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Metabolic Syndrome Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference Circulation. 2004;109:433-438.

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Presentation on theme: "Metabolic Syndrome Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference Circulation. 2004;109:433-438."— Presentation transcript:

1 Metabolic Syndrome Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference Circulation. 2004;109:

2 "Metabolic Syndrome" (dysmetabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, obesity syndrome, and Reaven’s syndrome) describes a cluster of CVD risk factors and metabolic alterations associated with excess fat weight. The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome based on data from Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III): There was a slightly greater prevalence among women. 24.7% of female vs. 21.7% of males (p=0.007) Whites were at greater risk. 24.1% of whites, 19.3% of blacks, and 16.5% of “other races” (p=0.003)

3 The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/American Heart Association Conference reviewed the scientific evidence related to definition of metabolic syndrome from several perspectives: (1) major clinical outcomes (2) metabolic components (3) pathogenesis (4) clinical criteria for diagnosis (5) risk for clinical outcomes (6) therapeutic interventions

4 CVD Type 2 Diabetes Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Fatty Liver Cholesterol Gallstones Asthma Sleep Disturbances Cancer Coagulation abnormalities Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

5 The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III report (ATP III) identified 6 components of the metabolic syndrome that relate to CVD: 1. Abdominal obesity 2. Atherogenic dyslipidemia 3. Raised blood pressure 4. Insulin resistance  glucose intolerance 5. Proinflammatory state 6. Prothrombotic state Components of metabolic syndrome Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

6 The form of obesity most strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome. It presents clinically as increased waist circumference. Abdominal obesity  triglycerides  HDL cholesterol  remnant lipoproteins  apolipoprotein B Small LDL/HDL particles Atherogenic dyslipidemiaElevated blood pressure Strongly associates with obesity and commonly occurs in insulin-resistant persons. Although it is multifactorial and less “metabolic” than other metabolic- syndrome components.

7 Present in the majority of people with the metabolic syndrome. It strongly associates with other metabolic risk factors and correlates with CVD risk. These associations, combined with belief in its priority, account for the term insulin resistance syndrome. Elevated glucose constitutes a major, independent risk factor for CVD. Insulin resistance  glucose intolerance Recognized clinically by elevations of C-reactive protein (CRP), is commonly present in persons with metabolic syndrome. Adipose tissue  inflammatory cytokines   CRP levels. Proinflammatory state Characterized by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 and fibrinogen. Fibrinogen, an acute-phase reactant like CRP, rises in response to a high-cytokine state. Prothrombotic state

8 Pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome 1. Obesity and abnormal body fat distribution 2. Insulin resistance 3. Other factors that mediate specific components of the metabolic syndrome Three etiological categories: Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

9 Obesity and Abnormal Body Fat Distribution The National Cholesterol Education Program’s ATP III considered the “ obesity epidemic ” as mainly responsible for the rising prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Independent atherogenic risk factors :  triglycerides and  HDL cholesterol  remnant lipoproteins,  apolipoprotein B, small LDL, HDL particles.  Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA): overloads muscle and liver with lipid, which enhances insulin resistance.  Cytokines, CRP levels: proinflammatory state  PAI-1: prothrombotic state  Adiponectin: worsen of metabolic risk factors

10 Insulin Resistance Many investigators place a greater priority on insulin resistance than on obesity in pathogenesis. Insulin resistance  other metabolic risk factors. Yet a broad range of insulin sensitivities exists at any given level of body fat. Hyperinsulinemia:  very low density lipoprotein,  triglycerides.  glucose: a major, independent risk factor for CVD. Insulin resistance:  blood pressure by a variety of mechanisms.

11 Other Factors That Mediate Specific Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Genetic variation in lipoprotein metabolism, blood pressure regulation, insulin-secretory capacity, insulin sensitivity. Advancing age Endocrine factors linked to abnormalities in body-fat distribution

12 At least 3 organizations have recommended clinical criteria for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. Their criteria are similar in many aspects, but they also reveal fundamental differences in positioning of the predominant causes of the syndrome. Clinical criteria for diagnosis Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

13 The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III report (ATP III) (Diagnosis can be made if 3 out of 5 present) Circulation. 2004;109:

14 The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III report (ATP III) The primary clinical outcome of metabolic syndrome was CHD/CVD. Priority is given to abdominal obesity as a contributor to metabolic syndrome. Cutpoints for several of these are less stringent than usually required to identify a categorical risk factor, because multiple marginal risk factors can impart significantly increased risk for CVD. Explicit demonstration of insulin resistance is not required for diagnosis.

15 World Health Organization

16 The guideline group also recognized CVD as the primary outcome of the metabolic syndrome. However, it viewed insulin resistance as a required component for diagnosis. In addition to insulin resistance, 2 other risk factors are sufficient for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. A higher blood pressure was required than in ATP III. BMI (or increased waist:hip ratio) was used instead of waist circumference Microalbuminuria was listed as one criterion The requirement of objective evidence of insulin resistance should give more power to predict diabetes than does ATP III, but less applicable.

17 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

18 These criteria appear to be a hybrid of those of ATP III and WHO metabolic syndrome. However, no defined number of risk factors is specified; diagnosis is left to clinical judgment. Finding abnormal 2-hour glucose will improve prediction of type 2 diabetes. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

19 Risk for clinical outcomes Metabolic Syndrome as a Predictor of CVD Metabolic Syndrome as a Predictor of Diabetes Diabetes as a Predictor of CVD Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

20 Metabolic Syndrome as a Predictor of CVD In Framingham, the metabolic syndrome alone predicted 25% of all new- onset CVD. In the absence of diabetes, the metabolic syndrome generally did not raise 10-year risk for CHD to >20%. Most of the risk associated with the metabolic syndrome is age, blood pressure, total cholesterol, diabetes, and HDL cholesterol. Beyond these, obesity, triglycerides, and glucose levels (in the absence of diabetes) provided little additional power of prediction.

21 Metabolic Syndrome as a Predictor of Diabetes Metabolic syndrome  new-onset diabetes. Framingham cohort, in both men and women, Almost half of the population-attributable risk for diabetes could be explained by the presence of ATP III metabolic syndrome.

22 Diabetes as a Predictor of CVD Framingham data showed that most men with diabetes had a 10-year risk for CHD 20%; in contrast, women rarely exceeded the 20% level. Oxford investigators therefore have developed a risk engine based on the large UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) database, which had 500 hard CHD events. It differs from the Framingham algorithm in that it includes a measure of glycemia and duration of diabetes. Surveys of other diabetic populations by UKPDS investigators found that Framingham equations considerably underestimate risk for CHD and stroke, whereas the UKPDS Risk Engine provides a more robust estimate.

23 Therapeutic interventions Obesity and Body Fat Distribution as Targets of Therapy Insulin Resistance as Target of Therapy Specific Metabolic Risk Factors as Targets of Therapy Major clinical outcomes Metabolic components Pathogenesis Clinical criteria for diagnosis Risk for clinical outcomes Therapeutic interventions

24 Obesity and Body Fat Distribution as Targets of Therapy ATP III recommended that obesity be the primary target of intervention for metabolic syndrome. First-line therapy: Weight reduction, increased physical activity.  serum cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, CRP, PAI-1, blood pressure, insulin resistance  HDL cholesterol Implementation is the challenge!

25 Insulin Resistance as Target of Therapy Insulin resistance, whether primary or secondary to obesity, is an attractive target. Weight reduction and increased physical activity Two classes of drugs treating type 2 diabetes: Metformin and thiazolidinediones (TZDs). In UKPDS, metformin apparently reduced newonset CHD in obese patients with diabetes. In the Diabetes Prevention Program, metformin therapy prevented (or delayed) onset of type 2 diabetes in persons with IGT. There are, however, no CVD end-point studies on metformin or TZDs-treated patients with metabolic syndrome.

26 Specific Metabolic Risk Factors as Targets of Therapy Atherogenic Dyslipidemia Statins:  all apolipoprotein B – containing lipoproteins. Statin trials reveal that statins reduce risk for CVD events in patients with metabolic syndrome. Fibrates Fibrate trials strongly suggests that they reduce CVD end points in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome. Elevated Blood Pressure Lifestyle therapies Antihypertensive drugs No class of antihypertensive drugs has been identified as being uniquely efficacious in patients with metabolic syndrome.

27 Prothrombotic State No drugs are available that target PAI-1 and fibrinogen. Antiplatelet therapy: low-dose aspirin reduces CVD events Proinflammatory State Several lipid-lowering drugs will reduce CRP levels, which could reflect an anti-inflammatory action. Hyperglycemia Lifestyle therapies Hypoglycemic agents

28 CVD is the primary clinical outcome of metabolic syndrome Risk for type 2 diabetes is higher Diabetes is a major risk factor for CVD ATP III criteria provide a practical tool to identify patients at increased risk for CVD WHO and AACE criteria require further oral glucose testing if IFG and diabetes are absent. Full agreement that therapeutic lifestle change (weight reduction) constitutes first-line therapy. Conclusion


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