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Overview of Presidential Elections. The American “Party Systems” Framers' Non-Partisan System (1789-1792) First Party System (1796-1816) Democratic-Republicans.

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Presentation on theme: "Overview of Presidential Elections. The American “Party Systems” Framers' Non-Partisan System (1789-1792) First Party System (1796-1816) Democratic-Republicans."— Presentation transcript:

1 Overview of Presidential Elections

2 The American “Party Systems” Framers' Non-Partisan System ( ) First Party System ( ) Democratic-Republicans vs. Federalists (agrarian/labor) (commercial/financial) (mostly South & “West”) (Northeast & especially N.E.) Congressional Caucus nominating system Era of Good Feelings and One-Party Factionalism ( ) collapse of Federalist Party collapse of Congressional Caucus

3 “Party Systems” (cont.) Second Party System ( ) Democrats vs. Whigs (Nat. Reps.+ Anti-Masonic) (agrarian and lower-class) (commercial and upper-class) largely non-sectional rise of mass parties and campaigns origins of party organization based on patronage greatly increased franchise and turnout creation national nominating convention extensive third party activity (and fusion) Civil War Disruption ( ) Democrats vs. Republicans (N. Whigs + Free Soil) (pro-South) (North)

4 “Party Systems” (cont.) Third Party System ( ) Democrats vs. Republicans (agrarian + labor + immigrants) (commercial/industrial) (South plus some North) (most of North) very close and high-turnout elections from 1874 onward frequent divided government after 1876, consolidation of “Solid South” rise of political machines based on patronage highpoint of party-dominant nominating politics introduction of Australian ballot and anti-fusion laws agrarian protest third party movements

5 “Party Systems” (cont.) Fourth Party System ( ) Democrats (+ Populists) vs. Republicans agrarian plus immigrants) (commercial/industrial) (South plus some West and some cities) (Northeast & Midwest) maximal sectionalism black disenfranchisement in the Jim Crow South rise of Progressive political reforms voter registration, primaries, initiative and referendum, etc. decline of voting turnout rise of “mixed system” of nomination (with Pres. primaries) political machines begin to decline

6 “Party Systems” (cont.) Fifth (New Deal) Party System ( ) Democrats vs. Republicans (labor/ethnic/urban plus South) (business & prof. [outside of South]) class based politics (outside of South) New Deal vs. anti-New Deal increased turnout civil rights movement and cracks in the old “Solid [Democratic] South” conflict between “new reformers” and “old bosses” origins of mass media campaigns, etc.

7 “Party Systems” (cont.) Sixth Party System ( ) Democrats vs. Republicans (“liberals”) (“conservatives”) (pro-New Deal remnant) (anti-New Deal remnant) (great majority of non-whites) (majority of whites) rise of social/cultural issues rise of candidate-oriented Pres. nominating politics migration of white Southerners from Dem ==> Rep rise of candidate-centered politics and media campaigns era of divided government (Rep. Presidents vs. Dem. House)

8 “Party Systems” (cont.) Seventh Party System (2000? - ???) Democrats vs. Republicans (“blue states”) (“red states”) coastal America middle America secular America religious America (great majority of non-whites) (majority of whites) increased turnout dominance of social/cultural issues solidification of “solid Republican South” (Cong. + Pres.) strengthened party identification in electorate greatly strengthen party unity in Congress extremely close Presidential and Congressional elections resumption of unified government

9 Realigning Elections ushering in First Party System ushering in Second Party System ushering in Third Party System 1896 ushering in Fourth Party System ushering in Fifth Party System ushering in Sixth Party System 2000-??? Ushering in ????


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