardens, NSNP Social DevelopmentNSNP, Orphans HealthFood gardens, NSNP PWR&TLearner transport

34 34 EXAMINATIONS DescriptionNumber Fulltime centres 328 Part time centres 286 TOTAL614 Examiners96 Moderators53 Markers1600 Senior Markers196 Deputy chief markers 16 TOTAL1961 DescriptionNumber Full time learners Part time learners TOTAL43456

35 35 CONCLUSION The Free State Province is the second poorest province in the country. Sixty percent (60%) of schools are farm schools. Education plays a very important role in the Province’s socio- economic upliftment of communities. CHALLENGES FACED BY THE FREE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT To improve the overall literacy rate ( 69,2% in 1996) Implement National Quintiles to achieve equitable school funding to the poor communities Abolish school fees for the first two National Quintiles (Poorest quintiles) Strengthen the exemption policy To provide spaces in special schools/resource centres/full service schools in accordance with policy To implement Learner Support Programmes ( Hostel, Transport )

36 36 CONCLUSION (Continued) National School Nutrition Programme Feeding in public and farm schools Integrate all the related activities including E- learning Transforming the Further Education and Training (FET) sector Implementation of Early Childhood Development (ECD) in public schools in rural areas Expand ABET programmes and that ABET programmes support the Expanded Public Works Programme Revision of basic infrastructure at schools Improve the provision of Science and Technology programmes in schools

37 37 THANK YOU


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