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Building our FCS Program Framework District FCS Meetings Winter 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Building our FCS Program Framework District FCS Meetings Winter 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building our FCS Program Framework District FCS Meetings Winter 2012

2 As we go through the process of Creating Our Future for Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service it is also time to be proactive with our FCS Extension Strategic Plan.

3 Think ahead to 2015

4  More complex needs and issues than ever before in the lives of the families we serve.  Changing landscape of priorities for funding at national, state, college, and county levels.  Accountability of tax dollars – scrutinized for cost effectiveness and building self-sufficiency. “Nanny State mentality affects you.” Ron Crouch

5  Be leaders in our subject matter expertise and our professionalism within the organization.  Communicate our passion and commitment to strengthening individual and families’ skill sets.  Be proactive to show accountability for our programs.  Take the initiative to leverage revenue streams. Think return on investment.

6 Celebrate our strengths as a FCS Extension profession Discuss strategies for using our FCS Strategic Plan effectively to: Communicate our effectiveness strategically Leverage funding to support our programs Build our expertise and resource base Support the Creating our Future plan for Cooperative Extension through our FCS Program efforts

7  Building Strong Family County Profiles – using them in your community and wherever the opportunity arises.  Using media and social media opportunities to share snippets of program success. We’ve got to be where our people are (i.e. Facebook).  Build personal skills to market the work we do with state, regional and county partners. (CEDIK – leadership development, data packaging, etc., Ag Communications- use of social media, marketing tools, television/radio skill- building, eXtension id)

8 Funding Sources that Support FCS Extension?  Federal Formula Funds  EFNEP  SNAP – Ed  Federal Ear-marked Funds (HEEL)  State Appropriations (Physical Activity, CES)  Federal Special Project Funds (MITT – 5 year commitment)  Grants (OMK, Plate it Up Kentucky Proud)  Gifts (KEAFCS Marketing funds, HES Future Fund)

9 EFNEP has:  History of Excellence  Documented impact  Research and Evidence- Based  Accountability built-in to the process of program implementation

10  New models of federal funding  Contracts  Future Grants that align with our mission  Fee-based services  ???

11 What data can we show that:  Shows our track record of success?  Shows our subject matter expertise to be qualified to provide the program or service?  Shows our capacity to be successful statewide?

12  Quality In-service Trainings to build our expertise in subject matter.  Funding and hiring FCS State staff with expertise, skills and time to coordinate the “logistics” of programming.  Moving from Research-based to Evidence-based resources for relevance. Building our base of evidence-based resources through data collection

13 Making sure that we are part of the solution through:  Developing a strong support base in the counties.  Promoting the outcomes of successful programs, partnerships and processes.  Recruiting leaders who understand the mission and vision of CES and can articulate the benefits/needs of the CES programs to others.

14 Sketching the Problem Draw a picture of the programs and activities that you can do to address the problem Draw what your county will look like as a result of the program Draw a picture of a problem or issue in your community

15 Plan of Work process is first step  Using the language from the FCS Strategic Plan. Unifies our efforts Makes it easier for FCS State Staff to do Key word searches in POW’s and in impact statements (PAC codes).  Provides a menu of options to choose from to customize our work to the counties.  Provides a way to collectively share our work with co- workers and stakeholders.  Builds in an evaluation plan from the outset.

16 Began March 2007 with State staff discussion of programmatic process and integrated focus areas to share with FCS agents to support plan of work process. Issues Flow/ Forums

17

18 Accessing Nutritious Foods Situation: Nutrition Education Programs help families gain access to food and stretch food dollars; communities to decrease hunger; and local food assistance programs to educate recipients on healthy and safe food preparation methods. Agents, paraprofessionals and volunteers are pivotal in training consumers and producers to maximize local access to food products from farm to table. INPUT  Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service (CES) agents, program assistants, specialists and volunteers  Kentucky CES publications and resources  eXtension resources  College of Agriculture faculty in - Nutrition and Food Sciences - Agricultural Economics - Horticulture  Local, state and federal partners OUTPUTS Activities Increase access to fruits and vegetables  Farmer’s Markets  Gardening Programs  Food Preservation  Local Food Systems (Farm to School, Farm to Institution)  GAP Training  KY Farm to School (F2S ) Curriculum  Literacy, Eating and Activity for Primary Youth Health (LEAP)  Weight, the Reality Series  UK CES Nutrition Education Program Participants People Limited resource individuals and families Families with children Youth Volunteers Organizations Farmer’s Markets KDA Schools LINK Community Partners i.e. -Faith Based Organizations -Food Pantries -Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

19 Accessing Nutritious Foods Situation: Nutrition Education Programs help families gain access to food and stretch food dollars; communities to decrease hunger; and local food assistance programs to educate recipients on healthy and safe food preparation methods. Agents, paraprofessionals and volunteers are pivotal in training consumers and producers to maximize local access to food products from farm to table. INPUT  Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service (CES) agents, program assistants, specialists and volunteers  Kentucky CES publications and resources  eXtension resources  College of Agriculture faculty in - Nutrition and Food Sciences - Agricultural Economics - Horticulture  Local, state and federal partners OUTPUTS Activities Increase access to fruits and vegetables  Farmer’s Markets  Gardening Programs  Food Preservation  Local Food Systems (Farm to School, Farm to Institution)  GAP Training  KY Farm to School (F2S ) Curriculum  Literacy, Eating and Activity for Primary Youth Health (LEAP)  Weight, the Reality Series  UK CES Nutrition Education Program Participants People Limited resource individuals and families Families with children Youth Volunteers Organizations Farmer’s Markets KDA Schools LINK Community Partners i.e. -Faith Based Organizations -Food Pantries -Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

20 Accessing Nutritious Foods Situation: Nutrition Education Programs help families gain access to food and stretch food dollars; communities to decrease hunger; and local food assistance programs to educate recipients on healthy and safe food preparation methods. Agents, paraprofessionals and volunteers are pivotal in training consumers and producers to maximize local access to food products from farm to table. INPUT  Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service (CES) agents, program assistants, specialists and volunteers  Kentucky CES publications and resources  eXtension resources  College of Agriculture faculty in - Nutrition and Food Sciences - Agricultural Economics - Horticulture  Local, state and federal partners OUTPUTS Activities Increase access to fruits and vegetables  Farmer’s Markets  Gardening Programs  Food Preservation  Local Food Systems (Farm to School, Farm to Institution)  GAP Training  KY Farm to School (F2S ) Curriculum  Literacy, Eating and Activity for Primary Youth Health (LEAP)  Weight, the Reality Series  UK CES Nutrition Education Program Participants People Limited resource individuals and families Families with children Youth Volunteers Organizations Farmer’s Markets KDA Schools LINK Community Partners i.e. -Faith Based Organizations -Food Pantries -Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

21 SEEC Long-term  Kentucky population will increase average fruit and vegetable consumption by 1 or more servings per day  More new mothers attempt to breast feed their babies and increase duration of breastfeeding to six weeks or more  Kentuckians improve food management skills and healthy eating habits  Youth will be food secure when school is not in session  People accessing emergency food sources will select from nutrient dense items Outcomes Behavioral Practices Intermediate Number who:  Access more local foods  Redeem Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program benefit  Plant, harvest and preserve produce  Apply improved food preparation skills, food management skills, food safety and healthy eating habits Number of:  New mothers utilize community services to support breastfeeding, such as WIC breast pump services  Youth who access other food sources when not in school  Households accessing emergency food sources KOSA Initial  Understand the importance of sustainable local agriculture to individual health and financial well- being  Learn to grow, prepare and preserve food  Learn to incorporate unfamiliar foods or foods not currently eaten into a healthy diet  New mothers and those who support them increase knowledge about the health and economic benefits of breastfeeding  Increase knowledge and understanding of healthy eating, food safety and food resource management  Learn about community support services to increase food security

22 SEEC Long-term  Kentucky population will increase average fruit and vegetable consumption by 1 or more servings per day  More new mothers attempt to breast feed their babies and increase duration of breastfeeding to six weeks or more  Kentuckians improve food management skills and healthy eating habits  Youth will be food secure when school is not in session  People accessing emergency food sources will select from nutrient dense items Outcomes Behavioral Practices Intermediate Number who:  Access more local foods  Redeem Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program benefit  Plant, harvest and preserve produce  Apply improved food preparation skills, food management skills, food safety and healthy eating habits Number of:  New mothers utilize community services to support breastfeeding, such as WIC breast pump services  Youth who access other food sources when not in school  Households accessing emergency food sources KOSA Initial  Understand the importance of sustainable local agriculture to individual health and financial well- being  Learn to grow, prepare and preserve food  Learn to incorporate unfamiliar foods or foods not currently eaten into a healthy diet  New mothers and those who support them increase knowledge about the health and economic benefits of breastfeeding  Increase knowledge and understanding of healthy eating, food safety and food resource management  Learn about community support services to increase food security

23 SEEC Long-term  Kentucky population will increase average fruit and vegetable consumption by 1 or more servings per day  More new mothers attempt to breast feed their babies and increase duration of breastfeeding to six weeks or more  Kentuckians improve food management skills and healthy eating habits  Youth will be food secure when school is not in session  People accessing emergency food sources will select from nutrient dense items Outcomes Behavioral Practices Intermediate Number who:  Access more local foods  Redeem Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program benefit  Plant, harvest and preserve produce  Apply improved food preparation skills, food management skills, food safety and healthy eating habits Number of:  New mothers utilize community services to support breastfeeding, such as WIC breast pump services  Youth who access other food sources when not in school  Households accessing emergency food sources KOSA Initial  Understand the importance of sustainable local agriculture to individual health and financial well- being  Learn to grow, prepare and preserve food  Learn to incorporate unfamiliar foods or foods not currently eaten into a healthy diet  New mothers and those who support them increase knowledge about the health and economic benefits of breastfeeding  Increase knowledge and understanding of healthy eating, food safety and food resource management  Learn about community support services to increase food security

24 At the end of the program year how will you know if you were successful in reaching your goals?

25 How do we collect data for FCS Programs within our CES System? Priority indicators Featured programs Impact Statements NEP reports (SNAP ed/ NEERS) Specific Surveys Sharing data directly with Specialists Other? Evaluation

26 A mixture of 1.Former state indicators, 2. New national indicators and 3. New state indicators.

27 Tool we have developed to help you organize programs to outcomes and indicators How will you determine if the desired outcomes are being achieved? From the outcomes listed in the sections above, tell which outcomes you plan to measure, the indicators you will use to assess change and the evaluation methods you will use. Then tell when evaluation activities will occur. Evaluation may reflect programs conducted for targeted audiences, by different agents, specific activities or the program as a whole.  Evaluation – Outcome: Indicator: Method: Timeline:

28 Indicator: 13. Number of families/caregivers reached that reported eating more healthy foods. Outcomes ( (I)Intermediate/Behavior/Practice Program PAC Code Method Timeline (I): Access more local foods. (I): Apply improved food preparation skills, food management skills, food safety, and healthy eating habits. (I): Increase healthy food choices and an increase in individuals’ ability to build healthy eating plans and patterns. Small Steps to Health and Wealth 241Small Steps to Health and Wealth Online Challenge Database; lesson evaluations Pre/post session: six months Demonstration gardens, including container gardens; Gardening programs # Garden projects; garden survey /HES/FCS/NEP/pdf/ / May – September; Follow-up October Food Preservation Programs 260Gardening and Food Preservation Survey /HES/FCS/NEP/pdf/ / May – September; Follow-up October Plate It Up Kentucky Proud 215 Featured program questions; number attending programs, receiving recipe cards Post session Food for Thought programs 260 Featured program questions; NEERS behavior questions Post Session; 3 month follow-up Champion Food Volunteer 216# volunteers trained; # programs conducted by volunteers, Post session survey of participants Post session; 3 month follow-up

29 Couponing Walk and Wok

30 Walk through the examples: 1. Program Assistants ? 2. Co-workers ? 3. Stakeholders ? In May at FCS Statewide Training we will have a session to discuss the process, answer questions, share the results of the district issues forums/POW process and finalize any details we have missed.

31 Contributions  Fotolia  Microsoft On-line  Printable-maps.blogspot.com  University of Kentucky Agricultural Communications  University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Laura Stephenson, Ph. D. Assistant Director for Family and Consumer Sciences Field Programs Pam Sigler, M.S. Senior Extension Specialist for Curriculum and Instruction January 2012


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