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Politics in Post-War Georgia, 1876-1917. SS8H7- The student will evaluate key political, social, and economic changes that occurred in Georgia between.

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Presentation on theme: "Politics in Post-War Georgia, 1876-1917. SS8H7- The student will evaluate key political, social, and economic changes that occurred in Georgia between."— Presentation transcript:

1 Politics in Post-War Georgia,

2 SS8H7- The student will evaluate key political, social, and economic changes that occurred in Georgia between 1877 and A. Evaluate the impact the Bourbon Triumvirate, Henry Grady, International Cotton Exposition, Tom Watson and the Populists, Rebecca Latimer Felton, the 1906 Atlanta Riot, the Leo Frank Case, and the county unit system had on Georgia during this period. Essential Questions - What was the impact of the Bourbon Triumvirate on Georgia politics and economy? - What were the beliefs of the Populists, and how did Populist Tom Watson change Georgia and the nation? - What were the differences in political views and philosophy among the following: Bourbon Triumvirate, Henry Grady, Tom Watson, Rebecca Latimer Felton?

3 Redeemers - After Reconstruction, Georgia Democrats wanted to “redeem,” that is, to win back their state from Republican influence and to oust freedmen, scalawags, and carpetbaggers from power. - Known as Redeemers, the Democrats worked to undo the changes imposed during Reconstruction. - This meant restoring Democrats to public office and making it clear that control of society should be in the hands of the white race, an idea known as white supremacy. - This time period immediately after Reconstruction is sometime called “Redemption.”

4 Constitution of This replaces the Reconstruction Constitution of 1868…which was considered a document written by the “enemy.” - Robert Toombs, known as the “unreconstructed rebel,” campaigned for a new state constitution and quickly took charge of the proceedings for the new replacement. - Because of the abuses during the Reconstruction period, the Constitution of 1877 became the most restrictive constitution in Georgia history…it made it nearly impossible for the state to borrow money, tax money could only be spent on purposes stated in the constitution, and it reduced the offices of governor and state senator from four years to two years.

5 The Bourbon Redeemers

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10 Independent Democrats …BUT SOME RESISTED THE “NEW SOUTH”… - The first challenger to the Bourbons came from Independent Democrats. - Their leaders were Dr. William H. Felton And his wife Rebecca Latimer Felton. - Dr. Felton was elected three times to the U.S. Congress as an Independent Democrat - Mrs. Felton wrote articles made speeches, wrote articles and sent letters to newspapers about the injustices that farmers and “little people” were suffering because of the favoritism shown towards industrialism….the Independents also disagreed with the Bourbons on the convict lease system. - The Independent movement reached its peak in 1878 when Georgians elected three Independents to Congress…the movement died out by 1882, forcing farmers to find another way to challenge the Bourbons.

11 Farmer’s Alliance

12 Populists

13 …BUT SOME RESISTED THE “NEW SOUTH”… - In the election of 1892, Watson ran as a Populist. - Although most Georgians were farmers, Watson felt that political and economic power was in the hands of merchants, bankers, and lawyers who lived in the big cities…he felt that the Bourbon Democrats had allowed business and financial interests in the North to get rich at the expense of the farmer. - The Bourbons fought back fiercely…they charged that voting for Watson, a Populist, would split the white vote thus allowing blacks to hold political office once again. - In an election filled with fraud, Watson was defeated. Watson ran again and again as a Populist but never won. Watson wound up bitter and hateful (particularly towards blacks, Catholics and Jews).

14 Progressive Democrats

15 - By this time the Bourbons were no longer a guiding force in state politics, an informal group of Democrats known as the “progressives” had plans for improving conditions in Georgia - The Progressive movement was a nationwide movement that wanted to improve moral and social conditions in the South, especially in the areas of child labor, prison reform, prohibition, and voting for women - Progressives wanted to break up large corporations and regulate business. - Progressives wanted voters to have more influence in government.

16 Progressive Democrats ON THE FLIPSIDE… - Progressive stressed white supremacy and put in place the poll tax, white primary, literacy test, and the grandfather clause. Their intention was to keep Georgia a one-party state. - Progressive candidate Hoke Smith ran for governor of Georgia in 1906 on a platform that included black disfranchisement.


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