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Ch. 16. SC.912.N.1.1, SC.912.N.2.5 SC.912.E.6.5, SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7.3, SC.912.E.7.4, SC.912.E.7.9.

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Presentation on theme: "Ch. 16. SC.912.N.1.1, SC.912.N.2.5 SC.912.E.6.5, SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7.3, SC.912.E.7.4, SC.912.E.7.9."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ch. 16

2 SC.912.N.1.1, SC.912.N.2.5 SC.912.E.6.5, SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7.3, SC.912.E.7.4, SC.912.E.7.9

3  Explain how surface currents develop.  Describe how ocean currents affect climate.  State the importance of upwelling.  Describe the formation of density currents.

4  Ocean current  Surface current  Gyre  Coriolis Effect  Upwelling  Density current

5 1. How do surface currents develop? 2. How do ocean currents affect climate? 3. Why is upwelling important? 4. How are density currents formed?

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7 h?videoId=3niR_-Kv4SM

8  Ocean current is the mass of ocean water that flows from one place to another.  Surface currents are movements of water that flow horizontally in the upper part of the ocean’s surface.  Surface currents develop from friction between the ocean and the wind that blows across its surface.

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10  Gyres are huge circular-moving current systems that dominate the surfaces of the oceans.  The Coriolis effect is the deflection of currents away from their original course as a result of Earth’s rotation.

11  When currents from low-latitude regions move into higher latitudes, they transfer heat from warmer to cooler areas on Earth.  As cold water currents travel toward the equator, they help moderate the warm temperatures of adjacent land areas.

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13  Upwelling is the rise of cold water from deeper layers to replace warmer surface water.  Upwelling brings greater concentrations of dissolved nutrients, such as nitrates and phosphates, to the ocean surface.

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15  Density currents are vertical currents of ocean water that result from density differences among water masses.  An increase in seawater density can be caused by a decrease in temperature or an increase in salinity.

16  High Latitudes  Most water involved in deep-ocean currents begins in high latitudes at the surface.  Evaporation  Density currents can also result from increased salinity of ocean water due to evaporation.

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18  In a simplified model, ocean circulation is similar to a conveyor belt that travels from the Atlantic Ocean, through the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and back again.

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20 h?videoId=Ca4eRt2wwg8

21 You have 15 minutes to answer the questions from this section. Be prepared to discuss your answers.

22 Surface currents develop from friction between the ocean and the wind that blows across its surface.

23 Warm water currents that come from equatorial regions transfer heat to cooler areas of Earth; for example the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic currents warm northwestern Europe in the winter months. Cold water currents from the poles moderate warm temperatures of adjacent land areas.

24 Upwelling brings dissolved nutrients to the ocean surface, providing the necessary nutrients for phytoplankton to undergo photosynthesis. This productivity supports the extensive populations of fish and other organisms.

25 They are formed when the density of water changes due to a change in salinity and temperature.

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28  Describe how ocean waves get energy.  State three factors that determine characteristics of a wave.  Describe how energy moves through a wave.  Explain the forces that produce tides.

29  Wave height  Wave length  Wave period  Fetch  Tide  Tidal range  Spring tide  Neap tide

30 h?videoId=l1WF8b6HZLM

31  Purpose – Students will see that wave energy travels without causing individual particles of the medium to move very much.  Materials – Slinky toy  Procedure – Have a student hold one end of a slinky without moving it. Stretch the slinky out, gather a few rings together, release them all at once while still holding the end of the slinky in your hand.

32 1. From where do ocean waves obtain energy? 2. What three quantities are used to describe a wave? 3. How does energy move by means of a wave? 4. What force produces tides? 5. What are three typical tidal patterns?

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34  Most ocean waves obtain their energy and motion from the wind.  The wave height is the vertical distance between the trough and crest.  The wavelength is the horizontal distance between two successive crests or two successive troughs.

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36  The wave period is the time it takes one full wave—one wavelength—to pass a fixed position.  Fetch is the distance that the wind has traveled across open water.  The height, length, and period that are eventually achieved by a wave depend on three factors: (1) wind speed, (2) length of time the wind has blown, and (3) fetch.

37  Circular orbital motion allows energy to move forward through the water while the individual water particles that transmit the wave move around in a circle.

38  Changes occur as a wave moves onto shore.  As the waves touch bottom, wave speed decreases. The decrease in wave speed results in a decrease in wavelength and an increase in wave height.

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40  Tides are daily changes in the elevation of the ocean surface.  Ocean tides result from the gravitational attraction exerted upon Earth by the moon and, to a lesser extent, by the sun.  Tide-Causing Forces  The force that produces tides is gravity.

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42  Tidal range is the difference in height between successive high and low tides.  Spring tides are tides that have the greatest tidal range due to the alignment of the Earth– moon–sun system.  Neap tides are tides that have the lowest tidal range, occurring near the times of the first- quarter and third-quarter phases of the moon.

43 SPRING TIDESNEAP TIDES  When the Earth, Moon, and Sun are aligned we experience Spring Tides.  New Moon & Full Moon  When Earth, Moon, and Sun are at right angles to each other, we experience Neap Tides.  First Quarter & Third Quarter

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45  Three main tidal patterns exist worldwide: diurnal tides, semidiurnal tides, and mixed tides.

46 You have 15 minutes to answer the questions from this section. Be prepared to discuss your answers.

47 Waves obtain their energy from wind.

48 Three qualities used to describe waves are: wind speed, the length of time the wind has blown, and fetch.

49 Circular motion allows energy to move forward through a wave, while the individual water particles that transmit the wave move around in a circle.

50 Gravity is the force that produces tides.

51 The three tidal patterns are: diurnal, semidiurnal, and mixed.

52 SC.912.N.1.1, SC.912.N.2.5 SC.912.E.6.5, SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7.3, SC.912.E.7.4, SC.912.E.7.9

53  List the agents responsible for the movement of sediments along the shoreline.  Explain how refraction affects wave action along the shore.  Describe the processes that form shoreline features.  List the structures that can be built to protect a shoreline.

54  Beach  Wave refraction  Longshore currents  Barrier islands

55 1. How does refraction affect wave action along the shore? 2. What do longshore currents do? 3. By which processes do shoreline features form? 4. What structures can be built to protect a shoreline? 5. What is beach nourishment?

56  A beach is the accumulation of sediment found along the shore of a lake or ocean.  Waves along the shoreline are constantly eroding, transporting, and depositing sediment. Many types of shoreline features can result from this activity.

57 WAVE IMPACTABRASION The impact of large, high- energy waves against the shore can be awesome in its violence. Each breaking wave may hurl thousands of tons of water against the land, sometimes causing the ground to tremble.  Abrasion is the sawing and grinding action of rock fragments in the water.  Abrasion is probably more intense in the surf zone than in any other environment.

58  Wave refraction is the bending of waves, and it plays an important part in the shoreline process.  Because of refraction, wave energy is concentrated against the sides and ends of headlands that project into the water, whereas wave action is weakened in bays.

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60  A longshore current is a near-shore current that flows parallel to the shore.  Turbulence allows longshore currents to easily move fine suspended sand and to roll larger sand and gravel particles along the bottom.

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62  Shoreline features that originate primarily from the work of erosion are called erosional features. Sediment that is transported along the shore and deposited in areas where energy is low produces depositional features.

63  Wave-Cut Cliffs and Platforms  Wave-cut cliffs result from the cutting action of the surf against the base of coastal land. A flat, bench- like, wave-cut platform forms in front of the wave-cut cliff.  Sea Arches and Sea Stacks  When two caves on opposite sides of a headland unite, a sea arch results. Eventually, the arch falls in, leaving an isolated remnant, or sea stack, on the wave-cut platform.

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65  Where longshore currents and other surf zone currents are active, several features related to the movement of sediment along the shore may develop.

66  A spit is an elongated ridge of sand that projects from the land into the mouth of an adjacent bay.  A baymouth bar is a sandbar that completely crosses a bay.  A tombolo is a ridge of sand that connects an island to the mainland or to another island.

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68  Barrier islands are narrow sandbars parallel to, but separate from, the coast at distances from 3 to 30 kilometers offshore.

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70  Protective Structures  Groins, breakwaters, and seawalls are some structures built to protect a coast from erosion or to prevent the movement of sand along a beach.  Beach nourishment  Beach nourishment is the addition of large quantities of sand to the beach system.

71  Groins are structures built at right angles to the shore to trap sand moving parallel to the shore to maintain beaches.  Seawalls are structures built parallel to shore that shields the coast from breaking waves.

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73 You will need to write 10 facts from the video.

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75 You have 15 minutes to answer the questions from this section. Be prepared to discuss your answers.

76 Wave energy is concentrated against the sides of headlands, and it is weakened in the bays.

77 Longshore currents move fine suspended sand and roll larger sand and gravel along the bottom and along the shore.

78 Waves erode, transport, and deposit sediment, forming many shoreline features.

79 Groins, breakers, and seawalls are structures built to protect the shoreline.

80 Beach nourishment is an approach to stabilize the shoreline by adding large quantities of sand to the beach system.


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