Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

“ Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "“ Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s."— Presentation transcript:

1 “ Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s Conference “ Every School a Great School” Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s Conference, SA Monday and Tuesday, 18 th and 19 th October 2010 Professor David Hopkins

2 Overview of Workshop – Day One Session One – Every School a Great School - The Big Picture of School Reform Professional Discussion – Moral purpose, systemic reform and the four drivers for improvement Professional Activity – SWOT analysis Session Two – The Challenge of Leadership Professional Discussion – Effective leadership practices that relate to enhanced student learning, change agent skills and managing adaptive challenges Professional Activity – School and classroom level conditions scales Session Three – The Pedagogy of Personalised Learning Professional Discussion – Personalised learning, the instructional core and a framework for teaching Professional Activity – Models of teaching jigsaw

3 Overview of Workshop – Day Two Session One – Professional learning and development Professional Discussion – Differentiated approaches to professional development, classroom observation strategies and developing capacity through the school improvement team Professional Activity – Classroom observation activity Session Two – Taking school improvement to scale Professional Discussion – Intelligent accountability, networking and systemic reform Professional Activity – Strategies for assessing regional capacity Session Three – Developing our school improvement journeys Professional Discussion – Developing a school improvement or networking action plan based on the SWOT analysis Professional Activity – Presentations of school or network plans

4 Session One Every School a Great School – The Big Picture of School Reform

5

6

7 Moral Purpose of Schooling All these …. whatever my background, whatever my abilities, wherever I start from I know how I am being assessed and what I need to do to improve my work I know what my learning objectives are and feel in control of my learning My parents are involved with the school and I feel I belong here I enjoy using ICT and know how it can help my learning I can get the job that I want I know if I need extra help or to be challenged to do better I will get the right support I know what good work looks like and can help myself to learn I can work well with and learn from many others as well as my teacher I can get a level 4 in English and Maths before I go to secondary school I get to learn lots of interesting and different subjects

8 Life Scripts and Adventure We all have life scripts, some of us chose to develop it others are forced to do so. Life scripts evolve as the individual confronts direct experience and adapts and assimilates it with their self. Adventure as the purest form of direct experience has the ability to develop ‘life script’ in the most immediate way. ‘Adventure leaders’ create situations where others can develop their own life scripts. As Mahatma Gandhi said – ‘You must be the change you wish to see in the world’

9 The G100 Communique A group of 100 principals from fourteen countries (G100) met at the National Academy of Education Administration (NAEA) in Beijing, China October 2006 to discuss the transformation of and innovation in the world’s education systems. They concluded their communique in this way - We need to ensure that moral purpose is at the fore of all educational debates with our parents, our students, our teachers, our partners, our policy makers and our wider community. We define moral purpose as a compelling drive to do right for and by students, serving them through professional behaviors that ‘raise the bar and narrow the gap’ and through so doing demonstrate an intent, to learn with and from each other as we live together in this world.

10 High Excellence High Equity – Raising the Bar and Narrowing the Gap Source: OECD (2001) Knowledge and Skills for Life Low excellence Low equity High excellence Low equity Low excellence High equity High excellence High equity U.K. Belgium U.S. Germany Switzerland Poland Spain Korea Finland Japan Canada Mean performance in reading literacy 200 – Variance (variance OECD as a whole = 100)

11 Ingredients of successful systems from the PISA studies Systematic and equitable funding Universal standards - mirrored in the views of students, parents and school principals School autonomy Mix of accountability systems - internal and external Continuous monitoring of standards and quick interventions when failure to achieve them is identified Creating the appropriate environment to achieve the standards set get the right people to become teachers develop teachers into effective instructors (PD internal and external) place incentives and differentiated support systems to ensure that every child get the supported that it need Focus on the curriculum and introduce skills required for the 21 st Century Networking and innovation Excellence and equity are achievable!

12 ‘Every School a Great School’ as an expression of moral purpose What parents want is for their local school to be a great school. (National Association of School Governors; Education and Skills Select Committee 2004). The three system leadership commitments: primacy of student learning and achievement; relentless focus on reducing within school variation; collaborative working to eradicate between school variation and enhance social equity.

13 plus dominated "Formal" Professional control "Informal" Standards and accountability NLNS Brief History of Standards in Primary Schools

14

15

16 4

17 Distribution of Reading Achievement in 9-10 year olds in Sweden Netherlands England Bulgaria Latvia Canada (Ontario,Quebec) Lithuania Hungary United States Italy Germany Czech Republic New Zealand Scotland Singapore Russian Federation Hong Kong SAR France Greece Slovak Republic Iceland Romania Israel Slovenia International Avg. Norway Cyprus Moldova, Rep of Turkey Macedonia, Rep of Colombia Argentina Iran, Islamic Rep of Kuwait Morocco Belize Source: PIRLS 2001 International Report: IEA’s Study of Reading Literacy Achievement in Primary Schools

18 Ambitious Standards Devolved responsibility Good data and clear targets Access to best practice and quality professional development Accountability Intervention in inverse proportion to success High Challenge High Support New Labour Policy Framework

19 Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or above in Key Stage 2 tests English Maths Test changes in 2003 Major changes to writing test/markscheme Significant changes to maths papers Percentage

20 The Key Question - how do we get there? Most agree that: When standards are too low and too varied some form of direct state intervention is necessary the impact of this top-down approach is usually to raise standards. But when: progress plateaus - while a bit more might be squeezed out in some schools, and perhaps a lot in underperforming schools, one must question whether this is still the recipe for sustained reform there is a growing recognition that to ensure that every student reaches their potential, schools need to lead the next phase of reform. The 64k dollar question is how do we get there?

21 Towards system wide sustainable reform Every School a Great School National Prescription Schools Leading Reform Building Capacity Prescription Professionalism System Leadership

22 Professional Discussion How do you define ‘moral purpose’ in your school? Do you agree with this analysis of system reform?

23 Four key drivers to raise achievement and build capacity for the next stage of reform i. Personalising Learning ii. Professionalising Teaching iii. Building Intelligent Accountability iv. Networking and Collaboration

24 Learning to Learn Curriculum choice & entitlement Assessment for learning Student Voice ‘My Tutor’ Interactive web-based learning resource enabling students to tailor support and challenge to their needs and interests. (i) Personalising Learning ‘Joined up learning and teaching’

25 Enhanced repertoire of learning & teaching strategies Evidence based practice with time for collective inquiry Collegial & coaching relationships Tackle within school variation ‘The Edu-Lancet’ A peer-reviewed journal published for practitioners by practitioners & regularly read by the profession to keep abreast of R&D. (ii) Professionalising Teaching ‘Teachers as researchers, schools as learning communities’

26 Moderated teacher assessment and AfL at all levels ‘Bottom-up’ targets for every child and use of pupil performance data Value added data to help identify strengths / weaknesses Rigorous self-evaluation linked to improvement strategies and school profile to demonstrate success ‘Chartered examiners’ Experienced teachers gain certification to oversee rigorous internal assessment as a basis for externally awarded qualifications. (iii) Building Intelligent Accountability ‘Balancing internal and external accountability and assessment’

27 Best practice captured and highly specified Capacity built to transfer and sustain innovation across system Keeping the focus on the core purposes of schooling by sustaining a discourse on teaching and learning Inclusion and Extended Schooling ‘Leading Edge Practice Partnerships’ Schools develop exemplary curriculum and pedagogic practices and share with others (iv) Networking and Collaboration ‘Disciplined innovation, collaboration and building social capital’

28 Networks & Collaboration Personalised Learning Professional Teaching SYSTEM LEADERSHIP Intelligent Accountability 4 drivers mould to context through system leadership

29 System Leadership: A Proposition ‘System leaders’ care about and work for the success of other schools as well as their own. They measure their success in terms of improving student learning and increasing achievement, and strive to both raise the bar and narrow the gap(s). Crucially they are willing to shoulder system leadership roles in the belief that in order to change the larger system you have to engage with it in a meaningful way.’

30 System leaders share five striking characteristics, they: measure their success in terms of improving student learning and strive to both raise the bar and narrow the gap(s). are fundamentally committed to the improvement of teaching and learning. develop their schools as personal and professional learning communities. strive for equity and inclusion through acting on context and culture. understand that in order to change the larger system you have to engage with it in a meaningful way.

31 Professional Discussion How far do the four drivers apply to the your context? Do you agree with this description of system leadership?

32 Professional Activity SWOT Analysis What are the preconditions of improvement in a school? How does a school organize for improvement? What are the key strategies employed to raise achievement? How does professional learning take place? How are cultures changed and developed? How effective is your own school’s approach to improvement?

33 Session Two The Challenge of Leadership

34 In order to understand the current role and contribution of leadership in innovative education institutions I will: Discuss the challenges facing school leaders in OECD countries; Identify six key trends on the future of school leaders in England and relate them to Australia; Report on large scale research that links leadership practices with higher levels of student achievement; Propose ‘System Leadership’ as a core practice for meeting the challenges of contemporary education. The impact of Educational Leadership and the Emergence of System Leadership The impact of Educational Leadership and the Emergence of System Leadership

35 Background: The OECD Improving School Leadership (ISL) activity Australia Austria Belgium (French) Belgium (Flanders) Chile Denmark Finland France Hungary Ireland Israel Korea The Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Slovenia Spain Sweden United Kingdom (England) United Kingdom (N. Ireland) United Kingdom (Scotland) Network of experts An International Perspective International organisations

36 At the school level, leadership can improve teaching and learning by setting objectives and influencing classroom practice At the local level, school leadership can improve equal opportunities by collaborating with other schools and local communities At the system level, school leadership is essential for successful education reform School leadership: why does it matter? School Leadership

37 The role of leadership has changed dramatically School autonomy: “Running a small business” Administration and management Human and financial resources Accountability for outcomes: A new culture of evaluation Assessment, (self) evaluation, quality assurance, public reporting New approaches to teaching and learning More diverse student populations More emphasis on raising performance of all School leadership: a policy priority Need to invest in the knowledge and skills of leaders on the job

38 More and more tasks have been added to school leaders’ workload. Most of the leadership tasks are carried out by one individual Lack of coherent frameworks to define and distribute the new roles School leadership: the challenges Role expansion & intensification Insufficient preparation and training Most school leaders are former teachers. Experience as a teacher does not guarantee that leaders have the knowledge and skills necessary to run a school Lack of systematic and career-staged training

39 The current workforce is retiring, but few people are interested in moving up to leadership Application numbers are decreasing: 15 out of 22 participating countries report difficulties in finding a sufficient number of qualified candidates School leadership: the challenges Shortages in leadership personnel Unattractive working conditions (1) Barriers to potentially interested candidates: Long working hours Poor work-life balance Inadequate salaries

40 Traditionally most principals had lifelong tenure Inflexible and hierarchical career structures Few opportunities for career development Problems of principal burnout & lack of opportunities to move up to new tasks School leadership: the challenges Unattractive working conditions (2)

41 School leadership: the policy

42 Challenges facing School Leaders in England There are a set of key challenges at the heart of school leadership. These are: ensuring consistently good teaching and learning; integrating a sound grasps of basics knowledge and skills within a broad and balanced curriculum; managing behaviour and attendance; strategically managing resources and the environment; building the school as a professional learning community; and developing partnerships beyond the school to encourage parental support for learning and new learning opportunities. There is also a set of specific contemporary challenges such as: the synergy between standards and welfare; personalisation; the implementation of workforce reform; the impetus for school diversity and parental choice; the progression of particular groups of students.

43 Professional Discussion How far does the OECD research capture the reality of leadership on the Limestone Coast? How similar are the challenges facing school leaders in England similar to those of leaders on the Limestone Coast?

44 ‘Seven Strong Claims about School Leadership’ School leadership is second only to classroom instruction as an influence on student learning. Almost all successful (school) leaders draw on the same repertoire of basic leadership practices. It is the enactment of the same basic leadership practices – not the practices themselves – that is responsive to the context. School leaders improve pupil learning indirectly through their influence on staff motivation and working conditions. School leadership has a greater influence on schools and pupils when it is widely distributed. Some patterns of leadership distribution are much more effective than others. A small handful of personal “traits” explain a high proportion of the variation (such as being open minded, flexible, persistent and optimistic) in leader effectiveness.

45 Setting Directions Redesigning Organisation HT Trust Use of Data Developing People Use of Observation Distributed Leadership Staff SLT Collaboration SLT: L & T Teacher Collaborative Culture Pupil & External Participation Assessment for Learning High Academic Standards Improvement in School Conditions Pupil Motivation & Learning Culture Change in Pupil Behaviour Change in Pupil Attendance Changes in Pupil Academic Outcomes

46 Leadership - Time in post - Internal states - Provision of leadership - Age - Values School - Improvement Group - FSM - Sector - Ethnic Diversity - School size - Urban/rural - Level of deprivation in area Building Vision, Setting Directions Understanding & Developing People -Succession planning -Monitoring and accountability Organisational Redesign -Distributive leadership practices -Correspondenc e with teaching & learning purposes Managing Teaching and Learning - Innovative practices - Use of data Culture & Climate Altered Practices Pedagogic Focus Student & Staff Engagement & Motivation Academic Personal and Social Behaviour Affective Structural Equation Modelling – Connecting Headteacher Effectiveness and Pupil Outcomes Pace / Timing

47 Key Messages Building vision and setting directions 1.The Head is the driver for creating and realising the school’s vision. 2.Creating a clear vision for the school (usually with the support of the SLT). 3.Creating the right conditions for the realisation of the school’s vision: releasing stuff that are reluctant to change; and strategically building the practical blocks for the realisation of the school’s vision (usually with the support of SLT) 4.Propagating the school’s vision.

48 Key Messages Understanding and developing people 1.Most school leaders take succession planning very seriously. 2.Staff motivation is increased when trust between the head teacher and staff is built. 3.School leaders impose strong accountability frameworks and monitor practice. 4.CPD is strategically built, is predominantly delivered internally and is of high quality. 5. Becoming a training school impacts positively on teaching and learning.

49 Key Messages Organisational Re-design 1.All secondary schools have undergone some sort of organisational re-design. 2.Changes are specific to context. 3.The most powerful forms for improving pupil outcomes are: the restructuring of the SLT; the creation of a pastoral team; distributed leadership – some forms as more effective than others; collaborating with other schools, Heads and external agencies - collaboration is most effective when all staff are engaged; and parental engagement.

50 Key Messages Teaching and Learning 1.All schools focus relentlessly on teaching and learning. 2.Managing teaching and learning depends on context and pupil needs 3.A disciplined environment is important for learning. 4.The three part lesson has been instrumental for the initial phases of school improvement. However, to sustain improvement it seems that innovation and risk taking in teaching and learning are required. 5.The use of data, AfL and the systematic tracking of pupil progress improves pupil outcomes. 6.Enrichment activities support students motivation to learn and build up their confidence.

51 Summary – Leadership and Learning 1.Certain leadership practices are effective in all contexts (vision, direction, developing people, distributing leadership, focus on T and L and data driven developments). 2.Effective leaders know when to switch strategies. 3.Leadership levers -are the same but utilised differently in different contexts. 4.Distributed leadership as a means to an end rather than an end in itself. 5.Proximity of leadership practice to learning (instruction) has a positive impact on student outcomes. 6.Effective leaders maximise formal and informal leadership structures and practices. 7.Effective leaders instil norms of school renewal and regeneration.

52 ‘Affluent’ Pupils ‘Deprived’ Pupils Deprivation remains a key determinant of performance at school and pupil level – but It can be done!

53 These Twelve Secondary Schools … Are in the highest category of deprivation (35% or more FSM, yet, they all: Achieve over 80% good GCSE passes at 16, with a consistent trajectory of improvement Have at least two recent inspection reports judged as ‘outstanding’ Received outstanding grades for teaching and learning, leadership and the school overall Record a pattern of high contextual value added scores from Key Stage 2 (age 11) to Key Stage 4 (age 16)

54 They defy the association of poverty with outcomes Yet the scale of challenge faced by these schools is considerable: Higher than average proportion come form poor or disturbed family backgrounds where support for learning and expectation of achievement are low Many students are subject to emotional and psychological tension and regular attendance is a problem They are open to a range of ‘urban ills’ that often characterise poorer communities – drugs and alcohol, peer pressure of gangs and fashion and overt racism which tend to attract behaviour which ranges from anti- social to violent. Getting these students ready and willing to learn is a constant challenge, which the schools strive to meet by providing a better daytime alternative to being at home or on the streets.

55 21 st Century Schools succeed for the following reasons: They excel at what they do not just occasionally but for a high proportion of the time They prove constantly that disadvantage need not be a barrier to achievement They put their students first, invest in their staff and nurture their communities They have strong values and high expectations that are applied consistently and are never relaxed They fulfil individual potential through providing outstanding teaching, rich opportunities for learning and encouragement and support for each student They are highly inclusive, having complete regard for the educational progress, personal development and well being of every student Their achievements do not happen by chance, but by highly reflective, carefully planned and implemented strategies They operate with a very high degree of internal consistency They are constantly looking for ways to improve further They have outstanding and well distributed leadership

56 At the heart of this is outstanding leadership practice The Heads of these schools are not by and large iconic – they have taken on challenging schools out of a deep commitment to improving the lot of their students and communities. Moral purpose may be at the heart of it but successful Heads need a range of attributes and skills if they are to succeed in dealing with the challenges presented by turbulent and complex communities. Clear and unshakeable principles and sense of purpose Vigilance and visibility Courage and conviction Predisposition to immediate action, letting nothing slip Insistence on Consistency of approach, individually and across the organisation Drive and determination Belief in people Ability to communicate leadership by example Emotional intelligence Tireless energy

57 A change for the better … Before the change of head teacher, the school: Was comfortable and happy Had a strong pastoral system although this was reliant on personalities rather than systems Had little culture of change and improvement Had a questionable work ethic Set expectations around happy, well-adjusted students with little discussion of whether they should also achieve higher academic levels Had a well liked head who was easygoing, genial and supportive but not challenging, often absent and who allowed poor staff to remain in post. The new head teacher: Faced initial staff resentment with data; there was a belief that the school was happy and did not need to change Gradually changed the culture over a few years Retained what was good Maintained a relentlessly positive attitude showed high energy Was a lateral thinker, prepared to take a gamble Had a very ‘can do’ attitude and said ‘yes’ wherever possible Was prepared to tackle difficult issues such as weeding out poor staff Trusted and motivated staff Was approachable and relaxed Made good use of promotion to bring alienated staff onside Used the wider senior team to involve more staff as leaders

58 It is not surprising … … that a number of themes emerged which were common to most or all of the schools. These included, for example, attention to the quality of teaching and learning; the assessment and tracking of student’s progress; target-setting, support and intervention; attracting teachers and growing leaders. It is important to stress that the success of these schools is due not simply to what they do but the fact that it is rigorously distilled and applied good practice, cleverly selected and modified to fit the needs of the school. The schools do not value innovation for its own sake, but only when it adds something extra. The practices described here are not ‘off the peg’ tricks; they mesh together and work synchronously.

59 Diana’s Line of Success onward Everyone a leader (2005- present) Creative partnership and creativity Self evaluation Personalised learning 3. Developing creativity ( ) Restructuring leadership Involving community Assessment (personalised) Placing staff well-being at centre of school improvement Broadening horizons 2. Taking ownership: an inclusive agenda (2000–2002) Vision and values: developing school’s mission Distributing leadership Persisting priority on teaching and learning: becoming a thinking school curriculum development Performance management and CPD Inclusivity: integrating students from different social and cultural backgrounds Focus on monitoring and evaluation 1. Coming out of special measures ( ) Enriching teaching and learning environment Making school secure Improving teaching and learning in classrooms Leading by example Establishing a student behaviour policy and improving attendance Vision and values Developing resources Success of leadership in terms of effect upon broad pupil outcomes Ofsted Inspection 1998 (Special Measures) Ofsted Inspection 2002 (Very Good) Ofsted Inspection 2007 (Outstanding)

60 1. Coming out of special measures ( ) Enriching teaching and learning environment Making school secure Improving teaching and learning in classrooms Leading by example Establishing a student behaviour policy and improving attendance Vision and values Developing resources 2. Taking ownership: an inclusive agenda (2000–2002) Vision and values: developing school’s mission Distributing leadership Persisting priority on teaching and learning: becoming a thinking school curriculum development Performance management and CPD Inclusivity: integrating students from different social and cultural backgrounds Focus on monitoring and evaluation 3. Developing creativity ( ) Restructuring leadership Involving community Assessment (personalised) Placing staff well-being at centre of school improvement Broadening horizons 4. Everyone a leader (2005- present) Creative partnership and creativity Self evaluation Personalised learning Success of leadership in terms of effect upon broad pupil outcomes OFSTED and SATs Results

61 Personal Development Strategic Acumen Managing Teaching and Learning Developing People Developing Organisations Work as a Change Agent Lead a Successful Educational Improvement Partnership Moral Purpose Partner another School Facing Difficulties and Improve it Lead and Improve a School in Challenging Circumstances Act as a Community Leader

62 Leadership for Learning Setting direction Total commitment to enable every learner to reach their potential Ability to translate vision into whole school programmes Managing Teaching and Learning Ensure every child is inspired and challenged through personalized learning Develop a high degree of clarity about and consistency of teaching quality Developing people Enable students to become more active learners Develop schools as professional learning communities Developing the organization Create an evidence-based school Extend an organization’s vision of learning to involve networks

63 System Leadership Roles A range of emerging roles, including heads who: develop and lead a successful educational improvement partnership across local communities to support welfare and potential choose to lead and improve a school in extremely challenging circumstances partner another school facing difficulties and improve it. This category includes Executive Heads and leaders of more informal improvement arrangements act as curriculum and pedagogic innovators who develop and then transfer best practice across the system work as change agents or experts leaders as National Leader of Education, School Improvement Partner, Consultant Leader.

64 Professional Discussion How far does the model of system leadership capture the reality of leadership on the Limestone Coast? How far does this approach to leadership mirror the research of Viviane Robinson and her colleagues and your self assessment against their dimensions?

65 Professional Activity School Level Diagnostic Enquiry and Reflection Planning Involvement Staff Development Co-ordination Leadership

66 Session Three The Pedagogy of Personalised Learning

67 Effect Size of Teaching Student Performance 50 th percentile 100 th percentile 0 percentile Age 8 Age 11 Students with high performing teacher Students with low performing teacher 90 th percentile 37 th percentile 53 percentile points McKinsey & Company, 2007:11

68 How the demand for skills has changed Economy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input in the USA (Levy and Murnane) Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution The dilemma of schools: The skills that are easiest to teach and test are also the ones that are easiest to digitise, automate and outsource

69 “What does it mean to be educated?” at any particular phase of education “What does it mean to be educated?” at any particular phase of education Being educated at any particular age has four central elements: a breadth of knowledge gained from a curricula entitlement; a range of skills on a developmental continuum that reflects increasing depth at ages 7, 11, 14,16, and in many cases, 18; a range of learning experiences; a set of key products, projects or artifacts. It also means that students are sufficiently articulate to: sustain employability through basic skills; apply their knowledge and skills in different contexts; choose from and learn in a range of post-14 study (assuming an entitlement curriculum up until then); draw on wider experiences to inform further learning and choice. Most educational systems use examination results as a proxy measure for this range of quality outcomes

70 “All our students will be literate, numerate and curious … “

71 I wrote (with Bruce Joyce) some time ago that: Learning experiences are composed of content, process and social climate. As teachers we create for and with our children opportunities to explore and build important areas of knowledge, develop powerful tools for learning, and live in humanizing social conditions.

72 Powerful Learning … Is the ability of learners to respond successfully to the tasks they are set, as well as the task they set themselves In particular, to: Integrate prior and new knowledge Acquire and use a range of learning skills Solve problems individually and in groups Think carefully about their successes and failures Accept that learning involves uncertainty and difficulty All this has been termed “meta-cognition” – it is the learners’ ability to take control over their own learning processes.

73 A Typology of Skills These skills fall into three categories: Functional Skills: literacy, numeracy and ICT. Thinking and Learning Skills: are the skills young people need to acquire in order to become effective learners. Gaining mastery of these skills equips students to raise their achievement by developing their ability to: improve their achievement by applying a wide range of learning approaches in different subjects; learn how to learn, with the capability to monitor, evaluate, and change the ways in which they think and learn; become independent learners, knowing how to generate their own ideas, acquire knowledge and transfer their learning to different contexts. Personal Skills: are the skills young people need to acquire in order to develop their personal effectiveness. Gaining mastery of these skills equips students to manage themselves and to develop effective social and working relations.

74 Professional Discussion The Key Question What teaching strategies do I and my colleagues have in our repertoires to respond to the student diversity that walks through our classroom doors?

75 Elephant in the Classroom - 1 Confusing people and practice is deeply rooted in the culture of schools, and it is especially resilient because it resides in the beliefs and the language of school people. We speak of ‘gifted’ or ‘natural’ teachers, for example, without ever thinking about the implications of that language for how people improve their practice. If practice is a gift that falls out the sky onto people, then the likelihood that we will improve practice at any scale at all is minimal. There are only so many sunbeams to go around, and there aren’t enough for everyone. That is the first problem.

76 Elephant in the Classroom - 2 The second stems from the first. It is that in education there is no common agreed on shared practices or shared understanding of the cause and effect relationship between teaching and learning. This is not to say that there is no agreement on curriculum content, or that some teachers do not have a clear philosophy about linking teaching to learning. What it is to say is that in teaching one’s practice in the sense we are using it here is based not on taste or style, but rather on evidence and that this practice is open up to public scrutiny and one holds oneself and each other accountable for that practice.

77 Focus on the Instructional Core CURRICULUM POWERFUL POWERFUL LEARNING LEARNING TEACHING and LEARNING STRATEGIES STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

78 Intervening in the ‘Instructional Core’  Increases in student learning occur only as a consequence of improvements in the level of content, teachers’ knowledge and skill and student engagement.  If you change any single element of the instructional core, you have to change the other two to affect student learning.  The tasks students do predict their performance; so the real accountability lies in the tasks the students perform.  We learn to do the work by doing the work: people have to engage in sustained description and analysis of instructional practice before they can acquire either the expertise or the authority to judge it.  In developing a practice around the instructional core - description comes before analysis, analysis before prediction, and prediction before evaluation.

79 What is ‘Professional Practice’? By practice we mean something quite specific. We mean a set of protocols and processes for observing, analyzing, discussing and understanding instruction that can be used to improve student learning at scale. The practice works because it creates a common discipline and focus among practitioners with a common purpose and set of problems. The real insight here is that you can maintain all the values and commitments that make you a person and still give yourself permission to change your practice. Your practice is an instrument for expressing who you are as a professional; it is not who you are.

80 Three ways of thinking about Teaching Teaching Relationships Teaching Models Reflection TeachingSkills

81 Teaching Skills Active teaching Engaged time – ‘time on task’ Structuring information Effective questioning Consistent success And … ???

82 Some Theory of Action Principles When teacher directed instruction becomes more enquiry focused the level of student engagement increases By consistently adopting protocols for teaching and learning student behaviour and engagement is enhanced If teachers use cooperative group structures / techniques to mediate between whole class instruction and students carrying out tasks then the academic performance of the whole class will increase When teachers systematically use higher order questioning the level of student understanding is deepened When feedback contains reference to practical actions student behaiour becomes more positive and consistent When peer assessment (AfL) is consistently utilized student engagement, learning and achievement increases When learning tasks are purposeful, clearly defined, differentiated and challenging, (according to the students Zone of Proximal Development), then the more powerful and precise the learning for all students

83 Teaching Relationships Expectation effects on student achievement are likely to occur both directly through opportunity to learn (differences in the amount and nature of exposure to content and opportunities to engage in various types of academic activities) and indirectly through differential treatment that is likely to affect students' self-concepts, attributional inferences, or motivation. Good, T.L. and Brophy, J.E. (1994) Looking In Classrooms (2nd ed)

84 Teaching Models Our toolbox is the models of teaching, actually models for learning, that simultaneously define the nature of the content, the learning strategies, and the arrangements for social interaction that create the learning contexts of our students. For example, in powerful classrooms students learn models for: Extracting information and ideas from lectures and presentations Memorising information Building hypotheses and theories Attaining concepts and how to invent them Using metaphors to think creatively Working effectively with other to initiate and carry out co-operative tasks

85 Professional Activity Models of Teaching

86 “ Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s Conference “ Every School a Great School” Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s Conference, SA Monday and Tuesday, 18 th and 19 th October 2010 Professor David Hopkins

87 Overview of Workshop – Day Two Session One – Professional learning and development Professional Discussion – Differentiated approaches to professional development, classroom observation strategies and developing capacity through the school improvement team Professional Activity – Classroom observation activity Session Two – Taking school improvement to scale Professional Discussion – Intelligent accountability, networking and systemic reform Professional Activity – Strategies for assessing regional capacity Session Three – Developing our school improvement journeys Professional Discussion – Developing a school improvement or networking action plan based on the SWOT analysis Professional Activity – Presentations of school or network plans

88 Professional Discussion Reflect individually and then share on tables the learning from yesterday’s workshop

89 Session Four Professional learning and development

90 High Excellence High Equity – Raising the Bar and Narrowing the Gap Source: OECD (2001) Knowledge and Skills for Life Low excellence Low equity High excellence Low equity Low excellence High equity High excellence High equity U.K. Belgium U.S. Germany Switzerland Poland Spain Korea Finland Japan Canada Mean performance in reading literacy 200 – Variance (variance OECD as a whole = 100)

91 Three ways of thinking about Teaching Teaching Relationships Teaching Models Reflection TeachingSkills

92 Some Theory of Action Principles When teacher directed instruction becomes more enquiry focused the level of student engagement increases By consistently adopting protocols for teaching and learning student behaviour and engagement is enhanced If teachers use cooperative group structures / techniques to mediate between whole class instruction and students carrying out tasks then the academic performance of the whole class will increase When teachers systematically use higher order questioning the level of student understanding is deepened When feedback contains reference to practical actions student behaiour becomes more positive and consistent When peer assessment (AfL) is consistently utilized student engagement, learning and achievement increases When learning tasks are purposeful, clearly defined, differentiated and challenging, (according to the students Zone of Proximal Development), then the more powerful and precise the learning for all students

93 Teaching Models Our toolbox is the models of teaching, actually models for learning, that simultaneously define the nature of the content, the learning strategies, and the arrangements for social interaction that create the learning contexts of our students. For example, in powerful classrooms students learn models for: Extracting information and ideas from lectures and presentations Memorising information Building hypotheses and theories Attaining concepts and how to invent them Using metaphors to think creatively Working effectively with other to initiate and carry out co-operative tasks

94 Achievement of students Number of students Reaching for the “Double Sigma Effect”

95 Effect Size of Teaching Strategies Information Processing – a mean effect size over 1.0 for higher order outcomes Cooperative Learning – a mean effect between 0.3 to 0.7 Personal Models – a mean effect of 0.3 or more for cognitive, affective and behavioural outcomes Behavioural Models – a mean effect between 0.5 to 1.0. Best representatives are for short term treatments looking at behavioural or knowledge of content outcomes

96 I wrote (with Bruce Joyce) some time ago that: Learning experiences are composed of content, process and social climate. As teachers we create for and with our children opportunities to explore and build important areas of knowledge, develop powerful tools for learning, and live in humanizing social conditions.

97 ‘You must be the change you wish to see in the world’ Leading Change

98 Leadership as Adaptive Work Technical Solutions Adaptive Work Technical problems can be solved through applying existing know how - adaptive challenges create a gap between a desired state and reality that cannot be closed using existing approaches alone System Leadership

99 The Nature of Adaptive Work An adaptive challenge is a problem situation for which solutions lie outside current ways of operating. Adaptive challenges demand learning, because ‘people are the problem’ and progress requires new ways of thinking & operating. Mobilising people to meet adaptive challenges, then, is at the heart of leadership practice. Ultimately, adaptive work requires us to reflect on the moral purpose by which we seek to thrive and demands diagnostic enquiry into the realities we face that threaten the realisation of those purposes. From Ron Heifetz – ‘Adaptive Work’ (in Bentley and Wilsdon 2003)

100 The Ring of Confidence Circles of Competence

101 The ‘Iceberg Model’ of Educational Change Values and Beliefs Behaviours Content & Structures

102 Three Phases of Educational Change Initiation Implementation Institutionalisation Time “The Implementation Dip”

103 Change Agent Skills - Initiation The initiation phase is about deciding to embark on innovation, and of developing commitment towards the process. The key activities in the initiation phase are the decision to start, and a review of the school's current state as regards the particular change. This is a list of factors that make for successful initiation: the innovation should be tied to a local agenda and high profile local need a clear, well-structured approach to change an active advocate or champion who understands the innovation and support it active initiation to start the innovation (top down is OK under certain conditions) good quality innovation

104 Change Agent Skills - Implementation Implementation is the phase of the process that has received the most attention. It is the phase of attempted use of the innovation. The key activities occurring during implementation are the carrying out of action plans, the developing and sustaining of commitment, the checking of progress and overcoming problems. The key factors making for success at this stage are: clear responsibility for orchestration/co-ordination (Head, Co-ordinator, External Consultant). shared control over implementation (top down NOT OK); good cross- hierarchical work and relations; empowerment of both individuals and the school. mix of pressure, insistence on 'doing it right', and support. adequate and sustained staff development and in-service. rewards for teachers early in the process (empowerment, collegiality, meeting needs, classroom help, load reduction, supply cover, expenses, resources).

105 Change Agent Skills - Institutionalisation Institutionalisation is the phase when innovation and change stop being regarded as something new and become part of the school's usual way of doing things. The move from implementation to institutionalisation often involves the transformation of a pilot project, to a school wide initiative, often without the advantage of the previously available funding. Key activities at this stage are: an emphasis on 'embedding' the change within the school’s structures, its organisation and resources the elimination of competing or contradictory practices strong and purposeful links to other change efforts, the curriculum and classroom teaching widespread use in the school and local area an adequate bank of local facilitators, (e.g. advisory teachers) for skills training.

106 Matt Miles on Change Agent Skills TRUST DIAGNOSISPLAN WORKING IN GROUPS KNOWHOW CONFIDENCE TO CONTINUE

107 Change Agent Meta Skills Besides the specific activities required during each of the phases, there are also a series of ‘cross cutting’ or generic skill clusters that characterise the behaviours of effective change agents. to generate trust to understand and diagnose the state of the school’s organisation to plan into the medium term and to see the bigger picture to work productively in groups to access the required technical resources and advice be it research, good practice, or specifications of teaching and learning to give people the confidence to continue.

108 The Experience of Educational Change  change takes place over time;  change initially involves anxiety and uncertainty;  technical and psychological support is crucial;  the learning of new skills is incremental and developmental;  successful change involves pressure and support within a collaborative setting;  organisational conditions within and in relation to the school make it more or less likely that the school improvement will occur.

109 Joined up Professional Development for the Whole Workforce … in Schools Make space and time for ‘deep learning’ and teacher enquiry Use the research on learning and teaching to impact on student achievement Studying classroom practice increases the focus on student learning By working in small groups the whole school staff can become a nurturing unit Invest in school-based processes for improving teacher’s pedagogical content knowledge

110 Make space and time for ‘deep learning’ and teacher enquiry Whole staff PD days on teaching and learning and school improvement planning as well as ‘curriculum tours’ to share the work done in departments or working groups; Inter-departmental meetings to discuss teaching strategies; Workshops run inside the school on teaching strategies by Cadre group members and external support; Partnership teaching and peer coaching; The design and execution of collaborative enquiry activities, which are, by their nature, knowledge-generating.

111 Six Approaches to Staff Development Achieving Consistency Specific Observation Schedules Japanese ‘Lesson Study’ Coaching Instructional Rounds Peer Coaching

112 Achieving Conisistency – The Robert Clack “good lesson” In terms of teaching and learning, three residential courses were held for teachers in the first term of Paul’s headship, out of which emerged the staff-created model of the Robert Clack Good Lesson. Regardless of subject, all departments explain the objective, content and process of each lesson, followed by a summary and a review. A modular curriculum was also introduced, whereby all pupils are tested to National Curriculum standards at each half and end of term in every subject. Not only do teachers know exactly where each pupil stands, but parents get a short and long report each term, which charts their children’s progress and behaviour.

113 Specific Observation Schedules Higher order questions Dealing with low level disruption Wait time Differentiation Level of task Pace etc

114 Japanese “Lesson Study” Choose a research theme Focus the research Create the lesson Teach and observe the lesson Discuss the lesson Revise the lesson Repeat the process with another teacher Disseminate and share the lesson

115 Structuring Staff Development Workshop Understanding of Key Ideas and Principles Modelling and Demonstration Practice in Non-threatening Situations Workplace Immediate and Sustained Practice Collaboration and Peer Coaching Reflection and Action Research With thanks to Bruce Joyce

116 The Instructional Rounds Process The network convenes in a school for a rounds visit hosted by a member or members of the network. The focus of the visit is a problem of practice related to teaching and learning that the school is currently wrestling with. The network divides into smaller group that visit a rotation of four or five classrooms for approximately thirty minutes. In each classroom network participants collect descriptive evidence related to the focus of the problem of practice. After completing the classroom observations, the entire group assembles in a common location to work through a process description, analysis and prediction. The group analyses the evidence for patterns and look at how what they have seen explains or not the observable student performance in the school. Finally the network develops a series of ‘theory of action’ principles from the analysis of the observations and discusses the next level of work recommendations for the school and system to make progress on the problem of practice.

117 Peer Coaching Peer coaching teams of two or three are much more effective than larger groups. These groups are more effective when the entire staff is engaged in school improvement. Peer coaching works better when Heads and Deputies participate in training and practice. The effects are greater when formative study of student learning is embedded in the process.

118 Elmore’s Principles for Large Scale Improvement Maintain a tight instructional focus sustained over time Routinise accountability for practice and performance in face-to-face relationships Reduce isolation and open practice up to direct observation, analysis, and criticism Exercise differential treatment based on performance and capacity, not on volunteerism Devolve increased discretion based on practice and performance

119 Professional Discussion 1.How do you develop a repertoire of teaching models in your school? 2.What exactly is the role of the teacher? 3.What are the implications for staff development? 4.What are the monitoring mechanisms implemented so as to ensure the effectiveness of the model?

120 Professional Activity Classroom Diagnostic Authentic Relationships Boundaries and expectations Planning for Teaching Teaching Repertoire Pedagogic Partnership Reflection on Teaching

121 Session Five Taking school improvement to scale

122 A Framework for School Improvement Priority for School Development Strategy Enhanced Student Learning and Teacher Development Conditions for Classroom Development Conditions for School Development

123 A Three Phase Strategy for School Improvement Phase One: Establishing the Process Phase Two: Going Whole School Phase Three: Sustaining Momentum

124 Phase One: Establishing the Process Commitment to the School Improvement Approach Selection of Learning Leaders and School Improvement Group Enquiring into the Strengths and Weaknesses of the School Designing the Whole School Programme Seeding the Whole School Approach

125 Devise your programme around core values Every school can improve Improvement is assessed in terms of enhanced pupil outcomes Every individual in the school has a contribution to make Start from where the school is, but set high goals Model good practice with precision Raise expectations of what is possible.

126 Preparing for School Improvement Pre-conditionsSchool Level Preparations Unifying FocusMeans  Commitment to School Improvement  General consensus on values  Understanding of key principles  Shared values  A mandate from staff  Leadership potential  Identification of change agents  Willingness to make structural changes  Capacity for improvement Improvement Theme - An enquiry into Teaching and Learning School Improvement Strategy

127 School Improvement Group Development Phase 1 - Uncertainty about focus What is School Improvement? What is the role of the SIG group? Where is it all going? It’s hard to make things happen. Phase 2 - Clearer about focus Using existing structures in new ways, e.g. department meetings with single item research agendas. New ways of working. Beginning to shift from staff development mode to school improvement mode. Phase 3 - Change/renewal of the SIG group Establishment of research culture within the school Involvement of students as researchers The school generates its own theory

128 Phase Two: Going Whole School The Initial Whole School PD Day(s) Establishing the Curriculum and Teaching Focus Establishing the Learning Teams: − Curriculum groupings − Peer coaching or ‘buddy’ groups The Initial Cycle of Enquiry Sharing Initial Success on the Curriculum Tour

129 Curriculum Tour WHOLE SCHOOL DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY An Enquiry into Teaching and Learning Dept. A (Inductive Teaching) Dept. B (Inductive Teaching) Dept C (Inductive Teaching) MemorySynectics Group Work WHOLE SCHOOL WORKING TOWARDS REPERTOIRE OF TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES Stage I Stage II Stage III ‘Curriculum Tour’

130 In addition, SIG members are involved in: Out of school training sessions on capacity building and teaching and learning; The pursuit of their own knowledge in support of their role – about leadership, the management and implementation of change, the design of professional development activities etc.; Planning meetings in school; Consultancy to school working groups; Observation and in-classroom support; Study visits to other schools within the network.

131 Phase Three: Sustaining Momentum Establishing Further Cycles of Enquiry Building Teacher Learning into the Process Sharpening the Focus on Student Learning Finding Ways of Sharing Success and Building Networks Reflecting on the Culture of the School and Department

132 Action Plans for Student Achievement Specific targets related to pupils’ learning, progress and achievement that are clear and unambiguous; Teaching and learning strategies designed to meet the targets; Evidence to be gathered to judge the success in achieving the targets set; Modifications to management arrangements to enable targets to be met; Tasks to be done to achieve the targets set and who is responsible for doing them; Time it will take; How much it will cost in terms of the budget, staff time, staff development and other resources; Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the plan; Evaluating its impact over time.

133 Moving to Scale Cohorts of Schools Members of School Improvement Group Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 PLAN CohortA| | ………………………. CohortB | | ………… CohortC | | ………….....

134 Processes of School Improvement The journey of school improvement A clear reform narrative is created, and seen by staff to be consistently applied, with: a vision and urgency that translates into clear principles for action. Organizing the key strategies Improvement activities are selected and linked together strategically; supported by robust and highly reliable school systems with clear SMT roles in key areas. Professional learning at the heart of the process Improvement strategy informs CPD; knowledge is gained, verified & refined by staff to underpin improvement; networking is used to manage risk and discipline practice. Cultures are changed and developed Professional ethos and values that supports capacity building are initiated, implemented and institutionalized, so that a culture of disciplined action replaces excessive control.

135 The Logic of System Leadership Learning Potential of all Students Repertoire of Learning Skills Models of Learning - Tools for Teaching Embedded in Curriculum Context and Schemes of Work Whole School Emphasis on High Expectations and Pedagogic Consistency Sharing Schemes of Work and Curriculum Across and Between Schools, Clusters, Districts, LEAs and Nationally

136 Personal Development Strategic Acumen Managing Teaching and Learning Developing People Developing Organisations Work as a Change Agent Lead a Successful Educational Improvement Partnership Moral Purpose Partner another School Facing Difficulties and Improve it Lead and Improve a School in Challenging Circumstances Act as a Community Leader

137 System Leadership Roles A range of emerging roles, including heads who: develop and lead a successful educational improvement partnership across local communities to support welfare and potential choose to lead and improve a school in extremely challenging circumstances partner another school facing difficulties and improve it. This category includes Executive Heads and leaders of more informal improvement arrangements act as curriculum and pedagogic innovators who develop and then transfer best practice across the system Work as change agents or experts leaders as National Leader of Education, School Improvement Partner, Consultant Leader.

138 Support an acting head rather than ‘take over’ Draw detail plans for improvement which included: a) Diagnosis of the key practices the neighbouring school needed to develop b) Clarity on Robert Clack’s teaching and learning and behaviour systems c) A visit to Robert Clack for staff in early September to witness the behaviour management, assemblies, and teaching and learning in action so as to give an insight into what was possible in very similar circumstances d) The export and refinement of these systems from one school into the other, employing key staff from Robert Clack to deliver, in particular, Ofsted demands for immediate improvements in behaviour A 2 days a week consultant leadership to support implementation of the behaviour systems The school got out of Special Measures! Supporting a school in Special measures The Head teacher as a consultant leader

139 Confidence for the leadership to know what needed to be done to get a school out of special measures A committed contribution for staff both a) To help another school through a situation they had faced themselves and b) To gain unique professional development An experience which now underpins Robert Clack’s roles as a mentor school for the London Challenge and a lead school for an SSAT network The flip side: personal reputations and the school’s resources were put to the test Benefits for the Robert Clack School

140 Turnaround Schools – Emerging Themes Develop a narrative for sustained improvement : The ability to determine the capacity needed to undertake improvement activities An understanding of the regularities needed to sustain improvement in a school To identify and transfer best practice internally, with the potential to work externally The creation of an ethos of high expectations To work and negotiate with a range of stakeholders and other schools

141 The Challenge of Public Sector Reform

142 What this looks like in schools in challenging circumstances In schools in challenging circumstances the key activities are: Creating an orderly environment Ensuring consistency in teaching practice Prioritising the work on literacy and numeracy Taking ownership for the progress of students and creating high expectations Developing and supporting leadership capacity Establishing systems for data use

143 What this looks like in schools with high levels of internal variation In schools with high levels of internal variation, the key activities are: Creating a learning environment within the school Sharing the best of teaching practice through rounds Strengthening the work on literacy and numeracy across the curriculum Introducing assessment for learning to enable students to take more control over their own learning Distributing leadership capacity Monitoring student progress through data use

144 What this looks like in successful schools In successful schools, the key activities are: Creating a self directed and inclusive learning environment Introducing innovations in teaching and sharing with other schools Strengthening cross curriculum working and enquiry based projects Encouraging student voice to enrich the curriculum monitor their own progress and to champion curiosity Engaging in system leadership Using data formatively to enhance the progress of all students

145 “One Size Does not Fit All” A- 3 C -I B - 2a,2b

146 Differential Strategies for School Improvement Type 111 strategies are those that assist effective schools to become even better. Exposure to new ideas and practices, collaboration through consortia or 'pairing' type arrangements seems to be common in these situations. Type 11 strategies are those that assist moderately effective schools become effective. These schools need to refine their developmental priorities and focus on specific teaching and learning issues, and build the capacity within the school to support this work. These strategies usually involve a certain level of external support. Type 11a strategies are characterised by a strategic focus on innovations in teaching and learning that are informed and supported by external knowledge and support. Type 11b strategies rely less on external support and tend to be more school initiated. Type 1 strategies are those that assist failing schools become moderately effective. They need to involve a high level of external support. These strategies have to involve a clear and direct focus on a limited number of basic curriculum and organisational issues, in order to build the confidence and competence to continue.

147 Estimated 5+A*-C % from pupil KS3 data Actual 5+A*-C % N = 3313 Low Achieving N = 483 Underperforming N = 539 Progressing N = 1495 High Performing N = 696 Leading the System N = 100 Segmentation of the Secondary School System Below 30% 5+A-C 5+A*-C >=30%, lower quartile value added 5+A*-C >=30%, th percentile value added 5+A*-C >=30%, upper quartile value added

148 Networking and Segmentation: Highly Differentiated Improvement Strategies Type of School Leading schools Succeeding schools with internal variation Underperforming schools Failing schools Key strategies – responsive to context and need - Become curriculum and pedagogical innovators - Formal federation with lower- performing schools - Regular local networking - Subject specialist support to particular depts. - Linked school support - Consistency interventions - Formal support in a Federation structure - New provider System Leadership Role - Leading Edge - Consultant Leaders and National Support Schools - Education Improvement Partnerships partnerships - Raising Achievement Transforming Learning - School Improvement Partners - Consultant Leaders and National Support Schools - School Sponsored Academy

149 Collaboration – the offer to schools Every school will have the opportunity to benefit from and contribute to network learning The focus of collaboration will be on student learning and achievement and the creation of professional learning communities in schools Networking arrangements will be based on the twin principles of inclusivity and local accountability Regional Offices will co-ordinate, support and encourage collaboration and network to network learning Regional, State and Federal levels will actively support networking for specific purposes – Federations, Achievement Zones …

150 Segmentation requires a fair degree of boldness … Schools should take greater responsibility for neighbouring schools so that the move towards networking encourages groups of schools to form substantive collaborative arrangements. All failing and underperforming (and potentially low achieving) schools should have a leading school that works with them in either a formal grouping Federation or in more informal partnership. The incentives for greater system responsibility should include significantly enhanced funding for students most at risk. A rationalisation of national and local agency functions and roles to allow the higher degree of national and regional co-ordination for this increasingly devolved system.

151 Responsible System Leadership System leadership at the school level – with school principals almost as concerned about the success of other schools as they are about their own System leadership at the local level – with practical principles widely shared and used as a basis for local alignment so that school diversity, collaboration and segmentation – that all schools are at different stages in the performance cycle on a continuum from “leading” to “failing” – are deliberately exploited and specific programmes are developed for the groups most at risk System leadership at the system level – with social justice, moral purpose and a commitment to the success of every learner providing the focus for transformation.

152 Coherent System Design Leadership and School ethos Teaching quality High quality personalised learning for every student Personalised Learning and Professionalised Teaching Intelligent accountability, Governance and Segmentation Innovation, Networking and System Leadership UNIVERSAL HIGHUNIVERSAL HIGH Recurrent funding Physical capital Human capital Knowledge creation and management Qualifications framework Curriculum STANDARDSSTANDARDS Hardware Infrastructure Software Teaching and learning Operating system Reform model

153 Ambitious Standards Devolved responsibility Good data and clear targets Access to best practice and quality professional development Accountability Intervention in inverse proportion to success High Challenge High Support New Labour Policy Framework

154 Towards system wide sustainable reform Every School a Great School National Prescription Schools Leading Reform Building Capacity Prescription Professionalism System Leadership

155 Complementary Policy Framework for System Reform Ambitious Standards Devolved responsibility Good data and clear targets Access to best practice and quality professional development Accountability Intervention in inverse proportion to success High Challenge High Support Governance and Segmentati on Innovation and Networking System Leadership Professionalised Teaching Intelligent Accountabil ity Every School a Great School Personalised Learning

156 Governance and Segmentation Innovation and Networking System Leadership Professionalised Teaching Intelligent Accountability Every School a Great School Personalised Learning Every School a Great School Framework

157 “All our students will be literate, numerate and curious … “

158 In 2013 … A student finishing primary school will demonstrate: − individual performance at or above national standards in literacy and numeracy − a sharp curiosity for learning. A student finishing secondary school will have: − a clear, well-defined pathway to further training and education. A parent will have: − a substantive, meaningful engagement with their child’s school and their child’s teachers − a clear understanding of their child’s progress against national standards.

159 Teachers will have: − world class professional skills − enjoy high regard in their school communities − continuing access to quality professional learning opportunities. The community will have confidence that: − individual student performance meets national standards − graduates are capable of making valuable contributions as citizens and employees. Our success will be marked by: − students who are proud of their schools and what they have achieved − parents who are confident that sending their child to a public school is a sound educational decision. In 2013 …

160 Every School a Great School Improvement Strategy - 1

161 Every School a Great School Improvement Strategy – 2

162 Every School a Great School School Improvement Strategy – 3

163 Every School a Great School School Improvement Strategy – 4

164 Every School a Great School School Improvement Strategy – 5

165 Every School a Great School School Improvement Strategy – 6

166 Professional Discussion Schools exist in increasingly complex and turbulent environments, but the best schools ‘turn towards the danger’ and adapt external change for internal purpose. Schools should use external standards to clarify, integrate and raise their own expectations. School benefit from highly specified, but not prescribed, models of best practice. Schools, by themselves and in networks, engage in policy implementation through a process of selecting and integrating innovations through their focus on teaching and learning. Schools use the principles of segmentation to transform the system Discuss how you do this The future reform agenda is about schools supporting each other in a new educational landscape:

167 Professional Activity There are five key variables in any regional approach to systemic reform: Clear and comprehensive model of reform Strong leadership at the regional level Substantive training related to the goals of the programme Implementation support at the school level An increasingly differentiated approach to school improvement. A now well-established methodology for assessing the performance of public services is by ‘RAG rating’. This involves red, amber, green rating on a range of critical variables such as those noted above.

168 Session Six Developing our school improvement journeys

169 Professional Discussion SWOT Analysis What are the preconditions of improvement in a school? How does a school organize for improvement? What are the key strategies employed to raise achievement? How does professional learning take place? How are cultures changed and developed? How effective is your own school’s approach to improvement?

170 Professional Activity 1. Agree groupings for activity – individual schools, clusters, pre-prep, twilight etc 2. Review the SWOT analysis and other data generated during the workshop 3. On the basis of that reflection produce a poster of your school improvement journey 4. Display your poster and leave an advocate to describe the work for others and tour around all the posters noting key ideas and strategies 5. Return to tables and discuss key strategies 6. Share 3 top strategies with whole group

171 Paulo Freire once said… “No one educates anyone else Nor do we educate ourselves We educate one another in communion In the context of living in this world ”

172 David Hopkins is Professor Emeritus at the Institute of Education, University of London, where until recently, he held the inaugural HSBC iNet Chair in International Leadership. He is a Trustee of Outward Bound and is Executive Director of the new charity ‘Adventure Learning Schools’. David holds visiting professorships at the Catholic University of Santiago, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Universities of Edinburgh, Melbourne and Wales and consults internationally on school reform. Between 2002 and 2005 he served three Secretary of States as the Chief Adviser on School Standards at the Department for Education and Skills. Previously, he was Chair of the Leicester City Partnership Board and Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Nottingham. Before that again he was a Tutor at the University of Cambridge Institute of Education, a Secondary School teacher and Outward Bound Instructor. David is also an International Mountain Guide who still climbs regularly in the Alps and Himalayas. His recent books Every School a Great School and System Leadership in Practice are published by The Open University Press. Website: Professor David Hopkins


Download ppt "“ Being a relentless focus on improving the learning outcomes of ‘every student’ in ‘every school’ across the whole system … Limestone Coast Region Leader’s."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google