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1716 “An Assembly of Demigods” Who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? They were, for the most part, considered.

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Presentation on theme: "1716 “An Assembly of Demigods” Who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? They were, for the most part, considered."— Presentation transcript:

1 1716 “An Assembly of Demigods” Who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? They were, for the most part, considered to be the foremost legal and political minds within the young nation. Thomas Jefferson, serving as U.S. ambassador to France, described the people attending the Constitutional Convention as "an assembly of demigods." What did he mean by this? Each delegate brought to the convention his own concerns and those of his state. The differing perspectives on such issues as representation in the national legislature, the establishment of a national judicial system, and the powers of the executive resulted in repeated deadlocks. All proud men, their convictions were not easily swayed. More than once these divergent (differing) viewpoints threatened to dissolve the convention under a cloud of anger and discord. Seventy-four delegates, representing all of the states except Rhode Island (which refused to participate), were named to the Philadelphia convention. However, only 55 attended at one time or another. Of these, only 42 were present at the close of the convention, with three of these refusing to sign the final draft of the U.S. Constitution. By trade, 28 of the delegates were lawyers, nine were planters, and six financiers. Four physicians and four public officials rounded out the group. Even at 81 years of age, Philadelphia's own Benjamin Franklin could not deny that it was a gathering dominated by youth. The average age of those in attendance was 43. The youngest delegate, 27-year-old Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey, was joined by other youthful and experienced thinkers. Some of these young minds were South Carolina's Charles Pinckney, age 29; Alexander Hamilton of New York, age 30; Virginia's 36-year-old James Madison; Edmund Randolph, the 34-year-old governor of Virginia; and Gouverneur Morris, age 35, of Pennsylvania. All of these men would play major roles in the convention. Despite the dominance of youth, the delegates were remarkably experienced in the affairs of their individual states and the loosely-knit nation. 46 had been members of one or both houses of their colonial or state legislatures. Ten had been in attendance at state constitutional conventions, with 16 having served or soon to serve as governors. Included in the convention were 42 delegates to the Continental Congress; eight signers of the Declaration of Independence; six signers of the draft of the Articles of Confederation; and two future presidents of the United States. Although each state was proudly represented, there can be no doubt that the Virginia and Pennsylvania delegations contained the most illustrious figures. For example, the Virginia delegation included: George Washington – The hero of the Revolutionary War, Washington's presence in Philadelphia set a standard of conduct and thinking for others. A good indication of the universal respect for Washington was that, on the first day of the gathering, he was unanimously elected president of the convention. Cite THREE supporting details for the following statement: The delegates to the Constitutional Convention were “an assembly of demigods.”

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4 Page 15 Lesson 7 An Assembly of Demigods The Constitutional Convention

5 Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! You have been chosen as a delegate to represent your state! Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

6 This part of the unit has three sections: Opening the Convention (Lessons 7 and 8) Debating Issues at the Convention (Lessons 9, 10, and 11) Signing and Ratifying the Constitution (Lesson 12) Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

7 Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! Attach Your Delegate’s Profile (Role Card) and Picture You are assuming the identity of an actual delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Read over your Profile ( Role Card) and take on that persona. L 14 Make a “name placard” for yourself. Include your name and image about yourself. Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

8 Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! The Assembly Room is set up for all thirteen states, however, as you look around the room you notice... Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

9 The Constitutional Convention The Assembly Room New Hampshire George Washington New Jersey Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Delaware Connecticut Massachusetts Pennsylvania New York Maryland Virginia

10 Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! The Assembly Room is set up for all thirteen states, however, as you look around the room you notice... the delegates from Rhode Island are MISSING. WHY do you think that is so? Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

11 Welcome to Philadelphia, Delegates! Mingle around the room, introduce yourself as you greet one another. Some common phrases are “I am heartily glad to see you, Mr. Madison.” “It is my pleasure to be in your company, Dr. Franklin.” Be prepared to share about at least one person you met. Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

12 “The Dream Team” The Dream Team concept when it first came out was to take 11 of the best players to have represented the golden age of NBA basketball and form a team. You made team captains out of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, the two players that dominated the 1980s an easily on most people's list of the top-five NBA players of all time. You add unstoppable Michael Jordan, physical anomaly and never-muzzled Charles Barkley, the league’s best duo in John Stockton and Karl Malone, New York pivot man Patrick Ewing, sharpshooter Chris Mullin, high-flying Clyde Drexler, Jack-of-all- trades Scottie Pippen, David Robinson and one college senior, and you have the best team ever assembled. L 14 W ARM U P What is a “dream team?” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

13 L EARNING T ARGET  I can explain how the delegates to the Constitutional Convention were the “Dream Team” of American politics.  demigod VOCAB “An assembly of demigods” Thomas Jefferson 15 R Key Vocabulary to add to Flashcard List (8) DEMIGOD a person with great powers and abilities Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

14 “An Assembly of Demigods” Who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? They were, for the most part, considered to be the foremost legal and political minds within the young nation. Thomas Jefferson, serving as U.S. ambassador to France, described the people attending the Constitutional Convention as "an assembly of demigods." What did he mean by this? Each delegate brought to the convention his own concerns and those of his state. The differing perspectives on such issues as representation in the national legislature, the establishment of a national judicial system, and the powers of the executive resulted in repeated deadlocks. All proud men, their convictions were not easily swayed. More than once these divergent (differing) viewpoints threatened to dissolve the convention under a cloud of anger and discord. Seventy-four delegates, representing all of the states except Rhode Island (which refused to participate), were named to the Philadelphia convention. However, only 55 attended at one time or another. Of these, only 42 were present at the close of the convention, with three of these refusing to sign the final draft of the U.S. Constitution. By trade, 28 of the delegates were lawyers, nine were planters, and six financiers. Four physicians and four public officials rounded out the group. Even at 81 years of age, Philadelphia's own Benjamin Franklin could not deny that it was a gathering dominated by youth. The average age of those in attendance was 43. The youngest delegate, 27-year-old Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey, was joined by other youthful and experienced thinkers. Some of these young minds were South Carolina's Charles Pinckney, age 29; Alexander Hamilton of New York, age 30; Virginia's 36-year-old James Madison; Edmund Randolph, the 34-year-old governor of Virginia; and Gouverneur Morris, age 35, of Pennsylvania. All of these men would play major roles in the convention. Despite the dominance of youth, the delegates were remarkably experienced in the affairs of their individual states and the loosely-knit nation. 46 had been members of one or both houses of their colonial or state legislatures. Ten had been in attendance at state constitutional conventions, with 16 having served or soon to serve as governors. Included in the convention were 42 delegates to the Continental Congress; eight signers of the Declaration of Independence; six signers of the draft of the Articles of Confederation; and two future presidents of the United States. Although each state was proudly represented, there can be no doubt that the Virginia and Pennsylvania delegations contained the most illustrious figures. For example, the Virginia delegation included: George Washington – The hero of the Revolutionary War, Washington's presence in Philadelphia set a standard of conduct and thinking for others. A good indication of the universal respect for Washington was that, on the first day of the gathering, he was unanimously elected president of the convention. Cite THREE supporting details for the following statement: The delegates to the Constitutional Convention were “an assembly of demigods.” Attach the reading on “An Assembly of Demigods” to page 16. Page 16Page 17 Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

15 “An Assembly of Demigods” Who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? They were, for the most part, considered to be the foremost legal and political minds within the young nation. Thomas Jefferson, serving as U.S. ambassador to France, described the people attending the Constitutional Convention as "an assembly of demigods." What did he mean by this? Each delegate brought to the convention his own concerns and those of his state. The differing perspectives on such issues as representation in the national legislature, the establishment of a national judicial system, and the powers of the executive resulted in repeated deadlocks. All proud men, their convictions were not easily swayed. More than once these divergent (differing) viewpoints threatened to dissolve the convention under a cloud of anger and discord. Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

16 Seventy-four delegates, representing all of the states except Rhode Island (which refused to participate), were named to the Philadelphia convention. However, only 55 attended at one time or another. Of these, only 42 were present at the close of the convention, with three of these refusing to sign the final draft of the U.S. Constitution. By trade, 28 of the delegates were lawyers, nine were planters, and six financiers. Four physicians and four public officials rounded out the group. “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

17 Even at 81 years of age, Philadelphia's own Benjamin Franklin could not deny that it was a gathering dominated by youth. The average age of those in attendance was 43. The youngest delegate, 27-year-old Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey, was joined by other youthful and experienced thinkers. Some of these young minds were South Carolina's Charles Pinckney, age 29; Alexander Hamilton of New York, age 30; Virginia's 36- year-old James Madison; Edmund Randolph, the 34-year-old governor of Virginia; and Gouverneur Morris, age 35, of Pennsylvania. All of these men would play major roles in the convention. “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

18 Despite the dominance of youth, the delegates were remarkably experienced in the affairs of their individual states and the loosely-knit nation. 46 had been members of one or both houses of their colonial or state legislatures. Ten had been in attendance at state constitutional conventions, with 16 having served or soon to serve as governors. Included in the convention were 42 delegates to the Continental Congress; eight signers of the Declaration of Independence; six signers of the draft of the Articles of Confederation; and two future presidents of the United States. Although each state was proudly represented, there can be no doubt that the Virginia and Pennsylvania delegations contained the most illustrious figures. For example, the Virginia delegation included: “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

19 George Washington – The hero of the Revolutionary War, Washington's presence in Philadelphia set a standard of conduct and thinking for others. A good indication of the universal respect for Washington was that, on the first day of the gathering, he was unanimously elected president of the convention. James Madison – Known as the "Father of the Constitution," Madison had developed a comprehensive grasp of political systems throughout history. This knowledge, combined with a quiet but effective leadership, made him particularly well-suited for the task awaiting the delegates in Philadelphia. Perhaps just as importantly, Madison kept detailed notes of the convention's activities, which have provided subsequent generations with a factual account of the proceedings within the closed meetings. Edmund Randolph – Although one of the three delegates who refused to sign the final document, Randolph formally presented to the convention the "large state plan" advocated by fellow Virginian Madison, and later worked in favor of ratification. “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

20 The equally distinguished Pennsylvania delegation included: Benjamin Franklin – The elder statesman of the convention, Franklin was greatly respected and admired by those in attendance. Although not playing a large role in the actual deliberations, his appeals for cooperation and compromise more than once kept the meeting from dissolving in chaos. His role as a stabilizing influence cannot be downplayed. Gouverneur Morris – As chairman of the convention's Committee on Style, he was largely responsible for the final wording of the Constitution. It was his job, and that of his committee, to incorporate the desires of the assembly into precise language. “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

21 However, behind the luster (shine) associated with this gathering of the nation's most famous names, dark clouds loomed. To many delegates, the purpose of the convention – to revise the Articles of Confederation – was nothing less than an attempt to subjugate (force) the individual states to the will of a strong national government. It was just such a belief that kept away another famous American, Patrick Henry. The five-term governor of Virginia was originally chosen as a delegate to the convention, but declined to serve. Many other delegates who agreed to serve in Philadelphia eventually gave up, stymied by frustration. The diversity among delegates at the Philadelphia convention of 1787 would appear to have been a great weakness but instead it was to result in a document addressing the concerns of all – not just the majority. That commitment to the rights of all is a standard which the Constitution continues to meet today. “An Assembly of Demigods” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

22 ? ? ? “An Assembly of Demigods” Thomas Jefferson “An Assembly of Demigods” So, who were these men called to Philadelphia during that scorching summer of 1787? Complete the concept web for “An Assembly of Demigods.” ? ? ? 15 R Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

23 Leaders Courageous Intelligent “An Assembly of Demigods” Thomas Jefferson Average age 42 Oldest – Benjamin Franklin, 81 Youngest – Jonathan Dayton, 27 Lawyers - 28 Planters - 9 Bankers - 6 Doctors - 4 Public Officials - 4 best legal and political minds different viewpoints Experienced in affairs of the nation 15 R Open- Minded Well-educated Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

24 15 R Read Section, “The Delegates,” pages , and explain: “the delegates were,… the well-bred, the well-fed, the well-read, and the well-wed.” Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

25 Who is known as the “Father of the Constitution”? Why was he given this title? Additional Class Notes James Madison of Virginia  Known as the “Father of the Constitution”  Involved and influential with the discussion of many issues  Took notes on the convention which covered more than 600 printed pages 15 R Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

26 I NFORMATIVE P ARAGRAPH on THE D ELEGATES Using the “Four Square” model, write an informative paragraph on the delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia during the summer of R Attach the writing prompt and assignment. Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

27 Topic Sentence Support #2 Sentence Concluding Sentence Support #1 Sentence Support #3 Sentence Details Transition Hook Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods

28 Topic Sentence Support #2 Sentence Concluding Sentence Support #1 Sentence Support #3 Sentence Details Transition Hook Lesson 7: The Constitutional Convention – An Assembly of Demigods


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