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Welcome Directors and Assistant Directors Fall Sexual Misconduct Prevention Program Training.

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1 Welcome Directors and Assistant Directors Fall Sexual Misconduct Prevention Program Training

2 Development Group Erin Beach- Student Disability Services Sarah Locklair- FIRST Program Liz Woods- Graduate Community Director Erin Beach- Student Disability Services Sarah Locklair- FIRST Program Liz Woods- Graduate Community Director

3 Training Purpose To revamp our sexual misconduct prevention training for staff To be more intentional in sexual misconduct prevention programming and initiatives To utilize our available human resources, functional areas, and technology in an effort to educate our campus community in a way that prevents sexual misconduct To revamp our sexual misconduct prevention training for staff To be more intentional in sexual misconduct prevention programming and initiatives To utilize our available human resources, functional areas, and technology in an effort to educate our campus community in a way that prevents sexual misconduct 80% of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of 30. [1]

4 Training Tasks To share this information with your staff within one month of today’s date For each department or office to develop and implement a sexual misconduct prevention program or initiative once a semester To share this information with your staff within one month of today’s date For each department or office to develop and implement a sexual misconduct prevention program or initiative once a semester

5 Campus Demographics Updates 27,507 Total Students Caucasian/White: 53% African American/Black: 17% Asian/Pacific Islander: 11% Hispanic/Latino: 9% International: 6% Native American: 4%

6 Campus Demographics Updates 27,507 Total Students Male: 57% Female: 41% Other: 2%

7 Myth or Fact ? [2] “All rapists are strangers.” “Men can’t be raped, only women can.” “If she was drunk, then she was asking for it. ” “Lesbians or gay men deserve to get raped because of their lifestyle.” “All rapists are strangers.” “Men can’t be raped, only women can.” “If she was drunk, then she was asking for it. ” “Lesbians or gay men deserve to get raped because of their lifestyle.”

8 Changing Myths to Facts [2, 3, 4] Why & How? Our institution cannot be afraid to address sexual misconduct topics, this means providing students with knowledge that is always accessible. The best way to connect with our millennial students is through social media outlets. Why & How? Our institution cannot be afraid to address sexual misconduct topics, this means providing students with knowledge that is always accessible. The best way to connect with our millennial students is through social media outlets.

9 Utilizing Social Media as a Prevention Tool The concept is to acknowledge the misconception and then provide the accurate information for the students within the social media posting. For example, a student will most likely surf Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram before or during their evening activities. The sexual violence information or statistic post will be fresh in their minds throughout the evening, making them more likely to contemplate their sexual conduct. The concept is to acknowledge the misconception and then provide the accurate information for the students within the social media posting. For example, a student will most likely surf Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram before or during their evening activities. The sexual violence information or statistic post will be fresh in their minds throughout the evening, making them more likely to contemplate their sexual conduct.

10 A Sample Tweet From Campus Safety [2]

11 Who Should Post on the Social Media Sites? The myths into facts movement should not be left to a single functional area, task force, or specific personnel. Sexual misconduct occurs within every student group and population, it would be most effective if every functional area on campus was expected to join the effort. The goal is to publish content on social media sites that resonates with diverse groups. For example, fraternity and sorority life or a minority/multicultural program would have access to post information that is specifically relevant to their student groups. Nonetheless, the entire student population would learn from the posting. The myths into facts movement should not be left to a single functional area, task force, or specific personnel. Sexual misconduct occurs within every student group and population, it would be most effective if every functional area on campus was expected to join the effort. The goal is to publish content on social media sites that resonates with diverse groups. For example, fraternity and sorority life or a minority/multicultural program would have access to post information that is specifically relevant to their student groups. Nonetheless, the entire student population would learn from the posting.

12 Where do We Start with the Social Media Tool? Department heads or directors should appoint a staff member from their area to be responsible for ensuring their areas’ contributions to the site. It crucial to market and advertise accordingly so that all students have access to or “follow” the sites Introduce the sites at orientation, encourage functional areas and programs to market the sites to their specific student populations Broadcast the sites’ links on institution websites, campus televisions, and fliers Create a #hashtag unique to our institution and encourage students to retweet, share, or repost the content Department heads or directors should appoint a staff member from their area to be responsible for ensuring their areas’ contributions to the site. It crucial to market and advertise accordingly so that all students have access to or “follow” the sites Introduce the sites at orientation, encourage functional areas and programs to market the sites to their specific student populations Broadcast the sites’ links on institution websites, campus televisions, and fliers Create a #hashtag unique to our institution and encourage students to retweet, share, or repost the content

13 Defining Consent What is CONSENT? Consent is positive cooperation in an act to do something (permission). It is voluntary, agreed upon by both parties, and wanted by both individuals. Both parties must have knowledge of nature of the act Person giving consent cannot be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, unconscious, or have a physical or mental impairment that would inhibit their understanding of the act Current or previous dating relationships do not constitute consent No grey areas - consent can be withdrawn at any time What is CONSENT? Consent is positive cooperation in an act to do something (permission). It is voluntary, agreed upon by both parties, and wanted by both individuals. Both parties must have knowledge of nature of the act Person giving consent cannot be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, unconscious, or have a physical or mental impairment that would inhibit their understanding of the act Current or previous dating relationships do not constitute consent No grey areas - consent can be withdrawn at any time In 1 in 3 sexual assaults, the perpetrator was intoxicated. [1]

14 Educating Our Campus About Consent Threats/sexual harassment will not be tolerated inside or outside of the classroom Sexual Assault needs to be considered a priority campus-wide Departmental/office semester programing 27,500 Reasons Campaign – there are 27,500 students, let’s ensure they are all reached! Allocate appropriate funding for programs On campus tabling at events “Stay Safe” tweets and programs Training for supervisors, staf and faculty TAs, GAs, staff, and/or faculty members are not to engage in any type of sexual relationship with an undergraduate student Threats/sexual harassment will not be tolerated inside or outside of the classroom Sexual Assault needs to be considered a priority campus-wide Departmental/office semester programing 27,500 Reasons Campaign – there are 27,500 students, let’s ensure they are all reached! Allocate appropriate funding for programs On campus tabling at events “Stay Safe” tweets and programs Training for supervisors, staf and faculty TAs, GAs, staff, and/or faculty members are not to engage in any type of sexual relationship with an undergraduate student Follow the 3 D’s to Prevention: Direct, Delegate, Distract

15 How Do We Demonstrate Consent? [5] Campus events and initiatives! Some examples are listed below: Present skits at orientation, such as “No Zebras, No Excuses” Visibility of Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Teams on campus Resources available in campus restrooms Regular programing within the residence halls (departmental collaborations) Introducing Green Dot programs to campus Campus events and initiatives! Some examples are listed below: Present skits at orientation, such as “No Zebras, No Excuses” Visibility of Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Teams on campus Resources available in campus restrooms Regular programing within the residence halls (departmental collaborations) Introducing Green Dot programs to campus

16 Prevention Takes Efforts from the Entire Community Protection of survivors and future prevention of sexual misconduct requires the commitment of our campus community. Through involving the community as a whole, campus culture can gradually be reinvented while also creating a more informed student population. Protection of survivors and future prevention of sexual misconduct requires the commitment of our campus community. Through involving the community as a whole, campus culture can gradually be reinvented while also creating a more informed student population.

17 Where to Start in the Community? Creative educational efforts inside and outside of the classroom will yield a more informed and protected student body. 84% of the women who reported sexually coercive experiences experienced the incident during their first four semesters on campus. [1]

18 Prevention: Outside the Classroom An initial starting point for educating students is upon their arrival to campus: Orientation. Inclusion of the topic of sexual misconduct into orientation week sends a strong message: First, our campus is not afraid to address this topic; we encourage dialogue. Second, our campus does not promote a sexual violence culture. Lastly, orientation is the first setting in which students begin identifying and building their new and safe community. Orientation is only one functional area that has the means to promote prevention of sexual violence outside of the classroom. An initial starting point for educating students is upon their arrival to campus: Orientation. Inclusion of the topic of sexual misconduct into orientation week sends a strong message: First, our campus is not afraid to address this topic; we encourage dialogue. Second, our campus does not promote a sexual violence culture. Lastly, orientation is the first setting in which students begin identifying and building their new and safe community. Orientation is only one functional area that has the means to promote prevention of sexual violence outside of the classroom.

19 Prevention: Inside the Classroom The prevalence and seriousness of sexual violence on college campus’ has earned the topic a place in classroom curriculum. For example, freshmen class seminars are the ideal environment to address the realities of sexual misconduct among students. Courses such as these already exist, allowing our institution to utilize resources that are already in place. The prevalence and seriousness of sexual violence on college campus’ has earned the topic a place in classroom curriculum. For example, freshmen class seminars are the ideal environment to address the realities of sexual misconduct among students. Courses such as these already exist, allowing our institution to utilize resources that are already in place.

20 Using Freshman Seminar Classes Recruit and train facilitators to act out scenarios, lead dialogue, and speak to students once class is over. Make freshman seminar a safe place to discuss sexual violence. Allow facilitators to act out scenarios that encourage dialogue. Allow facilitators to guide dialogue and answer questions. Be prepared for students to approach facilitators afterwards with their stories. Recruit and train facilitators to act out scenarios, lead dialogue, and speak to students once class is over. Make freshman seminar a safe place to discuss sexual violence. Allow facilitators to act out scenarios that encourage dialogue. Allow facilitators to guide dialogue and answer questions. Be prepared for students to approach facilitators afterwards with their stories.

21 Creativity Inside and Outside of the Classroom Whether through programming or classroom curriculum, creativity is needed to engage students any topic. Both environments create an opportune time to address topics such as the bystander effect and/or commonly mistaken sexual misconduct, such as stalking or rape by a previous or current partner Creativity is not giving students a text to read or bombarding them with statistics Students, especially underclassmen, need actual examples of appropriate conduct that they can visualize. Creative approaches to these topics include skits, videos, and/or scenarios. For example, material may include what it looks like when a female is hesitant to leave a party with a male but he coerces her into leaving with him anyway Whether through programming or classroom curriculum, creativity is needed to engage students any topic. Both environments create an opportune time to address topics such as the bystander effect and/or commonly mistaken sexual misconduct, such as stalking or rape by a previous or current partner Creativity is not giving students a text to read or bombarding them with statistics Students, especially underclassmen, need actual examples of appropriate conduct that they can visualize. Creative approaches to these topics include skits, videos, and/or scenarios. For example, material may include what it looks like when a female is hesitant to leave a party with a male but he coerces her into leaving with him anyway

22 Accommodating the Needs of Survivors Creating a campus environment that welcomes disclosure and educates students, faculty, and staff about disclosure Orientation Freshman seminar classes Academic advisors Counseling services Housing Fraternity and Sorority Life Creating a campus environment that welcomes disclosure and educates students, faculty, and staff about disclosure Orientation Freshman seminar classes Academic advisors Counseling services Housing Fraternity and Sorority Life More than half of raped college women tell no one of their victimization. [1]

23 Educate Students about Where to Go for Help Counseling center Ensures confidentiality Coping with emotional and mental effects Student Disability Services In-Class Accommodations available with adequate documentation Housing staff Counseling center Ensures confidentiality Coping with emotional and mental effects Student Disability Services In-Class Accommodations available with adequate documentation Housing staff Between 20% and 25% of women will experience a completed and/or attempted rape during their college career. [1] Campus Police To Press Charges For legal consult For escort services Health Services For physical care For rape kits

24 Accommodating the Needs of Survivors Training all faculty & staff members, RA’s, TA’s, GA’s, etc. about how to respond if faced with a disclosure situation or if they suspect something may have happened Confidentiality Policies for pressing charges Importance of hospital visit Training all faculty & staff members, RA’s, TA’s, GA’s, etc. about how to respond if faced with a disclosure situation or if they suspect something may have happened Confidentiality Policies for pressing charges Importance of hospital visit Only about 2% of all sexual assault accusations reported to police turn out to be false. This is the same rate of false reporting as other types of violent crimes. [1]

25 College Women are Not the Only Population at Risk 38% of college-aged women who have been sexually victimized while in college had first been victims prior to entering college, making past victimization the best predictor of future victimization. [1] Persons with a disability had an age-adjusted rate of rape or sexual assault that was more than twice the rate for persons without a disability. [1] Myth: Sexual assault is a topic that only concerns women, and men do not have to be concerned about sexual assault. Fact: According to recent rape crisis center statistics, men, both straight and gay, suffered 10 percent of the sexual assaults reported in the United States last year. In addition, men have wives, friends, sisters, mothers and daughters who may someday need assistance in coping with sexual assault. Rape is a concern for everyone. [6]

26 College Women are Not the Only Population at Risk 42% of gay, lesbian and bisexual university students in one sample reported they had been forced to have sex against their will compared to 21% of heterosexual students in the same study. [7] While 80% of reported rapes are against white women, minorities are more likely to be assaulted. Rates of rape: White-17.7%, Black: 18.8%, Asian/Pacific Islander-6.8%, American Indian/Alaskan Women-34.1%, Mixed Race-24.4%. The stats for non-whites are probably low, since barriers to reporting would be increased for women of color. [7]

27 Ensuring the Rights of Those Accused Fair treatment of the accused Right to privacy Right to be informed in writing Given access to campus resources such as the Counseling & Health Center, and Campus Safety Presumed innocent unless proven responsible Right to attend classes and campus events unless proven guilty Right to due process and a fair trial Given the opportunity to have a representative/lawyer/advisor Due process will protect the rights of the accused Steps should be taken so the accused is not harassed Confidentiality We will strive for confidentiality for both the victim and the alleged Fair treatment of the accused Right to privacy Right to be informed in writing Given access to campus resources such as the Counseling & Health Center, and Campus Safety Presumed innocent unless proven responsible Right to attend classes and campus events unless proven guilty Right to due process and a fair trial Given the opportunity to have a representative/lawyer/advisor Due process will protect the rights of the accused Steps should be taken so the accused is not harassed Confidentiality We will strive for confidentiality for both the victim and the alleged Approximately 2/3 of assaults are committed by someone known to the victim. [1]

28 Ensuring the Rights of the Accused: Things to Keep in Mind [8,9,10] The main goal of the judicial affairs committee is to maintain and promote a safe, respectful, and open campus community Hearing Panel should be impartial and adequately trained on sexual violence Should forensic evidence become available, it should be reviewed by a trained professional An appeals process should be made available to the accused, if deemed necessary Student has the right to be assisted in their defense The burden of proof should rest upon the officials bringing the charge Responsibility established by preponderance of the evidence standard The main goal of the judicial affairs committee is to maintain and promote a safe, respectful, and open campus community Hearing Panel should be impartial and adequately trained on sexual violence Should forensic evidence become available, it should be reviewed by a trained professional An appeals process should be made available to the accused, if deemed necessary Student has the right to be assisted in their defense The burden of proof should rest upon the officials bringing the charge Responsibility established by preponderance of the evidence standard

29 Ensuring the Rights of the Accused: Things to Keep in Mind [8,9,10] Accused should be given opportunity to testify, present evidence, and to hear and question witnesses Accused should NOT be allowed to question an alleged victim directly, but may relay questions through a hearing officer/panel Accused is given the right to “plead the 5th” A full hearing should be given before a decision is made Student must be made aware of all decisions made on their behalf Accused should be given opportunity to testify, present evidence, and to hear and question witnesses Accused should NOT be allowed to question an alleged victim directly, but may relay questions through a hearing officer/panel Accused is given the right to “plead the 5th” A full hearing should be given before a decision is made Student must be made aware of all decisions made on their behalf

30 Ensuring the Rights of the Accused: Things to Keep in Mind Counseling Services May require or request that alleged attend counseling sessions pre or post-trial May assist alleged with any issues of anger, hurt, sadness, trauma, etc. from the past that may have provoked sexual assault/violent behavior Provide resources for dangerous behaviors, alcohol and drug abuse Campus Safety Take action to prevent harassment or violence to/against the accused Relocate the accused student from their current housing assignment, if deemed necessary Counseling Services May require or request that alleged attend counseling sessions pre or post-trial May assist alleged with any issues of anger, hurt, sadness, trauma, etc. from the past that may have provoked sexual assault/violent behavior Provide resources for dangerous behaviors, alcohol and drug abuse Campus Safety Take action to prevent harassment or violence to/against the accused Relocate the accused student from their current housing assignment, if deemed necessary

31 Action Steps Please share reports within the next month of how you presented this information to your staff You and your staff are expected to develop and implement a sexual misconduct prevention program or initiative once a semester Your program reports will be due by the last business day of each month. The program reports should include: the progress of program planning any programs your staff attended any plans for future programs the results of any implemented programs or any other pertinent information. We will meet again at the beginning of the spring semester to provide updates and check in on how everyone’s programs are going Please share reports within the next month of how you presented this information to your staff You and your staff are expected to develop and implement a sexual misconduct prevention program or initiative once a semester Your program reports will be due by the last business day of each month. The program reports should include: the progress of program planning any programs your staff attended any plans for future programs the results of any implemented programs or any other pertinent information. We will meet again at the beginning of the spring semester to provide updates and check in on how everyone’s programs are going

32 References and Resources [1] [2] [3] violence [4] [5] [6] myths-and-fachttp://rwu.edu/campus-life/health-counseling/counseling-center/sexual-assault/rape- myths-and-fac [7] [8] [9]http://www.nacua.org/onlinecourses/title_ix_coordinator_training_2012/docs/ReviewSexu alAssaultPolicy_Feb2012.pdf [10] [1] [2] [3] violence [4] [5] [6] myths-and-fachttp://rwu.edu/campus-life/health-counseling/counseling-center/sexual-assault/rape- myths-and-fac [7] [8] [9]http://www.nacua.org/onlinecourses/title_ix_coordinator_training_2012/docs/ReviewSexu alAssaultPolicy_Feb2012.pdf [10]

33 Thank you for attending! The floor is now open for questions, comments, concerns, and suggestions.


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