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OT Survey I Judges and Ruth. Setting of Judges The book of Judges follows immediately upon the conquest of the land described in the book of Joshua, and.

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Presentation on theme: "OT Survey I Judges and Ruth. Setting of Judges The book of Judges follows immediately upon the conquest of the land described in the book of Joshua, and."— Presentation transcript:

1 OT Survey I Judges and Ruth

2 Setting of Judges The book of Judges follows immediately upon the conquest of the land described in the book of Joshua, and covers an approximately 335 year period from the death of Joshua (c B.C.) until the death of Samson (c B.C.). The events of the book take place at various places within the land of Israel. The book of Judges follows immediately upon the conquest of the land described in the book of Joshua, and covers an approximately 335 year period from the death of Joshua (c B.C.) until the death of Samson (c B.C.). The events of the book take place at various places within the land of Israel.

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4 Purpose Statement Israel’s failure during the time of the theocracy provides the background and demonstrates the need for a righteous king to lead the people. Israel’s failure during the time of the theocracy provides the background and demonstrates the need for a righteous king to lead the people.

5 The Cycle of Judges Judges 2:6-23 provides a good summary of the book. Judges 2:6-23 provides a good summary of the book. Served the Lord Sinned/Idolatry Became Slaves Cried to the Lord Yahweh Raised Up a Judge Israel Delivered

6 Major Themes God’s sovereign rule and longsuffering God’s sovereign rule and longsuffering Israel’s incomplete obedience and its resulting consequences Israel’s incomplete obedience and its resulting consequences The Judges The Judges Major Judges - Othniel, Ehud, Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson Major Judges - Othniel, Ehud, Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson Minor Judges - Shamgar, Tola, Jair, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon Minor Judges - Shamgar, Tola, Jair, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon “There was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes.” “There was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes.” The Angel of the Lord The Angel of the Lord

7 Structure Failure of Israel to Complete the Conquest (chap 1) Failure of Israel to Complete the Conquest (chap 1) God’s Judgment for this Failure (chap 2) God’s Judgment for this Failure (chap 2) The Seven Cycles of Deliverance (chaps 3-16) The Seven Cycles of Deliverance (chaps 3-16) From Mesopotamians (3:7-11) From Mesopotamians (3:7-11) From Moabites (3:12-30) and From Philistines (3:31) From Moabites (3:12-30) and From Philistines (3:31) From Canaanites (4:1 – 5:31) From Canaanites (4:1 – 5:31) From Midianites (6:1 – 8:32) From Midianites (6:1 – 8:32) From Abimelech (8:33 – 10:5) From Abimelech (8:33 – 10:5) From Ammonites (10:6 – 12:15) From Ammonites (10:6 – 12:15) From Philistines (13:1 – 16:31) From Philistines (13:1 – 16:31) Israel’s Failure through Becoming Like the Canaanites (chaps 17-21) Israel’s Failure through Becoming Like the Canaanites (chaps 17-21) The Failure of Israel through Idolatry (17:1 – 18:31) The Failure of Israel through Idolatry (17:1 – 18:31) The Failure of Israel through Immorality (19:1-30) The Failure of Israel through Immorality (19:1-30) The Failure of Israel through War between the Tribes (20:1 – 21:25) The Failure of Israel through War between the Tribes (20:1 – 21:25)

8 Commentary on Incidents in Judges “Without question these accounts portray a shocking array of covenant violations, all under the guise of normative worship. There is no doubt that the people in these stories are totally immersed in Canaanite worldviews that make even the Ten Commandments irrelevant to them” (Paul House, Old Testament Theology, p. 223). “Without question these accounts portray a shocking array of covenant violations, all under the guise of normative worship. There is no doubt that the people in these stories are totally immersed in Canaanite worldviews that make even the Ten Commandments irrelevant to them” (Paul House, Old Testament Theology, p. 223).

9 Ruth

10 Key Players in Ruth Elimelech – from Bethlehem; husband of Naomi. Elimelech – from Bethlehem; husband of Naomi. Mahlon and Chilion – Sons of Elimelech and Naomi Mahlon and Chilion – Sons of Elimelech and Naomi Orpah and Ruth – Moabite women married to Mahlon and Chilion Orpah and Ruth – Moabite women married to Mahlon and Chilion Boaz – Kinsman of Naomi Boaz – Kinsman of Naomi

11 Setting “In the days when the judges governed” (1:1). Because of the famine in Israel, Elimelech took his wife and sons to Moab. “In the days when the judges governed” (1:1). Because of the famine in Israel, Elimelech took his wife and sons to Moab.

12 Major Themes The sovereignty and providence of God The sovereignty and providence of God God’s grace and mercy to both individuals and Israel God’s grace and mercy to both individuals and Israel Godly characters in the midst of an evil generation Godly characters in the midst of an evil generation Naomi Naomi Ruth Ruth Boaz Boaz Kinsman redeemer Kinsman redeemer

13 Concept of Kinsman Redeemer Leviticus 25:25 “If a fellow countryman of yours becomes so poor he has to sell part of his property, then his nearest kinsman is to come and buy back what his relative has sold.” Leviticus 25:47-49 “Now if the means of a stranger or of a sojourner with you becomes sufficient, and a countryman of yours becomes so poor with regard to him as to sell himself to a stranger who is sojourning with you, or to the descendants of a stranger's family, then he shall have redemption right after he has been sold. One of his brothers may redeem him, or his uncle, or his uncle's son, may redeem him, or one of his blood relatives from his family may redeem him; or if he prospers, he may redeem himself.”

14 Structure Ruth’s Commitment to Naomi (chap 1) Ruth’s Commitment to Naomi (chap 1) Ruth’s Faithfulness to Naomi (chap 2) Ruth’s Faithfulness to Naomi (chap 2) Ruth’s Claim upon Boaz (chap 3) Ruth’s Claim upon Boaz (chap 3) Ruth’s Redemption by Boaz and an Important Descendant (chap 4) Ruth’s Redemption by Boaz and an Important Descendant (chap 4)

15 Purpose and Message The book ends with the genealogy of David, and thus highlights God’s sovereignty and providence in bringing about the birth of His king, even against large obstacles. The book ends with the genealogy of David, and thus highlights God’s sovereignty and providence in bringing about the birth of His king, even against large obstacles. “The judges period that provided the setting was notorious for its apostasy and covenantal ignorance and offense; faith was at a premium. How did the faith of Israel survive? We suggest that it survived in the common folk such as Elimelech and Naomi. The overall picture was glum, but there were faithful individuals. This issue is not without significance for the reader’s understanding of David. As the historical narratives move from the judges period to the monarchy, David can be viewed with great incredulity. How could faith like this still exist after four hundred years of conditions such as those described in the book of Judges? The story of Ruth, drawn from David’s ancestry, offers an explanation of the survival of faith.... The message is that God preserved families of faith and that from one such family King David came” (Hill and Walton, A Survey of the Old Testament, 184). “The judges period that provided the setting was notorious for its apostasy and covenantal ignorance and offense; faith was at a premium. How did the faith of Israel survive? We suggest that it survived in the common folk such as Elimelech and Naomi. The overall picture was glum, but there were faithful individuals. This issue is not without significance for the reader’s understanding of David. As the historical narratives move from the judges period to the monarchy, David can be viewed with great incredulity. How could faith like this still exist after four hundred years of conditions such as those described in the book of Judges? The story of Ruth, drawn from David’s ancestry, offers an explanation of the survival of faith.... The message is that God preserved families of faith and that from one such family King David came” (Hill and Walton, A Survey of the Old Testament, 184).

16 Next Week 1 Samuel


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