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Kao, Shin-Mei National Cheng Kung University Taiwan, R.O.C. Performance assessment: A collaborative process to facilitate learning in the ESP classroom.

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Presentation on theme: "Kao, Shin-Mei National Cheng Kung University Taiwan, R.O.C. Performance assessment: A collaborative process to facilitate learning in the ESP classroom."— Presentation transcript:

1 Kao, Shin-Mei National Cheng Kung University Taiwan, R.O.C. Performance assessment: A collaborative process to facilitate learning in the ESP classroom

2 I. Introduction Linking ESP classroom assessment with professional requirements in real-life  The nature of professional communication Who are the target speakers of English in professional fields?

3 I. Introduction  The nature of professional communication What kinds of communication do target users adopt? one-way vs. two-way communication mode

4 I. Introduction  The natures of one-way communications: unidirectional information transmission; interruption not allowed; planned speech  Examples: business report project presentation announcement

5 I. Introduction  The natures of two-way communications: bi-directional information exchanges; turn- taking; interruption; overlaps; negotiation; hesitation; repairs  Examples: business discussion Q&A after presentation customer inquiry

6 I. Introduction Figure 1. Two-dimensional classification of professional discourses

7 I. Introduction Written discourses are usually one-way, planned, and recursive, with more predictable and formal style than oral discourses. Ambiguity, mistakes, or corrections are NOT permitted, nor tolerated. Examples: journal articles, books, manuals, handbooks, SOP instructions; brochures, advertisements, posters, timetables, memos, s, notes….

8 I. Introduction What does effective communication mean within a professional domain?  Content, shared genres, vocabulary, usages, etc.  ELF intelligibility  Compensation strategies These features should be included in the evaluation scheme.

9 II. Four Steps for Collaborative Evaluation Traditional teacher-centered evaluation does not work in an ESP classroom. Authoritative evaluation does not reflect the facts: 1.In reality, one is judged by the superiors, co- workers, clients, or business partners. 2.The language teacher is NOT eligible to evaluate the content area of the students’ works. 3.The students must be critical for their own works.

10 II. Four Steps for Collaborative Evaluation Use collaborative evaluation in an ESP classroom Collaboration between:  The instructor (as a language specialist) and the students (as participants with content knowledge)  The students themselves (as participants and feedback providers)

11 II. Four Steps for Collaborative Evaluation Step 1. Analyze the critical elements of the target genre or discourse to form the evaluation criteria. Step 2. Develop evaluation rubrics with detailed guidelines for the designated task. Step 3. Involve students in group evaluation and design a feedback sharing session. Step 4. Enforce revisions based on the feedback.

12 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries

13 Taking part in a design critique is a frequent task for novices. Theme: Participating in The Red Dot Design Award

14 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Step 1. Genre analysis. Evaluating the entry form.  Registration form + written description of the work https://www.myreddot.de/reddot/pages/frontend/register.xhtml;jsessionid=00018A55F0363F6E0 0155AF B2 Registration form = personal data + contact details Requirements facts + accuracy

15 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Requirements for written description 1. Does the presentation: have a brief description of the product? tell the jury what the product can do or the solution it provides? point out the innovation or novelty of the product? have pictures of the product? have a use scenario? (if the product solves a complex problem)

16 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries 2. If it is relevant, does it: include the technology or material behind the product? have information on how it can be produced? describe why it is important or why it is the next trend?

17 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries 3. Format requirements: 5 pages or less, A3 sized, portrait orientation (42cm height x 29.7 cm width), 1 page = 1 file, jpg format only, each page is less or equal to 2Mb in size, font size: at least 12 points, text is clear and readable, bottom left corner: page numbers and total number of pages, and NO organization logo, NO designers’ names, NO designers’ pictures.

18 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Group Task: Come up with a list of evaluable requirements. For example: 1.Description of the product. 2.Solutions provided. 3.Novelty of the product. 4.Use scenario. 5.Clear and understandable English. 6.Fixed format

19 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Why do they win the prizes? Content (design) + clear presentation CardioCare Cardiac Rehabilitation Monitor System 2014 Red Dot Award exhibition/work/?lang=en&code= &y=2014&c=167&a=0

20 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Description: The CardioCare measures heart rate variability (HRV) and changes in heart frequency. The system combines elastic electrode material with straps made of a comfortable knit fabric to support the sternum. The system fits snugly to the body and is thus unobtrusive when worn. It uses Bluetooth connectivity to transmit signals to an app, allowing users to manage their health data themselves. Description of the product. Description of the product Solutions Novelty

21 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Lexical Analysis of the text Use Compleat Lexical Tutor to analyze the lexical sophistication and lexical density.

22 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Lexical Analysis of the text Use Compleat Lexical Tutor

23 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Group task 1  Fill in the personal entry form in group Group task 2  Develop a written description for an imaginative (or exiting) product.

24 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Step 2. Set up detailed evaluation rubrics Remind the students about the 6 requirements: 1 – 4 = content requirements 5 = accuracy requirement 6 = format requirement

25 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Group Task: Students propose how to score the 6 categories and explain their reasons. use the Liker scale? e.g., excellent, good, fair, poor, … use a holistic scoring? e.g., 89, 67,… use categorical scoring? e.g., 20%, 15%, …

26 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Step 3. Evaluate the written description in small groups. Group Task 1: Exchange the entry forms for evaluation. Group Task 2: Exchange the written descriptions for evaluation. Comment on sub-categories Verify if all the format forms are kept.

27 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Difficulty: The students may lack the abilities to judge what “clear” English is. Provide helping tips: Do you understand what it is written? Write down questions besides the ambiguous sentences/expressions. Provide your interpretations of the problematic sentences.

28 III. An Example of English for Creative Industries Step 4. Revision. Group/individual task: Revise the entry form and the written description according to the feedbacks of other groups. Individual revision promotes more personal efforts.

29 IV. Final Remarks  Involve the students at all stages, including selecting evaluation items and scoring.  Encourage debates and negotiation during group discussion.  Always question their own and others’ works before publication/presentation.  Give credits to the students’ comments and evaluation; e.g., 50/50 between the teacher’s and the students’ scores.

30 Questions and Comments? Thank you!


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