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Grant Writing Practicum for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Craig Zachlod, Ed.D. FEMA Higher Education Conference June 8, 2006 - Emmitsburg,

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Presentation on theme: "Grant Writing Practicum for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Craig Zachlod, Ed.D. FEMA Higher Education Conference June 8, 2006 - Emmitsburg,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Grant Writing Practicum for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Craig Zachlod, Ed.D. FEMA Higher Education Conference June 8, Emmitsburg, MD Copyright 2004, All rights reserved

2 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Evaluation and Assessment Component of Your Grant Competition for funds is increasing Accountability and assurances Create a way to assess your goals Qualitative and quantitative measurements Make assessment a part of your ongoing inventory Want more money? Do a good job.

3 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Ten Thoughts About Grants and Grant Writing Don’t be afraid–take on anything you know something about–Bbut care about what you take on. Build your case/based on our guidelines– why should we fund you? (KISS) Imagine it (your project) really happening and then write the story of how it happened as though you are a newspaper reporter; then change the tense. (Abstract) Look for grants that are appropriate to your project needs and guidelines that match. Use personal contacts and research to find and get grants.

4 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Ten Thoughts (continued) Partner for success. Every grantor wants outcome effectiveness, leveraged money and sustainability. Once awarded they do not want to take the money back. Show cost effectiveness and do a good job. Don’t be afraid of big numbers but know how to use the money effectively. Read the grant guidelines carefully and don’t put all your eggs in one basket–leave some wiggle room. Meet all deadlines including performance, evaluation and final reports.

5 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Always Seek Matching Resources In-kind contributions–even if not required Limitations on matching funding-Know ?. Assess resource commitments from your organization and from strategic partners to leverage matching funds (rents, phones, free lunch, mileage, etc.) Remind agencies they need to do this anyway–sometimes required by law.

6 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Promises, promises, promises Assurances You will do what you say you will do. The funds will be used appropriately. You will follow non-discrimination and drug-free workplace mandates. Financial Record Keeping Keep accurate financial records. Reports should match budget proposal.

7 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Impact and Social Effect How many people did you reach? What effect did the grant project have? Did you accomplish your stated goals? What worked and what did not work? How is the information or product being disseminated and with what effect? Structure your proposal to answer the above questions.

8 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Goals Increase your ability to raise money through grant and proposal writing. Way of creating innovative and cutting- edge projects

9 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Where do we find the money for our programs? What is Fundraising? What is a Grant?

10 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Where do we find the money for our programs? Fundraising is “Friend-raising.” Find prospects who care about your organization’s cause. The real purpose of fundraising is developing RELATIONSHIPS. People Give to People. Successful fundraising can be summed up in just three words... “Relationships, Relationships, Relationships”

11 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Where do we find the money for our programs? WHY IS BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS IMPORTANT? WHY IS BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS IMPORTANT? Partnerships are important because they illustrate to funding organization that your organization can: Build relationships Garner more resources Leverage grant dollars

12 The Simple Secret of Fundraising “Successful fundraising is the right person asking the right prospect for the right amount of funding to help the right project at the right time in the right way.” Source: FundClass Archive: The Fundraiser’s Toolbox, Topic #23. Facilitated by Sondra Delaripa

13 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Creating Strategic Partnerships Stakeholders as assets–buy in Broad-based community appeal Leverage limited resources Strategic advantages to donors Continuity

14 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Proposal Planning Steps Plan your work... work your plan Four Steps to Your organization’s Proposal Planning: Step 1 - Conduct a Needs Assessment Step 1 - Conduct a Needs Assessment Step 2 - Research and gather Data to support your organization’s proposal and/or program Step 2 - Research and gather Data to support your organization’s proposal and/or program Step 3 - Develop a Plan for your organization’s proposal (s) Step 3 - Develop a Plan for your organization’s proposal (s) Step 4 - Match your organization’s proposal with a potential Funding Source (s) Step 4 - Match your organization’s proposal with a potential Funding Source (s)

15 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Plan your work...work your plan Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment Ask the following questions for your Needs Assessment: What are your organization’s needs? What are your Community’s needs? What are the Funding Source(s) needs?

16 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment (continued) Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment (continued) Organization Needs Look for ideas for potential projects that your organization may consider Survey your organization’s managers for needs Community Needs Identify local issues Identify unmet needs

17 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment (continued) Step 1- Conduct a Needs Assessment (continued) Identify a Problem or Unmet Need that your organization can assist in solving or address Make a list of potential projects and/or programs for a proposal Prioritize your list

18 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Step 2 – Research and Gather Data to support your organization’s proposal and/or program Step 2 – Research and Gather Data to support your organization’s proposal and/or program Conduct a literature review Find statistical data-historical, current and future trends (internal and external) Provide documentation on human interest aspects

19 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising and Grant Writing Guidelines Step 3 - Develop a Plan for your organization’s proposal(s) Brainstorm each idea Use Mind Mapping for each program List potential resources, contacts, general outline, deliverables, timeline, draft budget Develop best business practices

20 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Fundraising Overview Steps to Organizational Success Readiness Assessment Determine Real Needs Comprehensive Planning SAP: Implement Plan Continuing Evaluation One-on-One with stakeholders Build sustainability Recognize need for change and adjustments

21 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Boards and Managers As Assets Boards of Directors Commitment Networks Authority Informed

22 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Informed Manager Managers Authority Resources Ownership Informed

23 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Granting Writing Workshops for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Credits to Renee Domingo Oakland Fire Department, Director of Emergency Management Two-day project development and grant writing workshops on request. Contact: Craig Zachlod Telephone

24 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Report on Region 1 USDOE ERCM Grant Funded October 1, 2005 ends March 31, months In progress since January 1, 2006

25 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Support provided to help schools prepare EOP and comply to NIMS $931,441 USDOE Public and private partners $ primarily for training and education as described and related materials and supplies Some funds for related supplies and surveys Some substitute reimbursement $

26 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Region 1 Grant Goals Upgrade and implement school emergency management plans so that they are SEMS and NIMS compliant in all schools. Establish new education and training programs for all stakeholder groups. Create a culture of improved community response through involvement and practice working closely with first responder groups. Bring schools to the table. Create and strengthen partnerships and communication among all stakeholders that will endure and be self-sustaining beyond the project period.

27 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Involve Strategic Partners and the “School Community” MCOE - Local Education Agency Five Region 1 Counties Past experience provides resources JPA Implementation Partners SSU / MCC - Higher Education Partners All First Responder and Stakeholder Groups

28 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved MENDOCINO COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Regional Project Administrator LAKE COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Administrative Coordinator Administrator HUMBOLDT COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Administrative Coordinator Administrator SONOMA COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Administrative Coordinator Administrator STATE OES COAST OES STATE POLICE STATE DHS DEL NORTE COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION Administrative Coordinator Administrator ORGANIZATIONS

29 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Deliverable Activities Clearly Defined on EM Model See Summary Sheets (Handout) MCOE Staff Training District/Teams

30 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Resource People The Key to Success Grant Project Implementation Team Project Director (Oversight - LEA) Loss Prevention Directors (JPA) Coordinators (4): Mendocino, Sonoma Humboldt-Del Norte and Lake Regional Administrative Assistant MCOE, County and District Superintendents External Project Evaluator/Mentor Area Expert Consultants (several) Strategic Partners Volunteers

31 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved District and School Emergency Plan: It’s the Law and Needed California Education and Legislative Codes Ed Code Sections , 32282, , Petris Bill Katz Bill Field Act State and Federal mandates (SEMS and NIMS)

32 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Prepared leadership county office, district and every school site Functional Emergency Plans Coordinated district plans and EM Teams Private school participation School site plans and trained EM Teams Improved communication Parent and student involvement (CERT & Teen SERT Personal Preparedness and Practice

33 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Plan for the worst. but, hope for the best. Are you prepared for the coming pandemic ? STOP

34 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Practical Steps for Identifying Appropriate Funding Sources FUNDING SOURCES Practical Steps for Identifying Appropriate Funding Sources WHERE DO WE FIND FUNDING FOR OUR PROGRAM? WHERE DO WE FIND FUNDING FOR OUR PROGRAM? What funding sources are available? Public Funding Sources Federal and State government sources Private Funding Sources Foundations, Corporations and Special Interest Groups

35 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Identifying Public Funding Search Federal Government directories for grant opportunities. Search for corresponding federal money in affiliated state agencies.

36 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Public Funding Resources Government funding includes the following resources: Advisory Services Asset Forfeiture Direct Loans In-kind Contributions Matching Grants Project Grants Surplus Property Training Programs

37 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Public Funding Sources Federal Agencies Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Energy Department of Health and Human Services Department of Homeland Security Department of Housing and Urban Development Department of the Interior Department of Justice Department of Labor Department of State Department of Transportation Department of Treasury Environmental Protection Agency Federal Emergency Management Agency General Services Administration National Science Foundation

38 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Public Funding Sources State Agencies California Department of Fish and Game California Department of Insurance California Integrated Waste Management Authority California Office of Emergency Services California Office of Traffic and Safety

39 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Partial List for Finding Government Funding Resources ( available in print) Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Commerce Business Daily Federal Domestic Assistance Information Federal Register Guide to Funding Alternatives for Fire and Emergency Medical Service Departments Free Money from the Federal Government; for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs: by Laurie Blum

40 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Partial List for Finding Government Funding Resources ( available on the Internet)

41 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Identifying Private Funding Sources Identify organizations that may have a vested interested in your program. Match up mission statements. Be able to justify in your proposal that there is no government or private venture capital to fund your funding request.

42 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Corporate Donors and Sponsors Community Social Responsibility Marketing Pet projects Employees Foundations In-kind

43 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Other Types of Fundraising Annual Fund Endowment Capital Campaign Events Major Donors

44 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding Sources Community Foundations Corporate Foundations Direct Corporate Giving Programs Independent Foundations Operating Foundations Special Purpose Foundations Grantmaking public charities Donor-advised funds Federated giving programs Religious funders Venture philanthropy

45 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding Source: Giving USA 2003/AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy

46 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding What is an Annual Fund? Endowment? Capital Campaign? What is an Annual Fund? Endowment? Capital Campaign? An Annual Fund is the primary fund raising method used by non-profits to raise money every year for operating support. An Endowment is a major donation that is invested by the non- profit organization and only the interest from the investment is used as part of their annual income. A Capital Campaign is when a non-profit organization finds a need to build a building, provide additional funding for program/service needs, create an endowment to fund building maintenance and/or programs, and any other funding needs that have not been met through regular fund raising.

47 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding To whom do foundations give grants? To whom do foundations give grants? 98% goes to Non-Profit Organizations- under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code 2% goes to Individuals- mostly in the form of scholarships and fellowships

48 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Foundation Research and Guidelines Know how much you need Know what you want to do Identify appropriate funding organization Letter of intent (LOI) Follow Grant Guidelines Tell them how your project fits their guidelines Don’t talk apples and oranges

49 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding- Foundation Giving Practices Source: The Foundation Center, 2002 Large FoundationsSmall Foundations Geographic PreferencesLocal, National, and International Local Giving ProgramsDefined Program InterestsGeneral Giving Decision-MakingBoard of Trustees StaffingStaffedLittle or no staff

50 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding What type of Non-Profit Organizations do Foundations support?

51 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding Source: Foundation Giving Trends, 2002 Edition/The Foundation

52 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Private Funding The Foundation Universe 56,582 Foundations Assets: More than $486 billon Geographic Distribution of Assets: -greatest in the Northeast, followed by West, Midwest and South Giving: $27.6 billion Largest Share of Grant Dollars: Education, Health, Human Services, and Arts & Culture Source: The Foundation Center, 2002

53 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Partial List for Finding Private Funding Resources ( available in print) Chronicle of Philanthropy Directory of Research Grants: Oryx Press Distance Learning Funding Sourcebook: Kendal/Hunt Publishing Company Foundation Grants Index: The Foundation Center National Data Book of Foundations: The Foundation Center

54 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Partial List for Finding Private Funding Resources ( available on the Internet)

55 II. Funding Sources- Research and Identification RECAP Questions and Answers

56 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved II. Funding Sources- Research and Identification Grant Seeking On-Line Two kinds of grant seekers online- HUNTERS AND GATHERERS Hunters Hunters target a specific project. Search is broad, target a few finds. Send Letter of Intent. Gatherers Gatherers target the organization’s specific mission. Bookmark a few key foundations or government funding agencies (5 to 20). Visit RFP sections regularly to get early jump on proposal submission.

57 ON-LINE ACTIVITY IDENTIFYING FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES IDENTIFYING SOURCES OF FUNDING; PRIVATE AND PUBLIC

58 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved II. Funding Sources- Research and Identification Now that you have identified potential public and private funding sources, now what? Make Contact! Face-to-Face, Phone Contact, Letter, Ask Questions Who and What type questions?

59 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Letter of Intent Precedes full proposal Often but not always required Follow their guidelines Must be clear and concise States your case (Case Statement) Who ? What? When? Where? Why? How much?

60 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved ASSIGNMENT/HOMEWORK Outline your proposal for an in-class presentation and group discussion tomorrow morning

61 Day 2 Grant Writing Practicum for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Day 2 SSU- School of Extended Education Craig Zachold, Ed. D. and Renee Domingo, MBA c copyright 2004, All rights reserved

62 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Day 2- Writing the Grant/Funding Proposal- Workshop Day FOCUS: Writing the Grant/Funding Proposal We will discuss: Proposal Writing Style and Format Proposal Structure Evaluating your Proposal

63 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved Day 2- Writing the Grant/Funding Proposal- Workshop Day Individual presentations- 5 minutes to present your organization’s proposal outline to the class

64 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission PROPOSAL STYLES Differences in applying for Government grants versus Foundation grants/funding Foundation Grants Submit a Letter of Intent or Inquiry Sample of Letter of Intent or Inquiry Class Activity Develop a Letter of Intent or Inquiry for the Zachlod and Domingo Foundation based upon the foundation grant funding interests letter hand-out

65 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission GENERAL PROPOSAL STYLE GENERAL PROPOSAL STYLE Your organization’s funding proposal can best be characterized as a “Marketing” proposal. The 4 Steps to Proposal Planning will help facilitate a well planned marketing strategy for your organization’s proposal. Your writing style will depend upon the type of funding request and from what type of organization you seek funding.

66 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF AN EFFECTIVE PROPOSAL INCLUDE: A clearly stated purpose-Why are is your organization seeking funds? A concise description of the problem or need- Provide statistical data and other supporting information, sources, etc. A detailed methodology to address the need or problem Measurable results- How will your organization measure the outcome or results? Ability to illustrate the uniqueness of your organization’s proposal-Why should your organization receive the grant funding?

67 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission Funding/Grant Proposal Format Funding/Grant Proposal Format Always read all the instructions, follow the directions and the Request for Proposal (RFP) or Grant Guidelines Format- Keep it Simple

68 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved FULL PROPOSAL STRUCTURE GUIDELINES III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission FULL PROPOSAL STRUCTURE GUIDELINES Cover Letter Title Page Table of Contents (When proposal is more than 5 pages) Executive Summary or Abstract Introduction Problem Statement, Background, History Purpose, Goals and Objectives Scope of Work Project/Program Methodology Timelines Measuring Outcomes/Results Budget and Cost-Benefit Analysis Future Funding/Sustainability Appendix

69 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission Proposal Evaluation prior to submission Proposal Evaluation prior to submission Did the proposal clearly demonstrate a need or problem? Did the organization describe a plan of action, with realistic timelines and budget? Does the organization have adequate resources to meet the proposed goals and objectives of the project/program? Will the organization establish partnerships as part of the program or project? Is there an evaluation plan to measure the outcomes? Is the proposal cost effective and are the benefits outlined?

70 Copyright 2006, all rights reserved FULL PROPOSAL STRUCTURE III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission FULL PROPOSAL STRUCTURE Sample Proposals that were successful Discussion

71 III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission Begin developing your organization’s full proposal

72 III.Grant/Proposal Development, Writing and Submission Homework: Guidelines and requirements for online work. Complete full proposal for discussion at next class session.

73 Day 2 Grant Writing Practicum for Emergency Services and Emergency Managers Day 2 QUESTIONS???? Adjournment


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