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‘Service learning’ as part of the Lifelong Learning University (LLLU). The Leuphana Model Sonja Moissidis Presentation at the VALUE project conference.

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Presentation on theme: "‘Service learning’ as part of the Lifelong Learning University (LLLU). The Leuphana Model Sonja Moissidis Presentation at the VALUE project conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 ‘Service learning’ as part of the Lifelong Learning University (LLLU). The Leuphana Model Sonja Moissidis Presentation at the VALUE project conference 8-9 June 2011 in Ankara

2 Agenda 1.Background: societal demands 2.Barriers to volunteering 3.Volunteering and higher education 4.The VALUE project 5.The Leuphana model 6.Discussion

3 Background societal demands I ET 2020: Strategic objective 1: Making lifelong learning and mobility a reality (EC, 2009, p.2) Societal demands: The challenges posed by demographic change and the regular need to update and develop skills changing economic and social circumstances lifelong approach to learning needed education and training systems which are more responsive to change and more open to the wider world Implementing LLL: further progress with ongoing initiatives is still required, especially in implementing coherent and comprehensive lifelong learning strategies the establishment of more flexible learning pathways — including better transitions between the various education and training sectors, greater openness towards non-formal and informal learning, and increased transparency and recognition of learning outcomes Further efforts to promote adult learning, to increase the quality of guidance systems, to make learning more attractive in general — including through the development of new forms of learning and the use of new teaching and learning technologies 9 June 20113 Service learning as part of the LLLU

4 Background societal demands II In the European Union, almost 100 million citizens of all ages invest their time, talents and money to make a positive contribution to their community by volunteering in civil society organisations, youth clubs, hospitals, schools, in sport clubs, etc. For the Commission, volunteering is an active expression of civic participation which strengthens common European values such as solidarity and social cohesion. Volunteering also provides important learning opportunities, because involvement in voluntary activities can provide people with new skills and competences that can even improve their employability. (…) Goal: The Commission expects that the European Year of Volunteering will lead to an increase in volunteering and to greater awareness of its added value, and that it will highlight the link between voluntary engagement at local level and its significance in the wider European context. (European Year of Volunteering 2011 website) 4 Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

5 Barriers to Volunteering empirical findings levels of participation vary strongly in Europe (Plagnol & Huppert, 2009) – between countries – geographical regions – depend on age, social status and gender main barriers to volunteering are (Sundeen et al, 2007): – lack of time and other resources – lack of interest – not being asked – age – did not know how to get involved, lack of opportunities those interested in volunteering said the main incentives for taking up voluntary engagement would be (ibid.) – “being asked” – a match of skills and tasks (+possibility to receive a qualification) – information about opportunities – involvement of family or friends Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

6 Volunteering and higher education What can HE institutions do? Provide volunteering opportunities included in the curriculum – for all learners, independent of their course/programme, age, gender etc. – making time in the curriculum – friends will join together – avoiding the problem of „being asked“, – creating interest with those not yet interested – … Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

7 Volunteering and higher education Why at HEIs? Higher education institutions (HEIs) are in particular responsible : – HEIs are training tomorrow’s leaders : university graduates have to be educated to handle the complexity of today’s society – requires fostering lifelong learning and acknowledging learning from all settings (formal, informal, non-formal) – HEIs must adapt to create spaces and “powerful learning environments” (Dochy et al, 2003) – HEIs need to partner with communities and integrate voluntary engagement into the curriculum  But how can this be achieved? Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

8 VALUE Grundtvig Network 2008-2011 Volunteering and Lifelong Learning in Universities In Europe http://www.valuenetwork.org.uk VALUE Grundtvig Network 2008-2011 Volunteering and Lifelong Learning in Universities In Europe http://www.valuenetwork.org.uk Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

9 About the VALUE project Framework: funded by the European Commission running from 2008-2011 Final dissemination conference in Ankara, 8-9 June, 2011 Partners: Lead by Liverpool University, UK comprising 20 partners from 13 countries Goals: facilitating cooperation between the two sectors for the delivery of University Lifelong Learning (ULLL) identification of good-practice models and the sharing of innovative approaches Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

10 EUA Charter for Lifelong Learning (2008) So what characterises a Lifelong Learning University (LLLU)? 1.Embedding concepts of widening access and lifelong learning into each university’s institutional strategy 2.Providing education and learning to a diversified student population 3.Adapting study programmes to ensure that they are designed to widen participation and attract returning adult learners 4.Providing appropriate guidance and counselling services 5.Recognising prior learning 6.Embracing lifelong learning in quality culture 7.Strengthening the relationship between research, teaching and innovation in a perspective of LLL 8.Consolidating reforms to promote a flexible and creative learning environment for all students 9.Developing partnerships at local, regional, national and international level to provide attractive and relevant programmes 10.Acting as role models of lifelong learning institutions Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

11 Volunteering and higher education “Service learning“ Volunteering in a higher education context is called “Service learning” combining academic seminar content (learning) with voluntary involvement (service) (Reinmuth, Saß & Lauble, 2007) providing opportunities for learners to become actively involved in social, economic or cultural development projects within their community or region while reflecting on their learning and receiving credit for their studies Service learning has been acclaimed as a way to add context to coursework and build concrete skills  Service learning is one integral part of the curriculum at Leuphana University of Lüneburg and should be a characteristic of a LLLU. Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

12 Effects of volunteering and service learning empirical findings I Reported positive effects (Wilson et al, 2008 and Leyba, 2010): positive developmental effects, especially for youth Benefits include enjoyment, self-esteem, increased belongingness, skill development and building a sense of community participants developed more protective and promotive factors such as self-esteem, friendships, confidence, positive relationships participants begin to view virtuous or altruistic behaviour as an important source of their self-worth can improve educational attitudes and performance Longitudinal studies have found that volunteering is beneficial to many aspects of well-being, social responsibility and identity development Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

13 Effects of volunteering and service learning empirical findings II Helps to avoid negative effects (Wilson et al, 2008 and Leyba, 2010): lower incidence of arrest substance use decrease in risk-taking behavior  The actual fact that students participate, not how long, has positive effects on ego development Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

14 14 Leuphana University An Institution for Lifelong Learning Overview founding year students in 2010 thereof professors employees in 2010 number of faculties 1946 6.700 152 820 4 total budget in 2010 approx. 72 Mio. Euro thereof faculty 471 1946 6.700 152 820 approx. 72 Mio. Euro 471

15 Leuphana University The university model ResearchCenter College GraduateSchoolProfessionalSchool UNIVERSITY MODEL Consecutive Master‘s degree and PhD programs High practical relevance and interdisciplinary field- orientation Facilitates knowledge and technology transfers Interfaces with external partners for cooperation and continuing studies for the educational needs of public/private organizations, NPOs/NGOs Holistic, trans- disciplinary concept of undergraduate education, Offers a unified first academic degree to all undergraduates Aims to strengthen personality and endow individuals with abilities of autonomous learning and skills to succeed in professional environments Balancing methodological rigor and practical relevance Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

16 Volunteering in the curriculum Core Concept of the Leuphana Bachelor Specialized Knowledge «Learning about» Personality Development «Learning to be» Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

17 Leuphana College Volunteering as an integral part of university studies (I) LEUPHANA BACHELOR MajorMinor Leuphana Semester Complementary Studies 654321654321 90 CP Sem. 30 CP CP = Credit Points Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

18 Leuphana College Volunteering as an integral part of university studies (I) LEUPHANA BACHELOR MajorMinor Leuphana Semester Complementary Studies 654321654321 90 CP Sem. 30 CP Work ethics and methodology for both team-oriented and autonomous settings Familiarity with an interdisciplinary perspective and multiple disciplines; Foreign language acquisition; Participiation in a practical (social) project CP = Credit Points Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

19 LEUPHANA GRADUATE SCHOOL 1 2 3 4 Leuphana Master doctoralstudies 1 2 3 4 5 6 Leuphana Promotion complementarystudies Fast Track Self-directed research work/ dissertation & disputation Master‘s programme 60 CP 105 CP 30 CP 15 CP Sem. Leuphana Graduate School Volunteering as an integral part of university studies (II) Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

20 Service learning at Leuphana included in the „complementary studies“ LEUPHANA BACHELOR COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES “Understanding & Change” humanities, social and cultural sciences “Project & Practice” entrepreneurial  minimum requirement: three of six perspectives  visible, close ties to community and region through focus on practical application  social learning as a fundamental component  each perspective requires the academic mastering of a subject, a topic or a problem “Art & Aesthetics” creative, reflexive, discursive “Technology & Environment” natural and technical sciences “Language & Culture” socio-linguistic, intercultural “Methods & Measuring” interdisciplinary, application-oriented Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

21 1."Linie 1" Young Musical –Project seminar  cooperation between Theater Lüneburg and the initiative Haute Culture e.V.  Students and theatre experts explore topics like marketing, drama, organisation, finances 2. Summer academy  Advisory support and work by students for lower secondary school pupils  Students learn about cognitive, social care, psychological, communication aspects and can choose school subject modules  Tutoring of school kids takes place during summer academy and counselling during one year 3. Volunteering and critical science  a seminar covers the theoretical background, political framework and practical relevance of volunteering and active citizenship 4. MBA Sustainability Management  Cooperation with blind people‘s museum „Dialogue in the dark“ 5. Lunatic Festival  Students organise a music festical in Lüneburg every year, experiences are reflected in seminars Service learning at Leuphana recent projects in complementary studies Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

22 Discussion How can volunteering embedded in HE studies foster the personality, skills and competencies development of students of all ages? How can HEIs and decision makers establish the right incentives to ensure real commitment and learning through volunteering if credit is awarded? How can service learning be implemented as part of a holistic LLL strategy? Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

23 References European Commission (2009). ET 2020 at http://eur- lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2009:119:0002:0010:EN:PDF European Commission (2010). European Year of Volunteering 2011 at http://ec.europa.eu/citizenship/focus/focus840_en.htm (last accessed 28 February 2011) European University Association (EUA) (2008). European Universities’ Charter on Lifelong Learning. Brussels: EUA. Euler, D. (2005). Forschendes Lernen. In: S. Spoun & W. Wunderlich (eds.). Studienziel Persönlichkeit. Beiträge zum Bildungsauftrag der Universität heute. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 253-271. Leyba, E. (2010). How Social Workers Integrate Service Opportunities into Multiple Elements of Practice. Children and Schools, 32(1), 27-49. Plagnol & Huppert (2009). Happy to help? Exploring factors associated with Variations in Rates of Volunteering Across Europe. Reinmuth, S., Saß, C. H. & Lauble S. (2007). Die Idee des Service Learning. In: A. M. Baltes, M. Hofer & A. Sliwka (eds.) Studierende übernehmen Verantwortung - Service Learning an deutschen Universitäten. Weinheim: Beltz, 13-28. Sundeen, R. A., Raskoff, S. A. & Garcia, M. C. (2007). Differences in Perceived Barriers to Volunteering to Formal Organizations: Lack of Time Versus Lack of Interest. Nonprofit management & Leadership, 17(3), 279-300 Thommen, J.-P. & Peterhoff, D. (2005). Instrumente der Persönlichkeitsentwicklung. In: S. Spoun & W. Wunderlich (eds.). Studienziel Persönlichkeit. Beiträge zum Bildungsauftrag der Universität heute. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 315-334. Wilson, A. E., Allen, J. W., Strahan, E. J. & Ethier, N. (2008). Getting involved: Testing the Effectiveness of a Volunteering Intervention on Young Adolescents’ Future Interventions. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 18(6), 630-637. Service learning as part of the LLLU 9 June 2011

24 Thank you very much for your attention. Leuphana University of Lüneburg Institute for Performance Management Wilschenbrucher Weg 84 · D - 21335 Lüneburg Phone +49.4131.677-7771 · Fax +49.4131.677-7982 sonja.moissidis@uni.leuphana.de www.leuphana.de/ipm


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